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June 24, 2008
The Corporate Grip on Food Tightens
They've Got the World by the Belly
By P. SAINATH
Rich elite of world gaining control of food so rich elite can profit from rise in price of food
W hen you’re down to distributing fertilizer from a police station, you have a problem.
It’s what they did in Hingoli, here in the Indian state of in Maharashtra.
That was a week ago, but the police are still, in a sense, involved in its distribution there and elsewhere.
In Hingoli itself, there are lots of policemen controlling the queues outside dealers’ outlets.
The dealers won’t open up otherwise.
Thanks to the police, Hingoli’s farmers got some fertilizer.
Sort of gives a whole new meaning to the acronym PDS. Police Distribution System.
In Nanded, cops wielding riot sticks charged angry farmers demanding fertilizer needed urgently with the rains setting in.
In Akola, there is heavy police security precautions for the same reasons.
More than one Agriculture Officer has fled his workplace to escape mobs.
There were angry outbursts at the market place in the chief minister’s own constituency at Latur.
Protests in neighbouring Karnataka have grabbed national attention with a farmer being shot dead.
In Andhra Pradesh, farmers stormed zilla parishad meetings in Medak and Rangareddy and set up road blocks in other districts.
In Vidharbha’s cotton belt, for all the celebration of Bt’s success, there have been huge shifts towards soybean.
That’s because soybean costs much less to grow than cotton.
At least for now. soybean needs less fertilizer than cotton.
But all the same, it still needs it at the time of sowing, just as the rains set in.
In Madhya Pradesh’s, “soya bowl,” the shortages are hurting.
And for years now, more farmers have been joining the soybean bandwagon in other states, too.
Corporate conquest of agriculture is well apace
At the very least, it argues that government was unprepared for the agricultural season.
The shortages had been predicted for a long time.
Not just fertilizer, but seeds as well.
In Maharashtra, the state argues that the Gujjar agitation has crippled freight train traffic, hence the shortages.
This may well be a real factor, but it is not going to account for the 60 per cent shortfall in supply.
Even if we tide over the present crisis, fertilizer troubles will worsen.
Many complex factors are asserting themselves.
Some of the very things that happened with grain and food prices are at work with fertilizer as well.
The corporate conquest of agriculture is well apace.
As the Wall Street Journal (April 30, 2008) notes:
“At a time when parts of the world are facing food riots, Big Agriculture is dealing with a different sort of challenge: huge profits.”
The WSJ points to the grain-processing giant Archer-Daniels-Midland Co., which saw a 42 per cent leap in its fiscal third quarter profits.
“Including a sevenfold increase in net income in its unit that stores, transports and trades grains such as wheat and corn, as well as soybeans.”
Seed and herbicide giant Monsanto and fertilizer maker Mosaic Co. “all reported similar windfalls in their latest quarters.”
As the WSJ grudgingly says:
“Some observers think financial speculation has helped push up prices as wealthy investors in the past year have flooded the agriculture commodity markets in search of better returns.”
So much so that: “The Commodity Futures Trading Commission last week held a hearing in Washington to examine the role index funds and other speculators are playing in driving up grain prices.”
The WSJ cites research showing that total index fund investment in corn, soybean, wheat, cattle and hogs has risen by 37 billion dollars (which is well over double India’s farm loan waiver for millions of farmers) since 2006.
Inflation over 11 percent, June 2008
New York Times and Murdock's Wall Street Journal parrot the corporate chant
Now, it’s the turn of the New York Times (June 5, 2008) to note that “a few big private investors are starting to make bolder and longer-term bets that the world’s need for food will greatly increase — by buying farmland, fertilizer, grain elevators and shipping equipment.”
One company has bought about five dozen fertilizer distribution outlets and a fleet of barges and ships.
And others, “including the giant BlackRock fund group in New York, are separately planning to invest hundreds of millions of dollars in agriculture, chiefly farmland, from sub-Saharan Africa to the English countryside.”
Of course, the NYT and WSJ also parrot the corporate chant that this could be a good thing for hungry humanity.
“These new bets by big investors could bolster food production at a time when the world needs more of it,” says the NYT report.
And the WSJ notes that food companies “say bigger profits can be used to develop new technologies that will ultimately help farmers improve productivity.
Monsanto says it’s designing improved genetically modified seeds that can squeeze even more yield from each acre of planted grain.”
Gee!
They’re the good guys, actually.
In the WSJ’s eyes (June 10, 2008) the villains are elsewhere.
The problems arise with “China and India gobbling food as never before and food prices soaring…”
Complex as the reality is, the principles are fairly simple.
But you cannot live without food and water
At a time when debates in India highlight the un-viability of agriculture, giant corporations are betting the opposite.
For them, at least, it holds the promise of an undying source of super profit.
The NYT report’s headline sums it up nicely: “Food is gold, so billions invested in farming.”
Ultimately, you can live without a lot of things, yes, even television.
Or aircraft and SUVs.
But you cannot live without food and water.
The latter “commodity” is the focus of the biggest thrust of some huge multinational companies.
And we are well into the process of privatising water in India (for them) in a process that promises chaos, misery and conflict on a scale we cannot begin to grasp at this point.
Across the globe, the entire chain of resources and inputs is now getting cornered by corporations.
Farm land, water, fertilizer, seed, pesticide and many more.
Grab these together and you’ve got the world by its belly.
The giant companies are now putting out papers on how they will solve the world’s food problem.
Fashion
show
New
Delhi
June
25
2008
But you cannot live without food and water
Never mind they are at the heart of it.
Meanwhile, making chemical fertilizer requires large use of fossil fuels.
So rising oil prices further spur the fertilizer crisis.
The rip-off by the top corporations in that sector has been so great that even the United States Senate saw moves to impose a windfall profits tax on oil companies.
(In India, the government responded to such calls by transferring the burden to the people and asking for “patience on the inflationary trend.”)
Of course, it was scotched in the Senate, too.
Fertilizer subsidies in India have for long gone to manufacturers, not farmers.
(If they went to farmers directly, they would have more choice in what fertilizer to use.)
Meanwhile, the world over, speculative capital has been moving towards agricultural commodities and fertilizer.
Other sectors in the stock markets have tanked or not done so well.
In India, too, calls for a ban on futures trading in agricultural commodities arose from such a situation.
Wheat went underground for a while.
Prices rose (and keep rising).
Now it is the turn of fertilizer.
A bag of Diammonium Phosphate today costs Rs. 490 officially.
In black, it sells for around Rs. 600.
(The global price, far more under corporate control, is at least four times as much. That makes imports more difficult.)
Even our nominal price is nearly three times what it was 15 years ago.
For well over a decade now, we have invested less and less in agriculture.
Following the World Bank-IMF menu, we discouraged food crop and focused on cash crop and sang the hymns of export-led growth.
Mindless de-regulation saw corporate control grip more sectors of agriculture.
Seed, fertilizer, markets, you name it.
We reduced our agricultural universities to labs for private corporations.
We stepped up our use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides.
Millions of farmers were shifted to a much higher-cost economy where input costs are crippling.
And then we withdrew credit
A (non-organic) farmer in 1991 could cultivate an acre of cotton in Vidharbha for Rs. 2,500. [Just over $60.]
Today that would cost him or her Rs. 13,000 or more, given the “miracles” of chemicals, pesticides and Bt.
As these costs shot up, we disabled our capacities to meet the needs of the cultivator.
And then we withdrew credit.
Even if the fertilizer comes through this season, countless farmers in the post-loan waiver world find themselves without fresh credit.
“We’re not mad,” say bank managers in crisis regions.
“The farmer has no new income.
“Nor better prices.
“How will someone who could not repay Rs. 10,000 repay thrice that sum?”
So who do farmers seeking credit turn to?
The very input dealers who are emerging the major source of informal credit in the countryside.
And who are implicated in the black marketing of vital inputs in every crisis.
The fertilizer shortage might even be overcome just now.
But the crisis won’t go away.
It and many more to come are built into both what’s going on in world capitalism and what we have been doing in India.
We’ve dismantled vital parts of our agriculture and with it, the livelihoods of millions.
This at a time when the World Bank and IMF are trying to hide their tracks in the trail of disaster they left the world over.
A study by the Bank’s economists now says that “economic growth of the agriculture sector is at least twice as effective at reducing poverty as any other sector.” (The Wall Street Journal, June 10, 2008).
And we fail to see why food costs could get a lot worse.
The corporations do, though.
As that NYT headline puts it: “Food is gold, so billions invested in farming.”
Or, more truly, in the capture of it.
 
 
 
BBC — Monday, 7 April 2008
Is India facing a food crisis?
Paranjoy Guha Thakurta
By Paranjoy Guha Thakurta
Indian economy analyst
Having to beg in India.

Accumulation of wealth — India and corporations — Deregulation 

Inflation hurts the poor most
Having to beg in India
Inflation hurts the poor most
Is India, the world's second most populous nation, facing a food crisis?
This question is vexing policy makers and analysts alike even as creeping inflation — around 7% now — is sending jitters through the Congress party-led ruling coalition.
To be sure, India has not yet experienced riots over rising food prices that have hit other countries like Zimbabwe or Argentina.
But what is worrying everybody is that the current rise in inflation is driven by high food prices.
In the capital, Delhi, milk costs 11% more than last year. Edible oil prices have climbed by a whopping 40% over the same period.
More crucially, rice prices have risen by 20% and prices of certain lentils by 18%. Rice and lentils comprise the staple diet for many Indians.
Rice being sold in India shop

Food prices have risen sharply in the past year
Rice being sold in India shop
Food prices have risen sharply in the past year
Tax on the poor
Inflation, economists say, is akin to a tax on the poor since food accounts for a relatively high proportion of their expenses.
All of which is bad news for ruling politicians because the poor in India vote in much larger numbers than the affluent.
Roughly one out of four Indians lives on less than $1 a day and three out of four earn $2 or less.
The rise in food prices, the government says, is an international phenomenon.
But this argument is unlikely to cut much ice with the people.
At the crux of the crisis is the tardy pace at which farm output has been growing in recent years.
The Indian economy has been growing rapidly at an average of 8.5% over the last five years.
This growth has been mainly confined to manufacturing industry and the burgeoning services sector.
Agriculture, on the other hand, has grown by barely 2.5% over the last five years and the trend rate of growth is even lower if the past decade and a half is considered.
Consequently, per capita output of cereals (wheat and rice) at present is more or less at the level that prevailed in the 1970s.
Indian farmer

Growth in the farm sector has been sluggish
Indian farmer
Growth in the farm sector has been sluggish
The problem acquires a serious dimension since farming provides livelihood to around 60% of India's 1.1 billion people even though farm produce comprises only 18% of the country's current gross domestic product (GDP).
On the other hand, the services sector — that includes the fast-growing computer software and business process outsourcing industries — constitutes over 55% of GDP with the remainder being taken up by industry.
The crisis in farms is exemplified by the state of the country's cereal stocks.
Vulnerable farmers
Six years ago, the stocks were at record levels.
Nobel laureate economist Amartya Sen had said if all the bags of wheat and rice with the state-owned Food Corporation of India were placed end to end, they would go all the way to the moon and back.
Stocks have come down over the past three years because of low production and exports.
The problem has been compounded by the fact that whenever India has imported wheat in recent months, world prices of wheat have shot up.
Rice being sold in India shop.

Accumulation of wealth — India and corporations — Deregulation 

Food prices have risen sharply in the past year
Rice being sold in India shop
Food prices have risen sharply in the past year
Government pays twice as high for imports as pay its own farmers
There is also considerable resentment over the fact that the price of wheat that the government imports is often twice as high as the minimum price the government pay its own farmers for domestically grown wheat.
60% of cropped area not irrigated
Indian farmers are particularly vulnerable since 60% per cent of the country's total cropped area is not irrigated.
They are also dependent on the four-month-long monsoon during which period 80% of the year's total rainfall takes place.
The crisis in agriculture has been manifest in the growing incidence of farmers taking their own lives.
Mass suicide of farmers
At least 10,000 farmers have committed suicide each year over the last decade because of their inability of repay loans taken at usurious rates of interest from local moneylenders.
Famine of Bengal 1943
... an acute shortage of food in India ...during the infamous famine in Bengal in 1943 in which more than 1.5 million people are estimated to have died of starvation.
Pulses sold in a India shop.

Accumulation of wealth — India and corporations — Deregulation 

Rising food prices has made the government jittery
Pulses sold in a India shop
Rising food prices has made the government jittery
The problem then — and now — is entitlement or access to food at affordable prices.
Given the low purchasing power of India's poor, even a small increase in food prices contributes to a sharp fall in real incomes.
The current crisis in Indian agriculture is a consequence of many factors — low rise in farm productivity, unremunerative prices for cultivators, poor food storage facilities resulting in high levels of wastage.
...The government has announced a $15bn waiver of farmer loans and extended a jobs scheme — ensuring 100 days of work in a year entailing manual labour to every family demanding such work at the official minimum wage — to all over the country.
None of these populist initiatives will really work until India's rulers begin giving its ignored farms the importance they deserve.
MMVIII
 
Published on Sunday, February 18, 2007 by the Progressive
Corporate Globalization Kills
by Amitabh Pal
Globalization is a battering ram for Western corporations.
And even when the consequences are literally life or death, companies are eager to utilize the World Trade Organization for their limitless hunger for profits.
Greed knows no limit for some corporations.
Even when it involves the lives of millions.
Take a pending court case in India.
It has the potential to adversely affect the health of not only the more than 1 billion Indian citizens but of patients throughout the developing world.
In 2005, India’s parliament amended its patent laws to comply with WTO rules, in spite of warnings by health experts that this would result in affordable medicines being no longer available in the country.
“Amit Sen Gupta, head of the Delhi Science Forum, a scientists’ group, worries that product patents will turn the clock back to the 1960s, when Western drug companies dominated India, set high prices and conducted little research on tropical diseases that, like leprosy and malaria, do not affect Americans or Europeans,” the New York Times reported.
I was traveling by train in India a few months after the 2005 law was passed and entered into a conversation with a person who owned and operated a small pharmaceutical firm.
When I asked him about the possible effects of the new patent law, he responded that it was too soon to assess the impact but that the long-term effects could be disastrous for Indian drug manufacturers.
Well, all these fears seem to be proving correct now.
A significant court challenge has been launched in Indian courts by the Swiss pharmaceutical behemoth Novartis to stake its proprietary right over a leukemia drug.
And Novartis is far from the only Western pharmaceutical firm to have sought to assert a patent claim in India.
In fact, the BBC reports that 9,000 pending patent applications are waiting to be reviewed in India under the new law! In another significant court case, the U.S.-based Gilead Sciences has attempted to press its claim for a patent for its antiretroviral drug Viread in India, a move that would make cheaper Indian versions unavailable in a host of nations.
“These generic drugs are not only consumed in India,” Leena Menghaney of the Nobel-winning Doctors Without Borders told The New York Times.
“People in Africa and the Caribbean are relying on India to produce these drugs. . . . The quality matches that of U.S.- manufactured drugs, but the prices are affordable.”
To give an example of the burden that will be imposed on poor patients in the developing world if the strategy of Western pharmaceutical firms succeeds, Gilead’s Viread costs nearly $6,000 per patient per year in the West.
A generic version of the drug made by an Indian pharmaceutical, Cipla, costs $700, with the chair of the company, Yusuf Hamied, promising that it would be made available in Africa for half that cost.
But all this could be imperiled if companies like Gilead have their way in Indian courts.
Realizing the potentially life-threatening consequences of this issue, AIDS activists in India are waging a number of campaigns involving such drugs, including against Gilead and the British giant GlaxoSmithKline.
Greed knows no limit for corporations
A bit of background:
In 1970, India under the Indira Gandhi government amended its patent law to have patents awarded only for processes to make medicines, not for the final products.
This enabled Indian pharmaceutical firms to alter the processes slightly and make cheaper versions of essentially the same products sold by Western firms in India for astronomical prices.
The result?
“India became the ‘pharmacy of the world's poor’ in 1970 when it stopped issuing patents for medicines,” the BBC states.
“This allowed its many drug producers to create generic copies of medicines still patent-protected in other countries —at a fraction of the price charged by Western drug firms.”
The changed law also dramatically improved lives in India.
“At the time, India's drug prices were among the highest in the world,” wrote The New York Times a few years ago.
“Now they are among the lowest. Access to drugs is one reason that average life expectancy has risen to 64 today.”
Now all of this is being jeopardized, with grave health consequences.
The BBC quotes Doctors Without Borders as saying that a number of Indian firms have already stopped producing some generic AIDS drugs because of the possible legal ramifications.
Greed knows no limit for some corporations.
Even when it involves the lives of millions.
Thursday, 22 February 2007
Protests greet Wal-Mart in India
Protests against Wal-Mart in Delhi.

Small retailers fear that they will lose business.
Protests against Wal-Mart in Delhi
Small retailers fear that they will lose business
A visit to India by Wal-Mart executives has sparked protests by small shopkeepers worried about its plans for a tie-up with Bharti Enterprises.
Communist protesters were briefly arrested after they marched on government buildings in Delhi, waving placards saying "Save small retailers".
Wal-Mart vice-chairman Michael Duke is in Mumbai for talks with Bharti bosses and government representatives.
Wal-Mart and Bharti are planning a joint venture for cash-and-carry.
Foreign interest
A statement from Wal-Mart says Mr Duke is visiting India "to learn more about the market first-hand and to further explore the wholesale cash-and-carry business".
The protestors burned an effigy representing Wal-Mart near the office of Kamal Nath, the Indian commerce and trade minister.
India's retail industry is worth about $300bn (£150bn) a year and has attracted the interest of international retailers such as Metro, Carrefour and Tesco.
A spokesman for India FDI Watch, which tries to limit the growth of foreign retailers in India, says Wal-Mart's entry threatens large numbers of jobs.
"Around 40 million people depend on the retail sector and these people's livelihoods will be ruined if Wal-Mart is permitted to enter India's retail market," he said.
Indian law currently allows foreign multi-brand retailers to run only cash-and-carry or franchise businesses.
MMVII
In law books if you see the definition of intellectual property — it's a fifteen year old term — it says intellectual property is property of products of the mind.
I keep having these images, you know some artist should do it, where seeds keep popping out of Monsanto's CO head.
They've come out of the soil.   Millions of years of evolution.
Ten thousand years of farmer's breeding.
And they call it a produce of a fictitious person's mind.
Because that is what a corporation is.
Many farmers in 2004 sowed not once but three times in this region.
Like Namdeo Bonde in Kothuda village.
'He sowed three times, you might even say four,' says his brother Pandurang.
But the showers only misled him.
'He got a little bit with the third sowing.
'But the costs were killing.
'By his third try, input dealers were charging 50 per cent to 80 per cent more.
'And then his crop failed.'
Sunk in debt, Namdeo Bonde took his life last November.
 

Vandana Shiva — Traprock Peace Center, April 10, 2005
I believe we are entering extremely strange times.
And if we keep responding to issues as we did yesterday, then we are trapped from multiple directions.
Let me give a few examples:
Just last week in India the attempt to totally dismantle labor laws was not presented as dismantling labor laws.
It was presented as giving women the freedom to work at night.
I don't think there is any step in taking away our liberties, our freedoms, our economic freedoms, our cultural freedoms, our political freedoms, that are today packaged as a taking away.
They are always packaged as our liberation.
And, in a way, those who dominate through multiple instrumentalities have figured out exactly how to use every narrow liberation against people and their freedoms.
Through the nineties, we saw the emergence in India of the absolute explosion of religious fundamentalism as the growth of political representation.
It all began with a very well calculated attempt to tear down a mosque.
Very, very well crafted, down to the remotest village where people did not see themselves as supporting a right wing party.
They saw themselves as worshipping their God Ram.
In every village a brick was made with a natural dedication of a society in which Ram Raj has meant governance for the good.
These bricks were then collected across the country, taken to Ayodhya, where a mosque had come out during mogul rules.
Over a decade, this mobilization to build a temple and later tear down the mosque, ended up increasing the participation of the right wing party BJP from two people in ninety-one to becoming the majority in the last elections.
Of course they lost out and I'll come to that later.
Our last Parliament, the majority was in the hands of a party which had had not more than two people since the time of independence in 1947.
Wal-Mart have destroyed hundreds of thousands of small business in the United States
Town Centers have become a wasteland
In the United States more than half Wal-Mart employees, seek government assistance, go without medical care due to lack of money
I tried to both understand this phenomena, or what's going on, as well as to work with the responses.
I feel what's going on is a combination of natural spiritual religious leanings of people, their normal faiths and their normal beliefs, used for other motives.
But more significantly, and I feel that's where the we can [draw parallels with this country,] has to do with the forms of the economic organizations that have been brought to us under various names as globalizations, free trade, of new liberal ideology.
All of it is ultimately about making the accumulation of capital, making the accumulation of wealth, absolutely free of any social, and any environmental obligations.
It is about deregulation of commerce, deregulation of capital.
But is never put in the language of deregulation.
It is put in the language of liberation.
Of getting rid of protectionism.
Of getting rid of tariff barriers.
Of getting rid of public systems which are now called monopolistic.
In 1942 we had the worst of our famines, the great Bengal famine — two million people died because of lack of access to food, not because of lack of food in the country, we had grown enough rice but it was all being exported out.
We had a free trade regime then and it let to a brilliant movement of women.
Women stood in front of their paddy and said we will give our lives we will not give our rice.
Anti Wal-Mart protest
Wal-Mart is for the rich
Wal-Mart will not benefit India
1942 is also the time the 'Quit India' movement started.
The 'Quit India' movement led to a whole different response from the British, at that time the Empire.
One of the responses was to create a divide-and-rule police.
1942 is when we started seeing the early stages of Hindi Muslim conflict.
It's not that the British hadn't tried it earlier.
They had tried it in 1930 when we had the salt laws.
Responded to by Gandhi in the famous Gandhi march which was being re-enacted in the last few weeks in India.
Imposed will of ruthless merchant-adventurers
The Hong Kong ministerial of the World Trade Organization talks held between December 13th and 18th 2005 dealt a severe blow to small farmers and retailers, landless laborers and marginal workers in poorer countries, squandering the gains made at Cancun in 2003 for lip-service unmatched by actions, and ensuring environmental and social chaos for years to come.
And it was not lack of leadership but the co-option of the so-called leaders of the developing countries — Brazil and India — that caused this.
Strike one: the US and the EU side-stepped setting a firm date for a genuine end to farm subsidies but simultaneously battered down the door to third-world markets for agricultural and manufacturing products.
Western governments, which wrung their hands about the nebulous threat of avian flu and stockpiled Tamiflu to the high heavens to the delight of bloated pharmaceutical companies, condemned millions to destitution coldly and deliberately.
But they made sure to hide their venality in the deceptive language of a "free-trade" that is neither free nor trade but the imposed will of ruthless merchant-adventurers.
Get Monsanto out of the seed sector.
They are part of this genocide.
Wednesday, December 13th, 2006
Vandana Shiva on Farmer Suicides, the U.S.-India Nuclear Deal, Wal-Mart in India and More
Throughout India, more and more troubled farmers are killing themselves.
Up to three farmers a day swallow pesticides, hang themselves from trees, drown themselves in rivers, set themselves on fire or jump down wells.
Many of them are plagued by debt, poor crops and hopelessness.
— Click Here
AMY GOODMAN:    Vandana Shiva: physicist; ecologist; director of the Research Foundation on Science, Technology, and Ecology; in ’93, awarded the Alternative Nobel Peace Prize, the Right Livelihood Award; her latest book, Earth Democracy: Justice, Sustainability, and Peace.
There is an epidemic you write about in India of farmer suicides.
Can you explain what’s happening and where this is happening?
VANDANA SHIVA:    Indian farmers have never committed suicide on a large scale.
It’s something totally new.
It’s linked to the last decade of globalization, trade liberalization under a corporate-driven economy.
The seed sector was liberalized to allow corporations like Cargill and Monsanto to sell unregulated, untested seed.
They began with hybrids, which can’t be saved, and moved on to genetically engineered Bt cotton.
The cotton belt is where the suicides are taking place on a very, very large scale.
It is the suicide belt of India.
And the high cost of seed is linked to high cost of chemicals, because these seeds need chemicals.
In addition, these costly seeds need to be bought every year, because their very design is to make seeds nonrenewable, seed that isn’t renewable by its very nature, but whether it’s through patenting systems, intellectual property rights or technologically through hybridization, nonrenewable seed is being sold to farmers so they must buy every year.
There’s a case going on in the Supreme Court of India right now on the monopoly practices of Monsanto.
An antitrust court ruled against Monsanto, because the price is so high, farmers necessarily get into a debt trap, which is why I was talking about credit, for the wrong thing, could actually be a problem and not a solution.
In addition, the price of cotton is collapsing under the huge $4 billion subsidies given to agribusiness in the United States, which then dumps cotton on a world market with 50% reduction of price artificially.
This is what led to the Cancun failure of WTO, but this is what is killing Indian farmers. Just three days ago, farmers were protesting against the low prices of cotton.
They went to the government agency, which before globalization used to buy cotton at a fair price.
Widow of suicide farmer
One farmer was shot dead.
So we're not just seeing suicides, we’re also seeing farmers’ protests treated as a new threat to the regime.
AMY GOODMAN:    These descriptions of desperation, up to three farmers a day swallow pesticides, hang themselves from trees, drown themselves in rivers, set themselves on fire, or jump down wells, many of them plagued by debt, poor crops and hopelessness?
VANDANA SHIVA:    90% of the farmer suicides — we’ve studied it.
Every year we bring out a report called “Seeds of Suicide.”
We started the first report in ’97, which was the first suicide in the district of Warangal in Andhra Pradesh. Andhra Pradesh —
AMY GOODMAN:    Where is it in India?
VANDANA SHIVA:    Andhra Pradesh is kind of southern India.
But Andhra Pradesh had a government that responded, and that's the government that took Monsanto to court.
Vidarbha in Maharashtra has emerged as the epicenter.
This is where the Prime Minister visited, because the suicide issue had become so intense. Unfortunately, the Prime Minister offered exactly the same package, more of the same, as a solution.
Included in this package is a 20 billion rupee seed replacement package, which means what seed farmers has gets further destroyed, so they have no renewable seed, no affordable seed.
They must buy on the market every year.
Farmer suicides in Vidarbha are now eight per day.
A few weeks ago, I was in Punjab. 2,800 widows of farmer suicides who have lost their land, are having to bring up children as landless workers on others' land.
And yet, the system does not respond to it, because there’s only one response: get Monsanto out of the seed sector — they are part of this genocide — and ensure WTO rules are not bringing down the prices of agricultural produce in the United States, in Canada, in India, and allow trade to be honest.
I don't think we need to talk about free trade and fair trade.
We need to talk about honest trade.
Today’s trade system, especially in agriculture, is dishonest, and dishonesty has become a war against farmers.
It’s become a genocide.
... and mustard in India is very symbolic.
It’s the color of our spring.
When spring comes, we dress in the yellow of the mustard flower.
It’s our staple oil, and we love the pungency of it.
Interview continues — Click Here
 
AMY GOODMAN:    These descriptions of desperation, up to three farmers a day swallow pesticides, hang themselves from trees, drown themselves in rivers, set themselves on fire, or jump down wells, many of them plagued by debt, poor crops and hopelessness?
VANDANA SHIVA:    90% of the farmer suicides — we’ve studied it.
Every year we bring out a report called “Seeds of Suicide.”
We started the first report in ’97, which was the first suicide in the district of Warangal in Andhra Pradesh. Andhra Pradesh — Andhra Pradesh is kind of southern India.
But Andhra Pradesh had a government that responded, and that's the government that took Monsanto to court.
Vidarbha in Maharashtra has emerged as the epicenter.
This is where the Prime Minister visited, because the suicide issue had become so intense.
Unfortunately, the Prime Minister offered exactly the same package, more of the same, as a solution.
Included in this package is a 20 billion rupee seed replacement package, which means what seed farmers has gets further destroyed, so they have no renewable seed, no affordable seed.
They must buy on the market every year.
Farmer suicides in Vidarbha are now eight per day.
A few weeks ago, I was in Punjab. 2,800 widows of farmer suicides who have lost their land, are having to bring up children as landless workers on others' land.
And yet, the system does not respond to it, because there’s only one response:
Get Monsanto out of the seed sector.
They are part of this genocide.
And ensure WTO rules are not bringing down the prices of agricultural produce in the United States, in Canada, in India, and allow trade to be honest.
I don't think we need to talk about free trade and fair trade.
We need to talk about honest trade.
Today’s trade system, especially in agriculture, is dishonest, and dishonesty has become a war against farmers.
It’s become a genocide.
AMY GOODMAN:    Can you talk about the water tower protests?
VANDANA SHIVA:    In the state of Rajasthan, which is the capital of the production of mustard — and mustard in India is very symbolic.
It’s the color of our spring.
When spring comes, we dress in the yellow of the mustard flower.
It’s our staple oil, and we love the pungency of it.
1998, Monsanto and Cargill managed to get a ban on indigenous oils in order to create a market for soya oil, something we’ve never eaten before.
We led a movement of women to bring back the mustard.
But today, 70% of the oil India is eating, edible oil — and India was the capital of edible oil production — mustard, sesame, linseed, coconut, wonderful healthy oils — today, 70% of our edible oil market is soya oil dumped on us, palm oil dumped on us.
And, as you know, today soya is being cultivated in cutting the Amazon, and palm oil is being cultivated cutting the rain forest of Borneo.
When the farmers can’t sell their mustard — nobody's buying it — they’ve had protests.
Twelve farmers were killed in Central India.
And there was a farmer who climbed onto the water tower a few months ago, mimicking a Bollywood film, but basically saying he would jump to suicide if the farmer’s mustard was not bought.
This hijacking of the market for agriculture by a handful of agribusiness, which is what the rules of WTO are — the Agreement on Agriculture is basically putting all of agriculture into the hands of ADM, ConAgra and Cargill, and all the seed sector into the hands of Monsanto — it must necessarily destroy more and more farms, more and more farming, and push more farmers to suicide for a while, unless we get a change.
We work for the change, and our work in Navdanya shows that farmers can double their incomes by using their own seeds, doing organic farming.
All they need is a joining of hands with urban consumers and definitely a change in the rules of trade, which have treated the rights of Cargill as fundamental rights.
And something Americans don't know much about, the nuclear deal with India has a twin agreement, and that twin agreement is on agriculture.
It’s called the Knowledge Initiative on Agriculture, and on the board of this agreement are Monsanto, ADM and Wal-Mart.
So a grab of the seed sector by Monsanto, of the trade sector by the giant agribusiness, and the retail sector, which is 400 million people in India, by Wal-Mart.
These are issues that are preoccupying us for about democracy in India right now.
 
AMY GOODMAN:    Vandana Shiva, I want to go back to that deal that just was announced this weekend, surprised some.
The US will send nuclear fuel shipments for civilian use, critics saying it will allow India to use its existing nuclear fuel to build up to 50 nuclear weapons.
And then I want to ask you to expand on this corollary that we definitely didn't know about.
VANDANA SHIVA:    You know, the nuclear deal with India, in fact, shows the double standards of US nuclear policy, because for the same things that Iran does — Iran is axis of evil — but India here, through this nuclear agreement, is being told, we will separate civilian use and military use.
Military use will be India's sovereign decision.
I don't think it will be India's sovereign decision, because I think in this deal is a strategic use of India for Asia, for a containment for China.
But in addition to that, there is turning India into a nuclear market: a sale of nuclear technologies, of nuclear fuel.
And I think we need to contextualize this in the context of the climate debates.
Climate change has made us recognize that we can't keep messing up the atmosphere and pumping more carbon dioxide.
But nuclear doesn't become clean automatically just because carbon dioxide has destabilized the climate.
Nuclear is being offered as a clean development mechanism.
And not only will it spread nuclear risks and hazards in India, it will also allow corporations, like General Electric and others who pollute with carbon dioxide, as well as them, get quotas through emissions trading and markets for nuclear technology.
You know, I was a nuclear physicist.
I left my career in 1972.
I was training to be a nuclear physicist in India’s atomic energy program in the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, and I left because I realized very clearly nuclear power, as much as nuclear war, are systems where you cannot have democracy.
They're inconsistent with democracy.
And I love democracy too much.
So I went on to do theoretical physics.
AMY GOODMAN:    So explain further this corollary that involves these other large multinational corporations. And why is it part of the nuclear deal?
VANDANA SHIVA::    Well, two days ago the US representative — I think it’s Mr. Burns who announced that the nuclear deal is the cutting edge, but what the United States is really seeking is agricultural markets and real estate markets, the land of the poor in India.
And if you look at cities like Bombay, you look at cities like Delhi, you look at cities like Bangalore, they're exploding because there’s this global hungry finance moving in to take over the land of people, not through a market mechanism, but using the state and an old colonial law of land acquisition to grab the land by force everywhere where this is happening.
There is a war going on, outside Delhi in Dadri, outside Calcutta in Singur, everywhere.
Peasants are being shot and killed in order to take away the last resort and the last asset of the poor.
The agreements, nuclear and agricultural agreements, came out of a July visit of our prime minister in 2005, were then moved forward in the March visit of President Bush to India, which saw huge protests, by the way — I’m sure it wasn't covered — but huge protests, where these deals, as well as the Iraq war, were the issue in India.
And the two are twin programs.
They are twin programs about a market grab and a security alignment.
AMY GOODMAN:    You mentioned Wal-Mart.   They have just announced they’re going to be opening 500 stores in India, the first to open in August of 2007.
VANDANA SHIVA:    We’ve been organizing the unorganized retail sector of India.
The retail sector of India, to me, is the ultimate practice of democracy.
When you go into a tiny vegetable market, the women put out their mats, they’ve brought the tomatoes they’ve grown outside the city, put it down, maybe five kilos of tomatoes, sell it for the day, go back home, feed their children.
It’s a community market. 400 people dependent on retail, 14 million people dependent on little hawking, you know, a tiny moveable cart, which goes door-to-door.
90% of our vegetables come to our doorstep.
We don't have to go anywhere.
Wal-Mart’s entry into India, 500 stores, cannot go hand-in-hand with the giant retail economy of India, which is giant not by being one big store, but by having millions of small sellers.
And that is what has created the vibrance of India’s markets, the democracy in India’s markets.
AMY GOODMAN:    We're going to have to leave it there.   I want to thank you very much, Vandana Shiva, for joining us.
Vandana Shiva's new book is: Earth Democracy: Justice, Sustainability, and Peace.
 
 
Andrew Kimball GMO Summit October 25 2013  mp3 download
mp3 right click on images for download
GMO bioweapons gene modification and food
Roundup weedkiller found in 75% of Air and Rain Samples — environment saturated with GM agrichemical farming grid
By using genetic methods that are standard procedures in thousands of labs worldwide bioweapons can be made more virulent easier to handle and harder to fight.
Using genetic engineering techniques antibodies from women with infertility have been inserted into genes of ordinary corn seeds used to produce corn plants
What they do not tell the public is that they are using HEK 293 — human embryonic kidney cells taken from an electively aborted baby to produce those receptors.
In 'defense' war programs researchers in the USA UK Russia and Germany have genetically engineered biological weapons agents building new deadly strains
       Antibodies from women with infertility used in creation of GMO food      
       Aborted fetal cells used in research of flavor enhancers      
     Scientists putting genes from human beings into food crops in dramatic extension of genetic modification.      
     Body Burden — cumulative synergistic effects      
The Illuminati —
manipulation of oil energy resources
world rich elite taking advantage
ABIOTIC HYPOTHESIS — Gas Oil
Let the real experts tell us the real story about where oil and gas really come from.
Within the mantle, carbon may exist as hydrocarbon molecules, chiefly methane, and as elemental carbon, carbon dioxide and carbonates.
The abiotic hypothesis is that a full suite of hydrocarbons found in petroleum can be generated in the mantle by abiogenic processes.
And these hydrocarbons can migrate out of the mantle into the crust until they escape to the surface.
Or are trapped by impermeable strata, forming petroleum reservoirs.
Bhopal corporate greed carelessness.

Protest rallies have been held in Bhopal, central India, to mark 25 years since the city witnessed the world's worst industrial disaster.

Warren Anderson head of Union Carbide 1984 was arrested a few days after the Bhopal tragedy, but was freed on bail a couple of days after the chemical plant had spewed its deadly gas over the city.

Warren Anderson head of Union Carbide 1984 jumped bail and fled to the U.S., his neat getaway having been facilitated, if reports are to be believed, by the India Government of Madhya Pradesh, whose capital city is Bhopal, which even gave him a private aircraft.

An American citizen, he remains free and is reportedly living in New York.

On the night of the disaster, when an explosion at Union Carbide pesticide plant caused 40 tonnes of lethal gas to seep into the city of Bhopal, six safety measures designed to prevent a gas leak had either malfunctioned or were turned off or were otherwise inadequate.

In addition, the safety siren, intended to alert the community should an incident occur at the plant, was turned off¡

Union Carbide responded to the disaster by paying survivors inadequate compensation 550 US dollars for each dead person and abandoning the plant, leaving tonnes of dangerous toxic chemicals strewn around the site.

Union Carbide and Dow Chemical leaving the people of Bhopal with a toxic legacy that is still causing injury today.

In 2001, the company changed its name by merging with Dow Chemical.

Photo Internet
Protest rallies have been held in Bhopal, central India, to mark 25 years since the city witnessed the world's worst industrial disaster
Sunday, June 20, 2010

By Gautaman Bhaskaran
South Asia Correspondent
       Photos inserted by TheWE.biz
Over 25 years ago on a cold winter's night, thousands of sleeping people died after inhaling toxic gas escaping from a Union Carbide pesticide plant in the central Indian city of Bhopal.
A train full of passengers at the nearby Bhopal station never moved.
Nobody on it woke up.
More than 10,000 men, women and children went in the first three days of the gas leak, and in the following years, another 15,000 died of complications.
Deaths and debilitating physical and mental impairments still continue, for water and ground remain contaminated by the deadly methyl isocyanate gas, 40 tonnes of which seeped out into a still, windless night.
Warren Anderson given bail in India
Jumped bail, fled to the United States
Even today, about 120,000 people lead a life of suffering.
Bhopal is the worst industrial tragedy in the history of mankind.
Yet, those guilty of being responsible for this have not been punished, not really.
On June 7, after 25 years, a court found eight men accountable and sentenced them to two years in jail.
But they walked out of prison within a few hours, having paid paltry bail money.
All these men were senior officers of the Union Carbide when the disaster struck.
Gave Warren Anderson a private aircraft
But a far greater mockery pertains to the company's then chief executive officer in India, Warren Anderson.
An American citizen, he remains free and is reportedly living in New York.
Admittedly, he was arrested a few days after that fateful December night, but was freed on bail a couple of days later.
He jumped it and fled to the U.S., his neat getaway having been facilitated, if reports are to be believed, by the Government of Madhya Pradesh, (whose capital city is Bhopal), which even gave him a private aircraft.
Anderson never appeared in any court after that.
He never bothered to answer why his company never applied the same safety standards in India that it did in a sister plant in West Virginia, USA.
A Greenpeace International report states:
On the night of the disaster, when an explosion at Union Carbide's pesticide plant caused 40 tonnes of lethal gas to seep into the city of Bhopal, six safety measures designed to prevent a gas leak had either malfunctioned or were turned off or were otherwise inadequate.
In addition, the safety siren, intended to alert the community should an incident occur at the plant, was turned off¡
Union Carbide responded to the disaster by paying survivors inadequate compensation (some USD 550 for each) and abandoning the plant, leaving tonnes of dangerous toxic chemicals strewn around the site, and the people of Bhopal with a toxic legacy that is still causing injury today.
In 2001, the company shed its name by merging with Dow Chemical.
Money must have changed hands
Obviously, money must have changed hands, thought unfortunately it must have gone to the wrong hands.
Six months before the night of lethal horror, the Madhya Pradesh Government had given a clean cheat to the Union Carbide's safety net.
The inquiry, if all there was a real one, was prompted by reports of the company's inadequate or non-existent safety measures.
Some papers had headlined to say that there was a catastrophe waiting to happen.
The Union Carbide's cost-cutting steps had disabled safety procedures, and there were minor leaks between 1981 and 1984 when employees had to be rushed to hospital.
Some even died.
An elderly victim holds a poster and waits for the verdict in the premises of Bhopal court in Bhopal, India, Monday, June 7, 2010. 

Warren Anderson head of Union Carbide 1984 was arrested a few days after the Bhopal tragedy, but was freed on bail a couple of days after the chemical plant had spewed its deadly gas over the city.

Warren Anderson head of Union Carbide 1984 jumped bail and fled to the U.S., his neat getaway having been facilitated, if reports are to be believed, by the India Government of Madhya Pradesh, whose capital city is Bhopal, which even gave him a private aircraft.

An American citizen, he remains free and is reportedly living in New York.

On the night of the disaster, when an explosion at Union Carbide pesticide plant caused 40 tonnes of lethal gas to seep into the city of Bhopal, six safety measures designed to prevent a gas leak had either malfunctioned or were turned off or were otherwise inadequate.

In addition, the safety siren, intended to alert the community should an incident occur at the plant, was turned off¡

Union Carbide responded to the disaster by paying survivors inadequate compensation 550 US dollars for each dead person and abandoning the plant, leaving tonnes of dangerous toxic chemicals strewn around the site.

Union Carbide and Dow Chemical leaving the people of Bhopal with a toxic legacy that is still causing injury today.

In 2001, the company changed its name by merging with Dow Chemical.

AP/Prakash Hatvalne
An elderly victim holds a poster and waits for the verdict in the premises of Bhopal court in Bhopal, India, Monday, June 7, 2010.
Warren Anderson head of Union Carbide 1984 was arrested a few days after the Bhopal tragedy, but was freed on bail a couple of days after the chemical plant had spewed its deadly gas over the city.
He jumped bail and fled to the U.S., his neat getaway having been facilitated, if reports are to be believed, by the India Government of Madhya Pradesh, whose capital city is Bhopal, which even gave him a private aircraft.
An American citizen, he remains free and is reportedly living in New York.
On the night of the disaster, when an explosion at Union Carbide pesticide plant caused 40 tonnes of lethal gas to seep into the city of Bhopal, six safety measures designed to prevent a gas leak had either malfunctioned or were turned off or were otherwise inadequate.
In addition, the safety siren, intended to alert the community should an incident occur at the plant, was turned off¡
Union Carbide responded to the disaster by paying survivors inadequate compensation 550 US dollars for each dead person and abandoning the plant, leaving tonnes of dangerous toxic chemicals strewn around the site.
Union Carbide and Dow Chemical leaving the people of Bhopal with a toxic legacy that is still causing injury today.
In 2001, the company changed its name by merging with Dow Chemical.
And those who died or were maimed for life in December 1984 were mostly poor people, for the pesticide plant was located in a crowded, lowly area, mostly inhabited by workers and their families.
Obviously, their voices were weak, otherwise, how does one explain India's Supreme Court ruling in 1996 that:
...diluted charges against the guilty from culpable homicide to criminal negligence, which carries a maximum jail sentence of two years¡
Anxious not to displease American giant corporations
In India, death by negligence is slapped against those responsible for causing road accidents.
Shockingly, the world's most devastating industrial calamity has been reduced to a traffic mishap!
It is clear that a political will was lacking then, is lacking now.
Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh's statement, delivered last December to mark the 25th anniversary of Bhopal, that:
"the tragedy continues to gnaw at our collective conscience"
sounds as hollow as empty rhetoric.
Apparently New Delhi is anxious not to displease American giant corporations.
Just days after the horrifying incident, India's Ambassador to the U.S. quickly made a declaration to say that it would not affect his country's policy on foreign investments.
In the meantime, there are growing fears that Bhopal will repeat, given that India is opening up its nuclear energy industry to foreign corporates.
Washington has been pressing New Delhi to pass a law that will keep the liability of American nuclear firms in India to a bare minimum.
The brunt of the financial burden would be borne by the Indian State operator!
Indemnify American companies
A Minister, not named, was quoted as having said that the nuclear bill would:
"indemnify American companies so that they don't have to go through another Union Carbide in Bhopal".
However, under widespread criticism by the media (still largely independent and thankfully so) and Opposition parties, the Bill is now being reworked.
Bear-hugged by corporate America, New Delhi's recklessness is indeed appalling.
Seoul Times Articles
© The Seoul Times Company
Light candle for Bhopal victims

Protest rallies have been held in Bhopal, central India, to mark 25 years since the city witnessed the world's worst industrial disaster.

Warren Anderson head of Union Carbide 1984 was arrested a few days after the Bhopal tragedy, but was freed on bail a couple of days after the chemical plant had spewed its deadly gas over the city.

Warren Anderson head of Union Carbide 1984 jumped bail and fled to the U.S., his neat getaway having been facilitated, if reports are to be believed, by the India Government of Madhya Pradesh, whose capital city is Bhopal, which even gave him a private aircraft.

An American citizen, he remains free and is reportedly living in New York.

On the night of the disaster, when an explosion at Union Carbide pesticide plant caused 40 tonnes of lethal gas to seep into the city of Bhopal, six safety measures designed to prevent a gas leak had either malfunctioned or were turned off or were otherwise inadequate.

In addition, the safety siren, intended to alert the community should an incident occur at the plant, was turned off¡

Union Carbide responded to the disaster by paying survivors inadequate compensation 550 US dollars for each dead person and abandoning the plant, leaving tonnes of dangerous toxic chemicals strewn around the site.

Union Carbide and Dow Chemical leaving the people of Bhopal with a toxic legacy that is still causing injury today.

In 2001, the company changed its name by merging with Dow Chemical.

Photo Internet
Light candle for Bhopal victims
Mind Control
As Oswald, Sirhan Sirhan and James Earl Ray so clearly showed, duplicitous action and a compliant media allow the masses to believe whatever the powers who control the world wish.
Today a new strangeness — Mohammad Qasab
First he pleads not guilty, then an outburst in court admitting his role, asking to be hanged.
Now a complete renounciation of all confessions.
It has long been known the bombing of the Taj Mahal hotel in Mumbai in November 2008 was another staged event, the details differing in the choreography, but staged in its own way as much as 9/11, an event that had nano-thermite placed into the WTC interior frame to bring the buildings down.
The Mumbai act set up by foreign agents, the American trail now fully exposed.
Not discussed is the element of mind control — still very much in use on hapless victims.
Kewe
Operation Mind Control — Walter Bowart
book pdf file     right click 'save link, target'
The Invisible Third World War
nonfiction pdf file     right click 'save link, target'
Murder In Plain Sight
Fake Encounter
In Manipur, death comes easy.
In this damning sequence of photos, a local photographer captures the death of a young man, killed in a false encounter by the police in broad daylight, 500 metres from the state assembly.
How can a State justify such a war against its own people, asks TERESA REHMAN of Tehelka.com
If any picture can speak a thousand words, these photos — available exclusively to TEHELKA — could fill volumes.
They capture a shootout that happened in the heart of Imphal, Manipur’s capital, barely 500 metres from the state assembly, on July 23, 2009.
They show the moments before, during and after the ‘encounter killing’ of a 27-year-old Indian citizen — a young man called Chongkham Sanjit, shot dead by a heavily-armed detachment from Manipur’s Rapid Action Police Force, commonly known as the Manipur Police Commandos (MPC).
There is a grotesque and brutal history to the bullets that killed this young man.
For years, decades even, security forces in Manipur have faced allegations of human rights violations and extrajudicial murders committed under cover of the draconian Armed Forces Special Powers Act (AFSPA).
In 2000, Irom Sharmila, stirred by the gunning down of 10 civilians, including an 18-year-old National Child Bravery Award winner, by the Assam Rifles, started a hunger fast — that lasts to this day — in protest against the AFSPA.
In July 2004, the nation was rocked by the protests of a group of Manipuri women who marched to an Assam Rifles base in Imphal, stripped naked and raised a searing banner: “Indian Army Rape Us”.
They were protesting the rape, torture and murder, a fortnight earlier, of Thangjam Manorama, 32, who was picked up from her home at night by the Assam Rifles.
Manipur rose up in protest that day, and in August 2004, the Centre relented, withdrawing the AFSPA from Imphal’s municipal zone.
‘Post-Manorama,’ as history is marked in Manipur, the army has taken a backseat, withdrawing outside the municipality.
However, life in Manipur is still lived on the tightrope.
In a seemingly new counter-insurgency strategy, the MPC has unleashed a reign of terror in the state.
The organisation known as the Manipur Police Commandos (MPC) was first set up in 1979 as the Quick Striking Force (QSF).
Former Inspector General of Police, Thangjam Karunamaya Singh told TEHELKA, “They were trained for special operations.
But the men had strict instructions.
They were told to fire only when fired upon and pay special attention to the needs of women, children and the elderly.
If they arrested somebody on suspicion, they had to take responsibility for their security,” stated Singh.
The MPC does not fall under the AFSPA but has now become notorious across the state.
It operates only in the four districts of Manipur – Imphal East, Imphal West, Thoubal and Bishnupur.
The MPC is housed in isolated commando barracks and has minimal contact with the general population, though its personnel are all locals.
Extra-judicial killings, and, in particular, fake encounters by the MPC have become common in Manipur.
In 2008, there were 27 recorded cases of torture and killing attributed to the MPC.
Where once they conducted ‘encounters’ in isolated places, they now do not think twice before operating in cities, in broad daylight, as they did on July 23.
In several incidents, innocent civilians carrying money and valuables have been robbed and sometimes killed.
In some cases official action has been taken against commandos for misconduct.
For instance, in July 2009, five police commandos who had reportedly robbed three youths were suspended.
But for the most part, their extra-judicial activity goes scot free.
According to the official version of Sanjit’s encounter death at 10:30am on July 23, a team of MPC personnel was conducting frisking operations in Imphal’s Khwairamband Keithel market.
They saw a suspicious youth coming from the direction of the Uripok locality.
When asked to stop, the version goes, the youth suddenly pulled out a gun and ran away, firing at the public in a bid to evade the police.
The official record states that the youth was finally cornered inside Maimu Pharmacy near Gambhir Singh Shopping Arcade.
He was asked to surrender.
Instead, he fired at the police.
The police retaliated and the youth was killed.
The account states that a 9mm Mauser pistol was “recovered”.
The youth was identified from his driver’s license as Chongkham Sanjit, son of Chongkham Khelson of Kongpal Sajor Leikai, Manipur.
Wednesday
11 March 2009
Indian meal starter lasts 50 years
Lajjit papadum production.

Papad making.

Lijjat Papad celebrates 50 years on 15 March
Lijjat Papad celebrates 50 years on 15 March
By Zubair Ahmed
BBC News, Mumbai
Eighty-year-old Jaswantiben Jamnadas Popat defies her age.
She seems more agile and active than her grandchildren.
Jaswantiben Jamnadas Popat.

Papad making.

'I feel I am living in a dream world,' says Mrs Popat
'I feel I am living in a dream world,' says Mrs Popat
"I don't want to stop working," she says with youthful determination.
Mrs Popat is the only survivor of a group of semi-literate Gujarati housewives who founded Lijjat Papad 50 years ago.
She will be celebrating the Lijjat golden jubilee on 15 March with 45,000 other women who are part of the women-only co-operative.
Mrs Popat cannot believe that what started as a desperate move to "supplement the family income" 50 years ago has come so far.
She says after taking a deep breath: "I feel I am living in a dream world. When we started our business it was not meant to become so big."
'Seven sisters'
It is indeed a big business today, with an annual turnover of nearly $100m and a flourishing exports account to boot.
Papads, or poppadoms, are the traditional restaurant starter and go with dips and chutneys. They are a thin wafer of lentil, chickpeas, black gram, salt and oil. Various types of seasonings are added.
The Lijjat trade began when seven Gujarati housewives decided to exploit the only skill they knew — cooking.
Mrs Popat says: "We were semi-literate which restricted our chances to get jobs.   But we realised our papad-making expertise could be used to earn small amounts of money to help our husbands reduce their financial responsibility."
On 15 March 1959, they gathered on the terrace of an old building in a crowded South Mumbai locality and rolled out four packets of papads to sell.
The "seven sisters", as they are fondly remembered, started production with the princely sum of 80 rupees (now $1.50), borrowed from a good Samaritan, Chaganlal Karamsi Parekh, a social worker with entrepreneurial brains.
Lijjat office.

Papad making.

The business has expanded from poverty-stricken shanty towns
Lijjat office
The business has expanded from poverty-stricken shanty towns
Mrs Popat pays handsome tribute to Mr Parekh's contribution to their success story.
"He advised us that if we wanted to experience success, never accept donations.   We have never ignored his advice."
Soon the entrepreneurship expanded in Mumbai's overcrowded and poverty-stricken shanty towns.
Three months later the business had 25 women.   Word quickly spread about the quality and taste of the poppadoms.
The trade began to expand as a co-operative.   In a few years they had branches all over Mumbai and in subsequent years all across India.
Foreign dignitaries visited their factories.
The women received one award after another.
Exports flourished.
They were on a roll — from poppadoms they branched out into soaps, savouries, chutneys and pickles.
Sustainable model
But apart from following the advice of Mr Parekh, what is the secret of Lijjat's success?   After all there are other poppadom makers all across the country.
Mumbai-based businessman and entrepreneur Sushil Jwarijka explains: "Lijjat papads are a perfect example of how a sustainable business can be built, providing large-scale employment to rural women, who are illiterate but skilled.
Jyoti Naik.

Papad making.

These women work here to help raise their children and be financially independent

Jyoti Naik, Lajjit head office
These women work here to help raise their children and be financially independent
Jyoti Naik, Lajjit head office
"And when such skills are given an organisational structure on a co-operative basis a long term sustainable model assures success."
Jyoti Naik, who runs Lijjat's head office in a Mumbai suburb, joined the co-operative 40 years ago.
She says it is the women's sense of financial independence that has made a small enterprise into a big business.
"These women work here to help raise their children and be financially independent," Ms Naik says.
Priyanka Redkar, 35, was just nine when she began rolling out poppadoms alongside her mother.
A deeply family-oriented mother of two children, Priyanka exudes the confidence of a woman who knows her place in society.
"Today I can say I am financially independent.
If my husband doesn't give me any money I can support myself and children.
I don't need to beg and borrow."
Ranjana Khandare was born into the Lijjat family.
Hardships and extreme poverty meant she began helping her mother when she was barely a few years old.
Lajjit production.

Papad making.

The business has expanded from poverty-stricken shanty towns
Lajjit production
Financial independence for the women translates into empowerment
She has no regrets: "All my life I have worked here.   I know no other skills.   But papad-making has made me independent.   I pay tuition fees for my three children and my husband runs the kitchen."
Financial independence for these women translates into empowerment.
Most of the 45,000-strong female workforce live in slums or one-room hutments, with communal bathrooms and toilets.
They are still part of what is known as the working class.
But working for Lijjat Papads gives them financial security.
They are now capable of taking decisions, sending their children to schools and keeping their men on the straight and narrow.
Mr Jwarijka says it has done their self-esteem the world of good.
Indeed the Lijjat women seem to have proved that success does not necessarily need money and infrastructure, as long as there is determination.
© MMIX
Ah!  Palestinians
As the mountains fall around
You will remain
For you are the Rock
Accumulation of wealth — India and corporations — Deregulation

Protest Israel mass war crimes, Palestine.

A Palestine girl paints on a placard at Damascus Gate outside Jerusalem Old City during a protest against the US Israel attack on Gaza, January 11, 2009.

US Israel forces killed at least 27 Palestinians in an attack in defiance of international calls for a ceasefire.

US paid Israel forces attacked Gaza Strip houses, businesses and mosques from the air, land and sea.

NEARLY 1,000 Gaza Palestine people dead, more than 3,500 Gaza Palestine people wounded.

Limbless children, babies blasted into pieces, the wounded dying on hospital floors.
 
'We are wading in death, blood and amputees,' says Norwegian doctor Mads Gilbert.

Frantic families across Gaza sought any shelter they could find as the US Israel army attacked.

The US paid Israel army fires towards populations to cause death and injury.

The US Israel tank, troop and air strike assault on a defenseless people in the Gaza Strip has unleashed worldwide condemnation as moves for an immediate ceasefire was vetoed by the US at the United Nations.

US and Israel continued to attack the Palestine region of Gaza from the air, sea and ground.

More than Fifteen million US dollars is given by US taxpayers each day for this military use, which presently involves the imprisonment of the remaining segregated ' Bantustan — Apartheid ' parcels of land occupied by millions of Palestinian.

Palestinians were forced from their homes 60 years ago from what is now called Israel into refugee camps in Gaza and the West Bank, Jordan and Lebanon.

While attempts have been made by the Palestinians to create a better life for themselves, these refugee camps have been forced upon them to this day by American Taxpayer funding, and Anglo American, Europe backing and banking for Israel that has propped up the forced 'state' of Israel for more than fifty years.

Illuminati, New World Order elite have been at the forefront in protecting European and American settler people who stole the land and continue to steal the remaining few segments of land from the Palestinians, in essence taking away from the Palestinians piece by piece this land over these many years.

Total funding by the US Taxpayer for the enslavement of the Palestinian people is more than 4 billion US dollars per year.

Photo: REUTERS/Ammar Awad 
Israel mass war crimes, Gaza, Palestine.
A Palestine girl paints on a placard at Damascus Gate outside Jerusalem Old City during a protest against the US Israel attack on Gaza, January 11, 2009.
US Israel forces killed at least 27 Palestinians in an attack in defiance of international calls for a ceasefire.
US paid Israel forces attacked Gaza Strip houses, businesses and mosques from the air, land and sea.
NEARLY 1,000 Gaza Palestine people dead, more than 3,500 Gaza Palestine people wounded.
Limbless children, babies blasted into pieces, the wounded dying on hospital floors.
'We are wading in death, blood and amputees,' says Norwegian doctor Mads Gilbert.
The US paid Israel army fires towards populations to cause death and injury.
More than Fifteen million US dollars is given by US taxpayers each day for this military use, which presently involves the imprisonment of the remaining segregated ' Bantustan — Apartheid ' parcels of land occupied by millions of Palestinian.
Palestinians were forced from their homes 60 years ago from what is now called Israel into refugee camps in Gaza and the West Bank, Jordan and Lebanon.
While attempts have been made by the Palestinians to create a better life for themselves, these refugee camps have been forced upon them to this day by American Taxpayer funding, and Anglo American, Europe backing and banking for Israel that has propped up the forced 'state' of Israel for more than fifty years.
Illuminati, New World Order elite have been at the forefront in protecting European and American settler people who stole the land and continue to steal the remaining few segments of land from the Palestinians, in essence taking away from the Palestinians piece by piece this land over these many years.
Total funding by the US Taxpayer for the enslavement of the Palestinian people is more than 4 billion US dollars per year.
Photo: REUTERS/Ammar Awad
Down with Zionist Imperialism
University of Dhaka
Accumulation of wealth — India and corporations — Deregulation

Protest Israel mass war crimes, Palestine.

Teachers of the University of Dhaka carry a banner during a protest against the US Israel attack on Gaza, in Dhaka January 15, 2009.

US paid Israel forces attacked Gaza Strip houses, businesses and mosques from the air, land and sea.

NEARLY 1,000 Gaza Palestine people dead, more than 3,500 Gaza Palestine people wounded.

Limbless children, babies blasted into pieces, the wounded dying on hospital floors.
 
'We are wading in death, blood and amputees,' says Norwegian doctor Mads Gilbert.

Frantic families across Gaza sought any shelter they could find as the US Israel army attacked.

The US paid Israel army fires towards populations to cause death and injury.

The US Israel tank, troop and air strike assault on a defenseless people in the Gaza Strip has unleashed worldwide condemnation as moves for an immediate ceasefire was vetoed by the US at the United Nations.

US and Israel continued to attack the Palestine region of Gaza from the air, sea and ground.

More than Fifteen million US dollars is given by US taxpayers each day for this military use, which presently involves the imprisonment of the remaining segregated ' Bantustan — Apartheid ' parcels of land occupied by millions of Palestinian.

Palestinians were forced from their homes 60 years ago from what is now called Israel into refugee camps in Gaza and the West Bank, Jordan and Lebanon.

While attempts have been made by the Palestinians to create a better life for themselves, these refugee camps have been forced upon them to this day by American Taxpayer funding, and Anglo American, Europe backing and banking for Israel that has propped up the forced 'state' of Israel for more than fifty years.

Illuminati, New World Order elite have been at the forefront in protecting European and American settler people who stole the land and continue to steal the remaining few segments of land from the Palestinians, in essence taking away from the Palestinians piece by piece this land over these many years.

Total funding by the US Taxpayer for the enslavement of the Palestinian people is more than 4 billion US dollars per year.

Photo: REUTERS/Sazid Hossain     

Israel mass war crimes, Gaza, Palestine.
Teachers of the University of Dhaka carry a banner during a protest against the US Israel attack on Gaza, in Dhaka January 15, 2009.
US paid Israel forces attacked Gaza Strip houses, businesses and mosques from the air, land and sea.
NEARLY 1,000 Gaza Palestine people dead, more than 3,500 Gaza Palestine people wounded.
Limbless children, babies blasted into pieces, the wounded dying on hospital floors.
'We are wading in death, blood and amputees,' says Norwegian doctor Mads Gilbert.
More than Fifteen million US dollars is given by US taxpayers each day for this military use, which presently involves the imprisonment of the remaining segregated ' Bantustan — Apartheid ' parcels of land occupied by millions of Palestinian.
Palestinians were forced from their homes 60 years ago from what is now called Israel into refugee camps in Gaza and the West Bank, Jordan and Lebanon.
While attempts have been made by the Palestinians to create a better life for themselves, these refugee camps have been forced upon them to this day by American Taxpayer funding, and Anglo American, Europe backing and banking for Israel that has propped up the forced 'state' of Israel for more than fifty years.
Illuminati, New World Order elite have been at the forefront in protecting European and American settler people who stole the land and continue to steal the remaining few segments of land from the Palestinians, in essence taking away from the Palestinians piece by piece this land over these many years.
Total funding by the US Taxpayer for the enslavement of the Palestinian people is more than 4 billion US dollars per year.
Photo: REUTERS/Sazid Hossain
 
The following by P. Sainath is an opinion
Important to make this distinction from regular news reports — those are 'facts'
Ha!  Ha!  Ha!  Ha!  Ha!  Ha!  Ha!  Ha!  Ha!  Ha!
Oh!  What fun!
Kewe
Thursday, Nov 20, 2008
URL: http://www.hindu.com/2008/ 11/20/stories/2008112055251000.htm
Opinion
The Jurassic Auto and Idea Park
P. Sainath
The U.S. auto giants are an example of how things work in the age of unbridled corporate power.
Of how the collapse of restraint on that power fractures economy and society.
It is unfair to call the United States auto industry dinosaurs, as some now do.
It is certainly unfair to the dinosaurs.
India finance
ministry adviser
The ‘Terrible Lizards’ did not lay the basis for their own extinction or that of myriad other species.
The U.S. automobile companies did — and will take large numbers of jobs, workers and businesses with them.
It is more like the asteroid hit on the earth which is presumed to have fried the dinosaurs.
But that’s unfair to the asteroid.
The U.S. auto giants General Motors, Ford and Chrysler are more a fine example of how things work in the age of unbridled corporate power.
Of how the collapse of restraint on that power must fracture economy and society.
They also set the very standards that the Indian elite lusts to emulate.
Opposed fuel efficiency standards
The original dinosaurs (which scientists now tell us were neither all that terrible nor lizards) were great examples of success and adaptation.
Good enough to rule the planet for 150 million years.
The U.S. auto industry is the opposite.
It’s not just that the Terrible Metal Lizards opposed fuel efficiency standards.
Of course, they did.
They also promoted gas-guzzling SUVs as a lifestyle must.
They cranked out cars many did not want to buy.
They wielded heavy clout in Congress.
And were able to sponge off public funds in the name of saving jobs as they have yet again.
Having received $25 billion earlier, their hats are in their outstretched hands again.
But that’s the easy part.
Destroyed both existing and potential public transport
There’s a lot more they did, as a major sector of industry — and as part of the larger corporate world of the U.S.
Over decades, they destroyed both existing and potential public transport.
The ‘American Dream’ so far as the automobile went was an imposed nightmare.
In Detroit itself, you can see the skeletons of a once alive transport system.
All across the country, for decades from the 1920s, they bought up public transport systems and shut them down.
Trains were shifted from electric to diesel engines.
Sometimes, they were simply done away with and replaced by buses and then cars.
Together with Big Oil, Big Auto converted electric transit systems to fuel-based bus systems.
In one estimate: In 1935, electric train engines outnumbered diesel train engines 7 to 1.
"By 1970, diesel train engines outnumbered electric ones 100 to 1.
And GM made 60 per cent of the diesel locomotives."
The electric rail system in and around Los Angeles was almost erased.
By 2001 90 per cent of Americans drove to work
Fostering the cult of the individual-owned automobile was a major goal.
By 2001, that goal was achieved beyond belief. Some 90 per cent of Americans drove to work by that year.
The findings of the 2001 National Household Travel Survey are striking.
Only 8 per cent households reported not having a vehicle available for regular use.
The survey showed that “daily travel in the United States totalled about 4 trillion miles, an average of 14,500 miles per person.”
Trips by transit and by school bus each made up just 2 per cent of daily trips taken in 2001.
War to deal with perceived threats to oil
Not just a cult but a culture grew around the Metal Lizards and fossil fuels.
Even an economy that goes to war to deal with perceived threats to oil.
(As Robert Fisk often asks: would there have been a war in Iraq if Iraq’s national product had been asparagus?)
Again together with Big Oil, Big Auto for decades crushed all serious moves towards cleaner energy sources.
Everything grew dependent — average American family fifth of income on transportation
Almost everything grew dependent on it.
From agriculture to aviation, individual to national needs.
When oil prices rose (before their present crash) thanks to heavy speculation, countless households in the U.S. were paralysed.
Hundreds of little family trucking businesses went kaput.
People in outlying places who drive many miles to fetch things like bottled water and provisions found their budgets burning.
An average American family in 2004 spent up to a fifth of its income on transportation.
That’s against 13 per cent on food.
In “automobile dependent neighbourhoods,” according to the Bureau of Labour Statistics, that could go up to 25 per cent.
In bigger cities, the traffic only gets worse, never better.
There were over 135 million passenger cars in 2006.
Overall, registered vehicles clocked in at more than 250 million.
Centrality of oil, autos and private vehicles to everything
Imagine the centrality of oil, autos and private vehicles to just about everything.
This is the very model our own Indian elite seeks to transplant.
Private automobiles at the cost of public transport.
Never mind the latter is a lot cleaner and creates large numbers of jobs.
And so we add thousands of such vehicles to the roads each week.
Health costs single cause of bankruptcies
But back to the Metal Dinosaurs of Detroit.
Their asteroid hit will impact on far more than the nearly quarter of a million workers directly stranded on their turf.
There are also more than a million retirees and dependents in trouble.
The retirees now watch their health benefits vanish.
That’s not nice in a country where health costs are the largest single cause of bankruptcies.
At age 75 or 80, it is misery.
Then there are millions of other workers in associated sectors.
In part-makers, supplier companies, in dealerships.
Corporate world would never allow to emerge
The health issue is also vital.
With all its wealth, the U.S. has no decent public health system.
The corporate world as a whole has never allowed that to emerge.
The health insurance mob, Big Pharma, huge corporations in the medical field, and so on.
Take the loss of jobs in the automobile sector to Canada.
One reason is simply because Canada has a much better public health system.
Even GM (which also exists there) has lobbied in the past in that country to see that Canada’s universal health plan was not scuttled!
It has saved GM countless dollars.
Toyota healthcare cost under $300 per car
Each car that GM puts out carries a healthcare cost of around $1600.
For Chrysler, that’s $1500.
But for Toyota, that cost is under $300 per car.
Japan has a far superior public health system.
In the corporate-media of the U.S., this does not lead to calls for a good health system.
Or for making health access cheaper.
Doing away with union contracts granting auto workers health benefits for life
It leads to calls for doing away with the union contracts that guaranteed auto workers health benefits for life.
For retirees, the pullback has already begun.
India exults in emulating the worst of the U.S. model
India even now has one of the most highly privatised health sectors in the world.
Yet exults in emulating the worst of the U.S. model.
The Indian elite boasts of India as one of the hottest destinations in ‘medical tourism.’
Sure, Americans might fly to India to get their surgeries done (which would cost them an arm and a leg in their own country).
But close to 200 million Indians have given up seeking any kind of medical attention at all — simply because they cannot afford it.
Never debate on whether companies should be allowed to get as big as they do
Meanwhile, the logic of “too big to fail” keeps Big Auto and others of its ilk going.
There is never any debate in the U.S. on whether they should have been allowed to get as big as they did.
President-elect Barack Obama says he will aid the auto oligarchs who he calls “the backbone of American manufacturing.”
Sure, with that many jobs at stake, any government must worry about the consequences of letting them sink.
No question about it.
It’s on the basis of that very fear that the Terrible Metal Lizards are able to bargain for handouts from public money.
This economy has lost close to a quarter of a million jobs in the month of October alone.
So the thought of many more simply vanishing is scary.
U.S. has already lost over 1.2 million jobs this year
The U.S. has already lost over 1.2 million jobs this year.
Close to half of those in the past three months alone.
So there is a good chance that more public money will be thrown at the auto giants.
And that, without larger strategic shifts being imposed on them.
Yet, everyone knows this does not mean an industry saved.
They could be back soon with demands for still more.
At which time, with things being even worse (quite likely) the pressure to save jobs by pouring in public money will be still greater.
Media shouted down protest over inflated Corporate executive ripoffs
This is the United States.
The money given out in the bailout so far has delighted the Tuxedo dinosaurs — CEOs and senior executives.
As The New York Times notes ruefully in a lead editorial:
“Just weeks after the Treasury Department gave nine of the nation’s top banks $125 billion in taxpayer dollars to save them from unprecedented calamity, bank executives are salting money away in billionaire bonus pools to reward themselves for their performance.”
Other bailout bandits have held meetings at resorts costing hundreds of thousands of dollars.
Remember the ‘debate’ over CEO compensation in India?
The media shouted down their favourite Prime Minister when he made a few meek sounds of protest over inflated CEO pay.
Well, there too, we were and are on the very track that has helped the U.S. land itself in the mess it now is in.
Welcome to the Jurassic Auto & Idea Park.
[Subtitles and images added by TheWE.biz]
© Copyright 2008 The Hindu
 
Wall Street's Trojan Horse
Dr. Duvvuri Subbarao's inactions as head of the RBI at the height of the crisis, largely contributed to exacerbating capital flight.
by Michel Chossudovsky
Global Research, October 27, 2008
Russia's foreign minister Sergei Lavrov has announced that Brazil, Russia, India and China will "coordinate efforts in overcoming the financial crisis".
The statement suggests that the four countries will confront the dominant US-UK-EU alliance, which personifies Western banking interests, at the forthcoming Summit in Washington.
“We are going to coordinate our moves with the leading emerging economies.
We are in direct contact with India, China and Brazil; we are interacting in the BRIC and RIC [Russia-India-China] formats”
Prime Minister Vladimir Putin said earlier this month the crisis had shown the BRIC nations would be “the locomotive of the world economy in coming years.” (The Hindu, October 26, 2008)
The Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors of G-20 countries will meet in Sao Paulo in November ahead of the Summit meetings in Washington.
The crucial question: Is there a policy alternative to that proposed by Wall Street and the US Treasury, which might emanate from the BRIC and/or G-20 Summit discussions.
Does the BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India and China) constitute a "Strategic Triangle" as suggested by Moscow's official press dispatch?
It is highly unlikely that an alternative might emerge from the BRIC meetings or the G-20.
While China and Russia retain some degree of economic and financial sovereignty, monetary policy in most developing countries including India and Brazil is under the direct surveillance of Washington and Wall Street.
The Prime Minister of India, Manmohan Singh is a former World Bank official.
As Finance Minister in the early 1990s, he carried out the macro-economic reforms imposed on India by the IMF, in close coordination with the Bretton Woods institutions.
Subbarao is insider
The current governor of the Reserve Bank of India Dr. Duvvuri Subbarao is also a World Bank official.
He was appointed at a very critical moment on September 5, 2008 at the very outset of the financial meltdown.
Duvvuri Subbarao spent ten years at the World Bank in Washington.(1994-2004).
Barely two weeks into his mandate as RBI Governor, the Indian stock market collapsed.
Dr. Duvvuri Subbarao's inactions as head of the RBI at the height of the crisis, largely contributed to exacerbating capital flight.
The Proposed BRIC meetings
"Russia will coordinate its steps for overcoming the financial crisis with India and China" said Russia's Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov. The BRIC meetings will be held in Sao Paulo prior to the G-20 meetings:
"Lavrov reiterated that a meeting of G-20 finance ministers would be held in Sao Paulo, Brazil, in the first half of November, during which he also planned to meet with the Chinese finance minister.
Despite the fact that new centers of economic growth, financial power, and political influence have emerged, Lavrov pointed out, different countries must join efforts to seek ways of overcoming the crisis and preventing it from repeating itself in the future.
He also stated that a relevant conference would be held in Washington on November 15.
The conference will be extremely important, Lavrov maintained, as all the main players are expected to be there.
He stressed, however, that it was vital that they didn't merely gather together, but, more importantly, that they also cooperated with each other." (RBC News, October 26, 2008)
What is relationship between these senior government officials
Who will be attending these meetings?
What is the relationship between these senior government officials (Central Bank Governors and Ministers of Finance) and the interests of Wall Street?
The president of Brazil's Central bank, Hector Meirelles will play a key role in the Sao Paulo BRIC and G-20 meetings as well as in the November 15th meetings in Washington.
Trojan Horse
Henrique de Campos Meirelles, appointed head of Brazil's Central Bank in 2003 by 'socialist' president Luis (Lula) Ignacio da Silva, happens to be among Wall Streets' most powerful financial figures.
Prior to becoming Governor of the Central Bank of Brazil, he was president of global banking and CEO of FleetBoston, the 7th largest bank in the US, which subsequently merged with Bank of America to form the World's largest financial institution.
Hector Meirelles is a Trojan Horse.
Appointing the former CEO of a Wall Street bank to head the nation's Central Bank is tantamount to 'putting the fox in charge of the chicken coop'.
During Henrique Meirelles' earlier mandate as CEO of BankBoston (which later merged to form FleetBoston), BankBoston was one among several Wall Street banks which speculated against the Brazilian Real in 1998-99, leading to the spectacular meltdown of the Sao Paulo stock exchange on 'Black Wednesday' 13 January 1999.
4.5 billion dollars windfall in Brazil
BankBoston is estimated to have made a 4.5 billion dollars windfall in Brazil in the course of the Real Plan, starting with an initial investment of $100 million. (Latin Finance, 6 August 1998).
In the ongoing financial meltdown, the loss of Brazil's forex reserves has been dramatic.
Hector Meirelles has, in this regard, served the interests of Wall Street.
In less than a month, some 22.9 billion dollars of Central Bank forex reserves have been lost in the form of capital flight. (Bloomberg, October 26, 2008)
As dictated by Washington Consensus no effective foreign exchange controls in Brazil
As dictated by the Washington Consensus and implemented by the Central Bank under the helm of Hector Meirelles, there are no effective foreign exchange controls in Brazil which might protect the Real from the speculative onslaught:
Sales of reserves to buy reais in the spot market totaled $3.2 billion from Oct. 8 through Oct. 20, central bank President Henrique Meirelles said in testimony before congress late yesterday.
The other types of intervention, including loans and currency swaps, don't affect the level of reserves....
Brazilian policy makers were forced to draw on record reserves of more than $200 billion after risk-adverse investors pulled money out of emerging markets, causing the worst tumble in the Brazilian real since the 1999 devaluation.
The real has lost a third of its value against the dollar since reaching a nine-year high Aug. 1, causing some of the biggest companies to report more than 5 billion reais ($2.2 billion) of losses from bad currency bets.
The benchmark stock index is down 32 percent in the period.
In a decree published today, President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva authorized the central bank to engage in currency swap transactions with foreign central banks.
Officials at the central bank in Brasilia weren't immediately available to comment, according to the press office. (Bloomberg, October 26, 2008)
Brazil bailout of foreign banks — American and European
Moreover, the Brazilian government has emulated the US Treasury in setting up a bailout for Brazilian banking institutions, most of which are in fact controlled by foreign banks (American and European).
Brazil's Finance Minister Guido Mantega will be chairing the Group of 20 (G-20) meeting.
The G-20 countries/union are made up of the G-8 (US, UK, France, Germany, Japan, Canada, Italy, Russia) and the G-11 (Argentina, Australia, Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Mexico, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, South Korea, Turkey) plus the European Union. (The G-8 is the G-7 plus Russia).
Most of the G-11 countries, are heavily indebted to Western creditors.
The neoliberal consensus prevails.
With perhaps the exception of Australia and Saudi Arabia, these countries obey the diktats of the Bretton Woods institutions and Wall Street.
There are many World Bank and Wall Street Trojan Horses, scattered around the World in central banks and ministries of finance.
All under control of Western cartel
The G-20 meetings and negotiations are part of a ritual.
The creditor's cartel, Wall Street and the Bretton Woods institutions are always in on the debate and discussions behind closed doors, with their G-20 colleagues and cronies.
It's 'the old boys network'.
It is highly unlikely that an 'alternative' distinct from the Washington-Wall Street consensus will emerge from the BRIC or G-20 meetings.
© Copyright 2005-2008 GlobalResearch.ca
IMF 2008 meeting

Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke (L)

U.S. Secretary of the Treasury Henry M. Paulson Jr. (2nd-L)

Brazil's Finance Minister Guido Mantega (2nd-R)

President of Brazil's Central Bank Henrique Meirelles (R)

U.S. President George W. Bush (3rd-R) attend the International Monetary and Financial Committee meeting at IMF Headquarters October 11, 2008 in Washington, DC.

Financial ministers and financial institution heads are in Washington for the annual meetings.

Photo: globalresearch.ca/
Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke (L), U.S. Secretary of the Treasury Henry M. Paulson Jr. (2nd-L), Brazil's Finance Minister Guido Mantega (2nd-R), president of Brazil's Central Bank Henrique Meirelles (R) and U.S. President George W. Bush (3rd-R) attend the International Monetary and Financial Committee meeting at IMF Headquarters October 11, 2008 in Washington, DC.
Financial ministers and financial institution heads are in Washington for the annual meetings.
Stop your elite buying U.S. dollars
Don't you know!
The U.S. is bankrupt
The U.S. can never repay the dollars
A tiny cabal of elite has created this crisis
 Saharsa village
Bihar, India
August 29, 2008
Villagers in flood-affected Chattapur town
Bihar, India
August 31, 2008
 Villagers in flood-affected Chattapur town
Bihar, India
August 31, 2008
1.2 million people homeless state of Bihar, India
50,000 homeless Napal
More than 1,000 people have died by flooding since monsoon began in June
In Uttar Pradesh, 785 people lost their lives
Wait to be evacuated Chondipur village, Madhepura
Bihar, India
August 31, 2008
 Murliganj village
Madhepura district, Bihar, India
August 31, 2008
Sunday, 31 August 2008
Indian floods
A woman weeps amid the floods in Trivanigunj, 70km (48 miles) north-east of Patna

India state of Bihar is seeing some of its worst flooding in years
A woman weeps amid the floods in Trivanigunj, 70km (48 miles) north-east of Patna
Bihar is seeing some of its worst flooding in years
Half a million people in the Indian state of Bihar remain stranded in villages which have been devastated by massive flooding, officials say.
A BBC correspondent reports chaotic scenes as soldiers try to reach those cut off and people attempt to scramble from rooftops into rescue boats.
With 1.2 million people homeless, India is struggling to cope with the crisis.
The flood waters are spreading to new areas, and conditions in relief camps are overcrowded and unsanitary.
The floods are known to have killed at least 75 people in Bihar but the death toll could climb once the situation in remote areas emerges.
Tens of thousands of people have also been displaced in neighbouring Nepal where some of those who have lost their homes are camping under plastic sheets.
Disorganisation
Visiting the Bageecha relief camp in Purnea, the BBC's Sanjoy Majumder could find no camp co-ordinator or government official in charge of distributing aid.
Trucks and vans carrying relief material stood parked on the highway as volunteers waited to be organised.
A woman weeps amid the floods in Trivanigunj, 70km (48 miles) north-east of Patna

India state of Bihar is seeing some of its worst flooding in years

Several tonnes of aid had arrived but the volunteers were not quite sure how to distribute it.
The situation was symptomatic of what was happening across Bihar's flood-affected areas, our correspondent says.
The disaster began on 18 August when a dam burst on the Saptakoshi river in Nepal.
The Saptakoshi, which becomes the Kosi when it enters India, subsequently broke its banks in Bihar.
Officials in Nepal say hundreds of people there have been hit by illnesses such as diarrhoea and pneumonia and an estimated 50,000 are homeless.
They say nearly 1,000 houses have been completely destroyed.
Power supplies and transport have been severely affected.
The costs to the economy are now estimated at one billion Nepalese rupees ($14.25m).
MMVIII
Carry belongings Chondipur village
Madhepura
Bihar, India
August 31, 2008
 Woman cries
Murliganj village
Madhepura district, Bihar, India
August 31, 2008
The rich are playing and you are paying
Rich elite setting up derivatives on India Stock Exchange
Cannot get enough of the poison that is causing the fluctuations in food commodity prices and oil prices
It's the rich elite playing the derivative market
The rich are playing and you are paying
 
The international elite cartel running the US government will not make the rich pay for their play
The international elite cartel running Europe will not make the rich pay for their play
The rich elite cartel in India will not make the rich pay for their play
The international elite cartel control everything all the purse strings
They are the one's doing the playing
Watch out India!
India 2017
India Illuminati policy — no cash banks
Fears Grow for India’s Cash-Based Economy as the Effects of Modi’s Ban Begin to Ripple
The 35-year-old mother of four set herself on fire on Nov. 20 last year.
She died two weeks later. She told reporters she did it because her children hadn’t eaten for three days.
       Sheep and cashless banks.      
       Washington Secretly Behind Cash Ban In India       
     Death of a cashless woman in India      
     Razia’s was one of the scores of deaths — Narendra Modi’s decision to scrap high-value bank notes      
India 2014 — Corporate — State corruption
Withdrawing support from the poor to subsidizing elite
A staggering USD 123 billion was lost in the last decade which is 30 times the amount New Delhi spent on social services like health care and education last year
Forced into criminality by a system of governance built on dishonesty, exploitation and greed
Over 75 per cent of slum dwellers report having paid a bribe to secure basic necessities such as kerosene or medical care.
While India’s billionaires wallow in complacent luxury, two-thirds of the population live in dire poverty, almost half the nation’s children suffer from malnutrition and tens of millions, mainly Adivasi and Dalit people have been displaced by mining and infrastructure projects
India 2012
India 2011
Antibodies from women with infertility used in creation of GMO food
IMF through their implementation of austerity policies defacto exploit and loot the wealth of Third World nations and facilitate the long term asset stripping and resourcing stealing of such unfortunate countries
Quite a lot if you look at the whole Capitalist Western system which is rigged to exploit the masses and especially vulnerable Third Word nations in favor of the few, again in the West.
Globalization, Monetarism and Deregulation all sounded so great when they are expounded enthusiastically from the early 1980's, by the USA and their well funded fronts in academia and the global media as a globalist International Banker policy.
Anglicised elite of India lording it up in London, NY and heaven knows where with looted assets.
       Illuminati manipulation of oil energy resources      
       World rich elite taking advantage of middle class and poor      
     India and corporations 2011 — Deregulation, oil price, elite accumulation of wealth      
     In India a bill was introduced to make it a crime to question the safety of GMOs      
Vandana Shiva — Globalization project is creation of corporate states
Rural India — The Deadly Gambles of Farming
ISRAEL MASS WAR CRIMES CONTINUE
January 2nd week 2009
ISRAEL MASS WAR CRIMES CONTINUE
January 2009 — Click here
Oxam America: Free Trade Agreement Bad Deal for Poor Countries
WASHINGTON — April 20, 2005 — International agency Oxfam called on U.S. Members of Congress today to reject the Free Trade Agreement between the United States and Central American countries and the Dominican Republic (DR-CAFTA.)
Oxfam believes that the agreement, in its current form, will do more harm than good and will endanger the livelihood of thousands of small farmers who already live in poverty.
Oxfam joined numerous other non-governmental organizations and Members of Congress from both sides of the aisle at a press conference today, calling for the rejection of DR-CAFTA.
The trade agreement is under consideration by both the House and the Senate and is expected to come up for a vote in the U.S. Congress before the end of May.
"Fair trade rules and practices have the potential to lift millions of people out of poverty, as trade and development are intimately linked," said Stephanie Weinberg, Trade Policy Advisor at Oxfam.
"But DR-CAFTA will only hurt these countries as it puts the needs of U.S. agribusiness, pharmaceutical companies and foreign investors above the basic needs of citizens in the region."
The U.S. trading partners in the DR-CAFTA region, with a population of 42.5 million, are the poorest countries in the hemisphere and have unequal distributions of income and wealth.
They depend heavily on agriculture for the livelihood of significant portions of their populations.
These countries are ravaged by curable diseases due to poverty and inadequate health- care coverage.
They sorely lack public infrastructure and, in several cases, are highly indebted.
Highly unequal societies,
"Those who stand to lose in the DR-CAFTA are the ones who are already disadvantaged in these highly unequal societies, where the majority of poor people live in rural areas, rely on income from agriculture and must pay for medicines out-of-pocket," continued Weinberg.
"Instead of establishing fair and equitable rules for trade, the agreement will institutionalize an uneven playing field."
Dumping of US rice
The regional trade agreement will require these developing countries to open their markets to dumping of US rice and other commodities and forbid use of adequate safeguards to ensure food and livelihood security and rural development.
Monopoly held by brand-name pharmaceuticals
DR-CAFTA imposes strict new rules that extend the monopoly held by brand-name pharmaceuticals, which will limit generic competition and reduce access to affordable medicines in the future.
Special rights and privileges to foreign investors
The trade agreement provides special rights and privileges to foreign investors that can create major new liabilities to governments and undermine efforts to protect public health, the environment, and workplace safety.
U.S. farmers receive extensive subsidies
DR-CAFTA also blatantly ignores the fact that U.S. farmers receive extensive subsidies and domestic supports, estimated to be around $18 billion this year alone.
"DR-CAFTA is a bad deal for millions of farmers, workers, and consumers in Central America and the Dominican Republic and should therefore be rejected," added Weinberg.
"Instead of pushing through bad deals like DR-CAFTA, the US should invest in the WTO and the Doha Round, as that is the best path to build a rules-based trade system that provides more opportunity and stability for both the U.S. and developing countries."

EDITOR'S NOTE: Oxfam's written testimony before the US House Committee on Ways and Means on the Implementation of the DR-CAFTA can be found on Oxfam's Web site at:
NATO's silent toxic air-spraying planes
Chemtrails HAARP and the full spectrum dominance of planet earth.

Image: internet
Climate engineering weather warfare collapse of civilization

Image: internet
“I had a Sunday dinner a few weeks ago at the house of my dad’s and stepmom’s neighbors.
The man and woman of the house are in their 60’s and both proud liberals.
The man said he was a ‘Berkley liberal.’ He supports Hillary, she supports Bernie Sanders.
Towards the end of the dinner he expressed the opinion that a few nuke bombs on some of the major cities in Iraq would be a good idea.
Previous to that, he defended the dropping of nuke bombs on Japan.
The guy’s wife, the Bernie supporter, added something about the barbarous tribal nature of Iraqi society.
She quoted Deepak Chopra on the [evil] nature of Mohamed.
Their son is a fighter pilot who is thinking about joining the top gun program.
He is gay but is too scared to come out to his work colleagues.”
Bi-Polar Disorder: Obama’s Bait-and-Switch Environmental Politics — click here
P.S. from Kewe to the above article written by Paul Street.
I accept the sun is a much greater factor in global weather than human-made activity.
That it is possible climate change will become a bigger problem but also more probable the sun is presently taking us into a mini-cold period.
That the increase in human-made carbon dioxide combined in the stratosphere with other Earth-releasing-of-warmth blocking chemicals is causing a wave of new tree/plant growth in areas not seen for many millennium.
That seeding of the clouds being done by NATO with its toxic compounds is completely destructive to the soil, seas and inland waters beneath, and many vulnerable humans and varied life, and that the politicians responsible for this NATO destructive activity should be held accountable for such as being enemies of Earth's eco-structure and livability.
From the video 'Holes in Heaven' — Brooks Agnew, Earth Tornographer
In 1983 I did radio tornography with 30 watts looking for oil in the ground.
I found 26 oil wells over a nine state area.
100 hundred percent of the time was accurate, which is just 30 watts of power beaming straight into solid rock.
HAARP uses a billion watts beamed straight into the ionosphere for experiments.
Picture these strings on the piano as layers of the Earth, each one has its own frequency.
What we used to do is beam radio waves into the ground and it would vibrate any 'strings' that were present in the ground.
We might get a sound back like ___ and we would say, that's natural gas.
We might get a sound back like ____ and we'd say that's crude oil.
We were able to identify each frequency.
We accomplished this with just 30 watts of radio power.
If you do this with a billion watts the vibrations are so violent that the entire piano would shake.
In fact the whole house would shake.
In fact the vibrations could be so severe under ground they could even cause an earthquake.
Download or watch movie on HAARP — Advanced US Military research weapon on behaviour modification
weather change, ionesphere manipulation — click here
Download or watch audio of Dr. Nick Begich talking on HAARP
— The 2006 update to 'Angels Don't Play This HAARP'.
'Angels Still Don't Play This HAARP: Advances In Tesla Technology'.
Planet Earth Weapon by Rosalie Bertell
ozone, HAARP, chemtrails, space war — click here
What HAARP Is.. And Everything Its Used For
Full HAARP Documentary — click here
Angels Dont Play This HAARP weather manipulation
1 hour 36 minutes video — click here
(poor quality to watch but well worth listening)
Dr. Nick Begich, his book and his articles can be found here
       http://www.earthpulse.com/      
Article on Chemtrails — unusual cloud formations in the US.
      Torture and Bush — White House legal architect Yoo on       

US soldiers committing suicide Afghanistan Iraq — Most Recent
Psychologist Pete Linnerooth was one of three who were part of a mental health crew in charge of the US 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division in the Baghdad area of Iraq.   Pete Linnerooth committed suicide by turning a gun upon himself in January of 2013
Veterans kill themselves at a rate of one every 80 minutes.   More than 6,500 veteran suicides are logged every year — more than the total number of soldiers killed in Afghanistan and Iraq combined since those wars began.
Mary Coghill Kirkland said she asked her son, 21-year-old Army Spc. Derrick Kirkland, what was wrong as soon as he came back from his first deployment to Iraq in 2008.   He had a ready answer: "Mom, I'm a murderer."
A military base on the brink
As police agents watched he shot himself in the head
Murders, fights, robberies, domestic violence, drunk driving, drug overdoses
US soldiers committing suicide Afghanistan Iraq II
U.S. Soldier Killed Herself After Objecting to Interrogation Techniques
Private Gary Boswell, 20, from Milford Haven, Pembrokeshire, was found hanging in a playground in July
She is Jeanne "Linda" Michel, a Navy medic.   She came home last month to her husband and three kids ages 11, 5, and 4, delighted to be back in her suburban home of Clifton Park in upstate New York.   Two weeks after she got home, she shot and killed herself.
Peterson refused to participate in the torture after only two nights working in the unit known as the cage
     United States Numb to Iraq Troop Deaths       
     All papers relating to the interrogations have been destroyed     
      We stripped them and were supposed to mock them and degrade their manhood     
US soldiers committing suicide Iraq Vietnam
The Iraq War — complete listing of articles, includes images
The House of Saud and Bush
       All with U.S. Money:       
       US and Israel War Crimes       
All with U.S. Money:
Israel agents stole identity of New Zealand cerebral palsy victim.
(IsraelNN.com       July 15, 2004)       The Foreign Ministry will take steps towards restoring relations with New Zealand.   New Zealand Prime Minister Helen Clark today announced she was implementing diplomatic sanctions after two Israelis were sentenced on charges of attempting to obtain illegal passports.   Despite Israeli refusal to respond to the accusations, the two are labeled in the New Zealand media as Mossad agents acting on behalf of the Israeli intelligence community.

Foreign Ministry officials stated they will do everything possible to renew diplomatic ties, expressing sorrow over the "unfortunate incident".
Projected mortality rate of Sudan refugee starvation deaths — Darfur pictures
Suicide now top killer of Israeli soldiers
Atrocities files — graphic images
'Suicide bombings,' the angel said, 'and beheadings.'
'And the others that have all the power — they fly missiles in the sky.
They don't even look at the people they kill.'
       The real Ronald Reagan       
       — Nicaragua, Guatemala, El Salvador, South Africa        
Follow the torture trail...
       Photos August 2004
        When you talk with God        
         were you also spending your time, money and energy, killing people?         
       Are they now alive or dead?       
       Photos July 2004
US Debt
       Photos June 2004
Lest we forget — Ahmed and Asma, story of two children dying
       Photos May 2004
American military: Abu Gharib (Ghraib) prison photos, humiliation and torture
— London Daily Mirror article: non-sexually explicit pictures
       Photos April 2004
The celebration of Jerusalem day, the US missiles that rained onto children in Gaza,
and, a gathering of top articles over the past nine months
       Photos March 2004
The Iraq War — complete listing of articles, includes images
       Photos February 2004
US missiles — US money — and Palestine
       Photos January 2004
Ethnic cleansing in the Beduin desert
       Photos December 2003
Shirin Ebadi Nobel Peace Prize winner 2003
       Photos November 2003
Atrocities — graphic images...
       Photos October 2003
Aljazeerah.info
       Photos September 2003
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