Unspeakable grief and horror

                        ...and the circus of deception killing continues...
The object of torture is torture
George Orwell, 1984
US Torture
Kenneth Michael Trentadue
Beaten to death in his cell at the Oklahoma City Federal Transfer Center
Incarcerated for minor parole violation
U.S. Bureau of Prisons tells family he hanged himself
Kenneth Michael Trentadue is beaten to death in his cell at the Oklahoma City Federal Transfer Center, where he is incarcerated for a minor parole violation. The U.S. Bureau of Prisons tells his family that he hanged himself, but upon inspection at the funeral, they discover injuries over his entire body. 

Since August 21, 1995, Salt Lake City trial lawyer Jesse Trentadue has led a small, relentless crusade against Janet Reno, the FBI and the United States Department of Justice.

Prison guards claimed to have found the body of Kenneth Michael Trentadue hanging in a suicide proof cell in the new   

Kenneth Michael Trentadue is beaten to death in his cell at the Oklahoma City Federal Transfer Center, where he is incarcerated for a minor parole violation.
The U.S. Bureau of Prisons tells his family that he hanged himself, but upon inspection at the funeral, they discover injuries over his entire body.
Since August 21, 1995, Salt Lake City trial lawyer Jesse Trentadue has led a small, relentless crusade against Janet Reno, the FBI and the United States Department of Justice.
Prison guards claimed to have found the body of Kenneth Michael Trentadue hanging in a suicide proof cell in the new "Federal Transportation Center" in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.
According to family members who had contact with him hours before he died, he was positive and upbeat about his chances for an early return home.
From the very beginning, Justice Department lawyers have lied about the existence of critical evidence, including death scene pictures.
Federal officials finally admitted that photos existed only after a number of them were leaked to a writer for GQ Magazine, Mary Fischer.
A literal 'swearing contest; erupted between the prison guard who took the pictures, and the FBI Special Agent he swore under oath he gave them to.
The negatives mysteriously reappeared in the Oklahoma City's FBI field office.
A twist in the Trentadue case has this death coupled with both evidence in the Branch Davidian cases and Terry Nichols and Timothy McVeigh and the Oklahoma City Bombing at the Murrah Federal Building in downtown Oklahoma City, April 19, 1995.
Photo: http://www.apfn.org/

Routine and systematic torture is at the heart of America's war on terror
In the fight against cruelty, barbarism and extremism, America has embraced the very evils it claims to confront
George Monbiot
Tuesday December 12, 2006
The Guardian
After thousands of years of practice, you might have imagined that every possible means of inflicting pain had already been devised.
But you should never underestimate the human capacity for invention.
United States interrogators, we now discover, have found a new way of destroying a human being.
Last week, defence lawyers acting for José Padilla, a US citizen detained as an "enemy combatant", released a video showing a mission fraught with deadly risk — taking him to the prison dentist.
A group of masked guards in riot gear shackled his legs and hands, blindfolded him with black-out goggles and shut off his hearing with headphones, then marched him down the prison corridor.
Going to the dentist!
Taken by US government.
Kept locked up for three years, never charged.
Total sensory deprivation for three years.
Total sensory deprivation
Is Padilla really that dangerous?
Far from it: his warders describe him as so docile and inactive that he could be mistaken for "a piece of furniture".
The purpose of these measures appeared to be to sustain the regime under which he had lived for more than three years: total sensory deprivation.
He had been kept in a blacked-out cell, unable to see or hear anything beyond it.
Most importantly, he had had no human contact, except for being bounced off the walls from time to time by his interrogators.
As a result, he appears to have lost his mind.
I mean that his mind is no longer there.
I don't mean this metaphorically.
I mean that his mind is no longer there.
The forensic psychiatrist who examined him says that he:
Does not appreciate the nature and consequences of the proceedings against him.
Is unable to render assistance to counsel.
Has impairments in reasoning as the result of a mental illness, ie, post-traumatic stress disorder.
Post-traumatic stress disorder has been complicated by the neuropsychiatric effects of prolonged isolation.
José Padilla appears to have been lobotomised: not medically, but socially.
If this was an attempt to extract information, it was ineffective: the authorities held him without charge for three and half years.
Then, threatened by a supreme court ruling, they suddenly dropped their claims that he was trying to detonate a dirty bomb.
They have now charged him with some vague and lesser offences to do with support for terrorism.
He is unlikely to be the only person subjected to this regime.
That the US tortures, routinely and systematically can no longer be seriously disputed.
Another "enemy combatant", Ali al-Marri, claims to have been subject to the same total isolation and sensory deprivation, in the same naval prison in South Carolina.
God knows what is being done to people who have disappeared into the CIA's foreign oubliettes.
That the US tortures, routinely and systematically, while prosecuting its "war on terror" can no longer be seriously disputed.
The Detainee Abuse and Accountability Project (DAA), a coalition of academics and human-rights groups, has documented the abuse or killing of 460 inmates of US military prisons in Afghanistan, Iraq and at Guantánamo Bay.
Killing of 460 inmates of US military prisons in Afghanistan, Iraq and at Guantánamo Bay
This, it says, is necessarily a conservative figure: many cases will remain unrecorded.
The prisoners were beaten, raped, forced to abuse themselves, forced to maintain "stress positions", and subjected to prolonged sleep deprivation and mock executions.
Tortured by the U.S.
Taken by US government.
Kept locked up for three years, never charged.
Total sensory deprivation for three years.
The New York Times reports that prisoners held by the US military at Bagram airbase in Afghanistan were made to stand for up to 13 days with their hands chained to the ceiling, naked, hooded and unable to sleep.
The Washington Post alleges that prisoners at the same airbase were "commonly blindfolded and thrown into walls, bound in painful positions, subjected to loud noises and deprived of sleep" while kept, like Padilla and the arrivals at Guantánamo, "in black hoods or spray-painted goggles".
Alfred McCoy, professor of history at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, argues that the photographs released from the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq reflect standard CIA torture techniques: "stress positions, sensory deprivation, and sexual humiliation".
The famous picture of the hooded man standing on a box, with wires attached to his fingers, shows two of these techniques being used at once.
Unable to see, he has no idea how much time has passed or what might be coming next.
He stands in a classic stress position — maintained for several hours, it causes excruciating pain.
He appears to have been told that if he drops his arms he will be electrocuted.
US torturers appear to enjoy impunity, until stupid enough to take pictures of each other
What went wrong at Abu Ghraib is that someone took photos.
Everything else was done by the book.
Neither the military nor the civilian authorities have broken much sweat in investigating these crimes.
A few very small fish have been imprisoned; a few others have been fined or reduced in rank; in most cases the authorities have either failed to investigate or failed to prosecute.
The DAA points out that no officer has yet been held to account for torture practised by his subordinates.
US torturers appear to enjoy impunity, until they are stupid enough to take pictures of each other.
Another glorious American tradition: solitary confinement
But Padilla's treatment also reflects another glorious American tradition: solitary confinement.
Some 25,000 US prisoners are currently held in isolation — a punishment only rarely used in other democracies.
Tortured by the U.S.
Taken by US government.
Kept locked up for three years, never charged.
Total sensory deprivation for three years.
In some places, like the federal prison in Florence, Colorado, they are kept in sound-proofed cells and might scarcely see another human being for years on end.
They may touch or be touched by no one.
Some people have been kept in solitary confinement in the US for more than 20 years.
At Pelican Bay in California, where 1,200 people are held in the isolation wing, inmates are confined to tiny cells for 22 and a half hours a day, then released into an "exercise yard" for "recreation".
The yard consists of a concrete well about 3.5 metres in length with walls 6 metres high and a metal grille across the sky. The recreation consists of pacing back and forth, alone.
The results are much as you would expect.
As National Public Radio reveals, more than 10% of the isolation prisoners at Pelican Bay are now in the psychiatric ward, and there's a waiting list.
Prisoners in solitary confinement, according to Dr Henry Weinstein, a psychiatrist who studies them, suffer from "memory loss to severe anxiety to hallucinations to delusions ... under the severest cases of sensory deprivation, people go crazy."
People who went in bad and dangerous come out mad as well.
Christian? society that believes in neither forgiveness nor redemption.
The only two studies conducted so far — in Texas and Washington state — both show that the recidivism rates for prisoners held in solitary confinement are worse than for those who were allowed to mix with other prisoners.
If we were to judge the US by its penal policies, we would perceive a strange beast: a Christian society that believes in neither forgiveness nor redemption.
Useful to erase a man's mind
From this delightful experiment, US interrogators appear to have extracted a useful lesson: if you want to erase a man's mind, deprive him of contact with the rest of the world.
This has nothing to do with obtaining information: torture of all kinds — physical or mental — produces the result that people will say anything to make it end.
It is about power, and the thrilling discovery that in the right conditions one man's power over another is unlimited.
It is an indulgence which turns its perpetrators into everything they claim to be confronting.
Terror, cruelty, barbarism and extremism
President Bush maintains that he is fighting a war against threats to the "values of civilised nations": terror, cruelty, barbarism and extremism.
He asked his nation's interrogators to discover where these evils are hidden.
They should congratulate themselves.
They appear to have succeeded.
Monbiot.com
Guardian Unlimited © Guardian Newspapers Limited 2006
Emphasis, subtitles, images inserted by TheWE.biz
And the war's second accomplishment — your second accomplishment, sir — is to have taken money out of the pockets of every American, even out of the pockets of the dead soldiers on the battlefield, and their families, and to have given that money to the war profiteers.
Because if you sell the Army a thousand Humvees, you can't sell them any more until the first thousand have been destroyed.
The service men and women are ancillary to the equation.
This is about the planned obsolescence of ordnance, isn't, Mr. Bush?   And the building of detention centers?   And the design of a $125 million courtroom complex at Gitmo, complete with restaurants.
      Keith Olbermann      MSNBC      
“The most traumatized detainees were kept in Delta block.   It was equipped like the others, but its occupants seemed to constitute a psychiatric ward, rather than a prison block.   The prisoners here were truly mentally disturbed.   At any time, at least 20 prisoners were being held in Delta block.
“...cameras were installed along the ceiling and in the back section.   A few cages have been converted into a large office where nurses and guards watched the detainees from dozens of monitors.   Inside their cages, the detainees exhibited a wide range of strange behaviors.
“Many of them acted like children.   I’d stop to talk to them, and they would respond to me in a child-like voice, talking complete nonsense.   Many of them would loudly sing childish songs, repeating the song over and over.   Some would stand on top of their steel-frame beds and act out childishly, reminding me of the king of the mountain game I played with my brothers when we were young.
“Unlike those in the other blocks the prisoners here were allowed the privilege of paper and crayons.   They would lie on the floor or on their beds drawing pictures.   The nurses let them hang the pictures on their cage wall, and every cell was plastered in pastel drawings of animals, the guards, their cells and mosques.   A mental health expert later explained to me that an adult who takes on the attributes of a child is suffering from regressive behavior.   It affects people who have been so traumatized by prolonged stress that they lose the sense of themselves and revert to the mindset of a child.”
      Former Guantánamo Chaplain James Yee
 — For God and Country: Faith and Patriotism Under Fire.
This is what war criminals look like
US Terror State
April 20, 2007
Confined to a Dungeon Above the Ground
Desperation in Gitmo's Camp 6
By NICOLE COLSON
M ore detainees at the U.S. prison camp at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, are so desperate to end their suffering that they are going on hunger strike — willing to risk death if it means an end to their imprisonment.
According to press reports, at least 13 prisoners are on hunger strike in protest of the harsh conditions at "Camp 6," a new maximum-security section of the camp.
Two have reportedly been refusing food since August 2005, while most of the others began striking in January or February.
Most are forced to undergo daily force-feedings at the hands of their U.S. captors — an often brutal and dehumanizing process that lawyers and human rights advocates say is meant to make detainees suffer more.
According to "Cruel and Inhuman: Conditions of Isolation for Detainees at Guantánamo Bay," a report released earlier this month by Amnesty International, the situation inside Guantánamo is actually becoming worse for detainees — particularly the approximately 160 (out of a total of 385) detainees who are thought to be housed at Camp 6.
Abu Zubaydah now suffers seizures that affect his ability to speak and write
U.S. torture —
Horrific force feeding
Extreme isolation
Sensory deprivation
The most evil sadistic end in itself
All personel involved need to be tried, convicted and executed.
According to the report, Camp 6 "has created even harsher and apparently more permanent conditions of extreme isolation and sensory deprivation in which detainees are confined to almost completely sealed, individual cells, with minimal contact with any other human being."
Prisoners in Camp 6 are confined to 8-by-10-foot cells for at least 22 hours a day, and are allowed out only infrequently to shower or to exercise in enclosed areas surrounded by high concrete-and-wire walls.
They are not able to speak to each other except by shouting through a narrow gap at the bottom of their steel cell doors.
There are no outside windows, and detainees have reported that air conditioning is left on high — making the metal cells intolerably cold.
Amnesty notes that U.S. authorities have described Camp 6 as a "state-of-the-art modern facility," which is supposedly "more comfortable" for the detainees, but one detainee said Camp was a "dungeon above the ground."
"They're just sitting on a powder keg down there," lawyer Sabin Willett recently told the New York Times.   "You're going to have an insane asylum."
It's no wonder that some detainees see a hunger strike as their only option.
As 27-year-old Yemeni hunger striker Adnan Farhan Abdullatif reportedly told his lawyer in late February, "My wish is to die.   We are living in a dying situation."
Extreme horror
All personnel need to be tried, convicted and executed
Recently released military documents showed that 13 detainees were on hunger strike—though last month there were at least 17, and lawyers for the prisoners say their clients report as many as 40 people on hunger strike.
All personnel involved need to be tried, convicted and executed
Naval Cmdr. Robert Durand, a Guantánamo spokesman, dismissed the hunger strike and prisoners' complaints as "propaganda," telling reporters that hunger strikes are a tactic taught in the al-Qaeda training manual — and that the number of strikers has dropped in the past when the media stopped covering them.
But Durand left out the main reason the U.S. was able to break down hunger strikers previously — brutal force feedings.
There have been several hunger strikes at Guantánamo since the camp opened in 2001.
The largest occurred in 2005, when at least 130 detainees were classified as hunger strikers — defined as having missed nine consecutive meals.
They force a tube up his nose
Most detainees were eventually broken from their strike through force-feeding techniques — in which they were strapped into restraint chairs, had feeding tubes inserted and then were left strapped down for lengthy periods of time.
Lawyers for some detainees described U.S. military personnel violently inserting feeding tubes to the point of drawing blood, and Physicians for Human Rights called the force feedings of inmates a "brutal and inhumane" tactic that violates international medical codes of ethics.
Sudanese detainee Sami al-Hajj, a former cameraman for al-Jazeera, had been on hunger strike for more than 95 days as Socialist Worker went to press —and was being routinely force-fed.
"At nine o'clock in the morning, they force feed him, and he is strapped to a chair," his lawyer, Clive Stafford Smith, recently told Reuters.
"They force a tube up his nose.
It is excruciatingly painful.
That lasts about an hour...
Three times so far, according to what Sami has told me, they have put the tube in his lung...
And that is effectively drowning him."
Extreme US war crimes
In recent weeks, the Bush administration has pointed to the supposed confessions of several high-profile detainees as proof that the system at Guantánamo is working.
During the start of Combat Status Review Tribunals (CSRTs) for 14 "high-value" detainees last month, Khalid Sheik Mohammed, the alleged "number three" man in the al-Qaeda network, was said to have confessed to:
Being involved in planning for more than 30 terrorist plots.
Including the September 11 attacks.
Personally killing Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl in 2002.
Plotting the assassinations of former Presidents Jimmy Carter.
And Bill Clinton.
And Pope John Paul II.
Walid Mohammed bin Attash is said to have confessed at his tribunal to helping plan the 1998 bombings of U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania, as well as the 2000 bombing of the USS Cole.
Australian detainee David Hicks also entered a guilty plea March 26 to a charge of providing material support to terrorists.
But as lawyers and human rights advocates point out, any confessions from detainees are questionable because of the conditions they've been exposed to in Guantánamo and elsewhere.
Both Mohammed and bin Attash, for example, were "rendered" — sent to other countries known to use torture for interrogations, before being brought to Guantánamo last year.
Additionally, though CSRTs are supposed to determine whether a detainee should be declared an "enemy combatant" — which means they then can be held indefinitely — the process is a kangaroo court.
Defense lawyers and the media are barred from the proceedings, and prisoners aren't allowed to see "classified" evidence against them.
 
US Terror State
'Honor bound to defend freedom'
Confessed when tortured — I think anyone in that position...
Last month, after being held at Guantánamo for more than five years, David Hicks pleaded guilty to a single, relatively minor count in exchange for a plea bargain that will allow him to return to Australia to serve out the remaining nine months of a 7-year sentence.
To get his plea deal, however, Hicks — who has grown his hair to waist length in order to block out the bright lights that shine 24 hours a day in his cell — had to agree to withdraw allegations that he had been abused during his detention, to a one-year ban on speaking to the media, and never to sue the U.S.
"It's a way to get home," Hicks' father Terry told Australian radio.
"He was desperate, he just wanted to get out.
"He's had five years of absolute hell, and I think anyone in that position, if they were offered anything, they would possibly take it
Another glimpse into the bizarre situation of the detainees came when Abd al-Rahim al-Nashiri, another "high-value" prisoner, went before his CSRT on March 14. U.S. authorities claim al-Nashiri confessed to having a role in the bombing of the USS Cole.
Yet at his CSRT, al-Nashiri said he confessed only after being tortured.
Since the Bush administration doesn't allow prisoners to detail allegations of torture publicly
Since the Bush administration doesn't allow prisoners to detail allegations of torture publicly, however, the following appears in the "transcript" of al-Nashiri's tribunal:
PRESIDENT [of the tribunal]: Please describe the methods that were used.
DETAINEE: [CENSORED] What else do I want to say? [CENSORED]
There were doing so many things. What else did they do? [CENSORED]
After that, another method of torture began. [CENSORED]
They used to ask me questions, and the investigator after that used to laugh.
And I used to answer the answer that I knew.
And if I didn't replay what I heard, he used to [CENSORED].
 
US Terror State
Confined to a Dungeon Above the Ground
By NICOLE COLSON
A s the New York Times commented, "Officials defended this censorship by arguing that interrogation methods are so secret they cannot be discussed, even by the prisoner.
But they also said that al-Qaeda members are trained to claim torture, and that Mr. Nashiri lied.
If so, why censor the transcript?...
"Tragically, the most likely answer is to spare United States intelligence agents and their bosses, who could face charges if the Military Commissions Act is ever repealed or rewritten.
The law gives a retroactive carte blanche to American interrogators for any abuse they may have committed."
Unfortunately, the U.S. Supreme Court earlier this month decided not to hear a case brought by several Guantánamo detainees to determine whether the 2006 Military Commissions Act — which took away detainees' right to a trial in U.S. courts — violates the Constitution.
As Vincent Warren, the executive director of the Center for Constitutional Rights, which represents several detainees, said in a statement:
"The Supreme Court has once more delayed the resolution of the fate of these detainees — three-quarters of whom the military admits it will never charge — who have languished without any meaningful way to challenge their detention for more than five years.
"The processes the government put in place are a sham — they allow the use of evidence obtained through torture and no real review of the facts...
We hope our clients survive until they finally get their day in court."
Nicole Colson is a reporter for the www.SocialistWorker.org
March 12, 2007
Kafkaland
The Future Has Caught Up With Us
By PAUL CRAIG ROBERTS
US Torture — mistaken identity
Kenneth Michael Trentadue
Beaten to death in his cell at the Oklahoma City Federal Transfer Center
Incarcerated for minor parole violation
U.S. Bureau of Prisons tells family he hanged himself
Kenneth Michael Trentadue is beaten to death in his cell at the Oklahoma City Federal Transfer Center, where he is incarcerated for a minor parole violation. The U.S. Bureau of Prisons tells his family that he hanged himself, but upon inspection at the funeral, they discover injuries over his entire body.

Since August 21, 1995, Salt Lake City trial lawyer Jesse Trentadue has led a small, relentless crusade against Janet Reno, the FBI and the United States Department of Justice.

Prison guards claimed to have found the body of Kenneth Michael Trentadue hanging in a suicide proof cell in the new

slide cursor here

Kenneth Michael Trentadue is beaten to death in his cell at the Oklahoma City Federal Transfer Center, where he is incarcerated for a minor parole violation.
The U.S. Bureau of Prisons tells his family that he hanged himself, but upon inspection at the funeral, they discover injuries over his entire body.
Since August 21, 1995, Salt Lake City trial lawyer Jesse Trentadue has led a small, relentless crusade against Janet Reno, the FBI and the United States Department of Justice.
Prison guards claimed to have found the body of Kenneth Michael Trentadue hanging in a suicide proof cell in the new "Federal Transportation Center" in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.
According to family members who had contact with him hours before he died, he was positive and upbeat about his chances for an early return home.
From the very beginning, Justice Department lawyers have lied about the existence of critical evidence, including death scene pictures.
Federal officials finally admitted that photos existed only after a number of them were leaked to a writer for GQ Magazine, Mary Fischer.
A literal 'swearing contest; erupted between the prison guard who took the pictures, and the FBI Special Agent he swore under oath he gave them to.
The negatives mysteriously reappeared in the Oklahoma City's FBI field office.
A twist in the Trentadue case has this death coupled with both evidence in the Branch Davidian cases and Terry Nichols and Timothy McVeigh and the Oklahoma City Bombing at the Murrah Federal Building in downtown Oklahoma City, April 19, 1995.
Photo: http://www.apfn.org/
Image inserted by TheWE.biz
John Derbyshire is the sole remaining adult writing for National Review.
In a recent issue he noted that Aldous Huxley's novel, Brave New World, first published in 1932, now reads like contemporary news.
Huxley's fearsome predictions of a 26th century world have all come true six centuries early — in vitro fertilization, genetically modified crops, stem-cell research, promiscuous recreational sex, the demise of marriage and families, and the epidemic use of prescription and illegal drugs to escape from anxiety, frustration and disappointment.
Alas, Franz Kafka's novel, The Trial, published in 1925 and George Orwell's novel, 1984, published in 1949, also have been turned into period pieces by the practices of the Bush Regime.
Hearsay, secret evidence, confession by torture
In Kafka's novel, Josef K. is arrested for reasons never given, tried for an unspecified crime, and executed.
The Trial is the model for the Bush Regime's Military Tribunals, which permit execution on the basis of hearsay, secret evidence unknown to the defendant, or confession extracted by torture.
Without warrants, charges, or access to attorney
For the past five years, the Bush Regime has held people in secret prisons without warrants, charges, or access to an attorney.
Most detainees have been tortured and abused. Bush's real world victims suffer from more disorientation and hopelessness than Kafka's character, Josef K.
In Orwell's 1984, people are subjected to relentless spying.  A state or alleged state of war is used to maintain total control over everyone.  Lies have replaced truth, and the media serves as propagandist for the Ministry of Truth.
The meaning of words, such as "freedom" has been perverted.
The attitude of 1984's all powerful government is "you are with us or against us."
Military Commissions Act — constitutional monstrosity
In the United States, each member elected to the House and Senate takes an oath to uphold the US Constitution, as does the president and vice president.
Yet the Bush Regime drafted and Congress passed the Military Commissions Act, a constitutional monstrosity that denies the protection of law to everyone declared, without evidence, by the executive branch to be a suspected terrorist or enemy combatant.
The Military Commissions Act became law in "the land of the free" in 2006.
The Act strips detainees of protections provided by the Geneva Conventions.
The Act declares that no person "subject to trial by military commission under this chapter may invoke the Geneva Conventions as a source of rights."
The Act also denies detainees the protections of the US Constitution and Bill of Rights: "No court, justice, or judge shall have jurisdiction to hear or consider an application for a writ of habeas corpus filed by or on behalf of" a detainee.
Some language in the Act refers to detainees as "aliens," but, ominously, other language does not limit the Act's applicability to "aliens."
In Orwell's novel, Winston Smith commits a thought crime, is arrested by the Thought Police, and imprisoned in the Ministry of Love.
Winston's dearth of rights under Big Brother are comparable to the absence of rights of detainees under the Military Commissions Act
Regime resurrected medieval practice of torture
This dangerous legislation is the product of the same regime that resurrected the medieval practice of torture of prisoners and that has consistently lied about the reasons for the wars it has initiated.
Scholars, such as Philip Cooper of Portland State University, warn that the Bush Regime is using presidential signing statements to replace constitutional checks and balances with elevated executive powers associated with the unitary executive theory.
The unitary executive theory is a way to turn the US president into Big Brother.
Already Bush is replacing Congress as the arbiter of law and the judiciary as the arbiter of rights.
The media enable his usurpation, and the people, distracted by war and "terrorism," have their various forms of soma.
Predicted present day America
Amazing but true — three novels of the early 20th century predicted present day America.
But the demented psychology of this sad little shriveled-up nothing of a man is of slight import.
What matters are the actions and policies being carried out by the junta operating in his name
uruknet.info
اوروكنت.إنفو
informazione dall'iraq occupato
information from occupied iraq
أخبار منالعراق المحتلة
Compact with Evil: The McCain "Compromise" on Bush's Torture Program
Chris Floyd
McCain Bush hugging 2005
September 22, 2006
A good day for the American people
After George Bush's Rose Garden hissy fit, in which he declared that he would simply stop interrogating suspected terrorists unless he could torture them, John 'I Only Flip-Flop On Matters of Deep Principle' McCain and the other so-called 'Senate rebels' have capitulated to the unpopular president's petulant demands.
In the universe of moral perversion in which we now live, White House National Security (sic) Adviser Stephen Hadley called the pro-torture, anti-due process agreement between these deeply cynical power-gamesters "a good day for the American people."
Here's how the Gamester-in-Chief described it (from the NYT):
"I’m pleased to say this agreement preserves the most single, the most potent tool we have in protecting America and foiling terrorist attacks."
"The agreement clears the way to do what the American people expect us to do — to capture terrorists, to detain terrorists, to question terrorists, and then to try them."
In other words, not until this very day was the American government able to capture, detain, question and try terrorists.
I'll bet you didn't know that.
I'll bet the men who were captured, detained, questioned, tried and convicted for the 1993 World Trade Center bombing didn't know that either.
Really, that's what Bush said; the agreement "clears the way" for the government to actually detain and interrogate terrorists — as if they weren't able to do that before.
A surveillance photo of Hassan Mustafa Osama Nasr taken in Milan, Italy, one month before he was kidnapped by the CIA and renditioned to Egypt. 

25 CIA officers, a U.S. Air Force officer and nine Italian agents have been charged with organizing the kidnapping in February 2003.

His captors offered a deal: They would allow him to return to Italy if he agreed to become an informant.

Hassan Nasr said he refused.   As a result, he said, he was interrogated and physically abused for the next 14 months in two Cairo prisons.

Court papers allege that the kidnapping was orchestrated by the CIA's station chief in Rome and involved at least two dozen CIA operatives, most of whom arrived in Italy months before to lay the groundwork.   Italian judges have issued arrest warrants for the CIA officers and have pledged to try them in absentia if necessary.

Prosecutors in Milan are also investigating allegations that Italian spies offered to give Nasr $2.5 million if he would sign papers saying he had left Italy voluntarily and was not kidnapped, according to Italian news reports.

In a letter to his wife, Nasr described how his health has badly deteriorated.   He has lost hearing in one ear from repeated beatings and his formerly pitch-black hair has turned all white.    He was kept in a cell with no toilet and no lights, where
A surveillance photo of Hassan Mustafa Osama Nasr taken in Milan, Italy, one month before he was kidnapped by the CIA and renditioned to Egypt.
25 CIA officers, a U.S. Air Force officer and nine Italian agents have been charged with organizing the kidnapping in February 2003.
His captors offered a deal: They would allow him to return to Italy if he agreed to become an informant.
Hassan Nasr said he refused.   As a result, he said, he was interrogated and physically abused for the next 14 months in two Cairo prisons.
Court papers allege that the kidnapping was orchestrated by the CIA's station chief in Rome and involved at least two dozen CIA operatives, most of whom arrived in Italy months before to lay the groundwork.   Italian judges have issued arrest warrants for the CIA officers and have pledged to try them in absentia if necessary.
Prosecutors in Milan are also investigating allegations that Italian spies offered to give Nasr $2.5 million if he would sign papers saying he had left Italy voluntarily and was not kidnapped, according to Italian news reports.
In a letter to his wife, Nasr described how his health has badly deteriorated.   He has lost hearing in one ear from repeated beatings and his formerly pitch-black hair has turned all white.   He was kept in a cell with no toilet and no lights, where "roaches and rats walked across my body."
He also gave a graphic account of Egyptian interrogation practices, including how he would be strapped to an iron rack known as 'the Bride' where he was zapped with electric stun guns.
He was tied to a wet mattress on the floor at other times.   One interrogator sat on a wooden chair perched on the prisoner's shoulders and another interrogator would flip a switch sending jolts of electricity into the mattress coils.
The cleric is still imprisoned in Egypt, his wife told Craig Whitlock reporter for the Washington Post.   He has been released under house arrest in Egypt for brief periods.
'What are they going to do with him now?' Abdel Hamid Shaari, president of the Islamic Cultural Center in Milan stated to Craig Whitlock.   'He's a problem for the Italians, the Egyptians and the Americans.'
'I didn't understand anything about what was going on,' Hassan Nasr has written about being seized as he was walking to a mosque in Milan, stuffed into a van and rushed to Egypt in a covert operation that appeared to involve operatives from three countries.  
'They began to punch me in the stomach and all over my body.   They wrapped my entire head and face with wide tape, and cut holes over my nose and face so I could breathe.'
Upon his arrival in Egypt hours later, he said, he was taken into a room by an Egyptian security official who told him that 'two pashas' wanted to speak with him.
'Only one spoke, an Egyptian," he recalled.   'And all he said was, Do you want to collaborate with us.'   Nasr said the other 'pasha' appeared to be an American.
Need to feel someone is being tormented
What he means, of course, is that the ability to torture alleged terrorists — snatched arbitrarily, anywhere in the world, simply on the say-so of the Leader or his designated minions — will be preserved.
Bush obviously has a deep psychological need to feel that someone is being tormented at his orders at all times.
But the demented psychology of this sad little shriveled-up nothing of a man is of slight import.
What matters are the actions and policies that are being carried out by the junta operating in his name — and the countenancing of this gang's crimes by the United States Congress.
Sad sacks of shinola
And that is what we have seen today: the countenancing of torture and kangaroo courts by some sad sacks of shinola lauded by the media as 'men of principle.'
This is what we've come to, this is where are today: sick bastards and cynical bastards openly and eagerly gutting the very core of American law.
Let's have Bill Frist — surely one of the most pathetic creatures ever inflicted on the U.S. Senate and the long-suffering people of Tennessee — explain exactly what this great "agreement" means.
Senator Bill Frist of Tennessee, the majority leader, said the agreement had two key points.
"Classified information will not be shared with the terrorists" tried before the tribunals.
"...the very important program of interrogation continues."
There you have it.
People snatched off the street — or sold to spies by snitches and scamsters — can be tried, in military tribunals, without seeing the evidence against them.
Bush's "program of interrogation continues."
Bush and Tennessee cat-torturer
Let's be very clear on the latter point.
What Bush has been talking about and protesting against were efforts to ensure that CIA interrogators could not torture suspects.
Because of course they could continue to use ordinary methods of interrogation — which experts uniformly agree produce better intelligence — just as they have always been able to.
When Bush and Tennessee cat-torturer talk about the "program of interrogation" continuing, they mean allowing the CIA to torture captives by various methods without being charged with war crimes and felony violations of American law.
That is precisely what they are talking about, and nothing else.
But you won't see it put that way on the pages of our most august journalist institutions nor on the broadcasts of our world-renowned network news shows.
John McCain is a goddamned liar
And let us make one other point — and in a most impolitic way, for the truth is often an impolitic commodity: John McCain is a goddamned liar.
Yes, he himself suffered torture, yes he came through it, yes, we all admire his fortitude during that ordeal in his youth: but his record in later life, in politics, is that of a moral coward with good PR skills.
(Not that it takes much skill to wow the poltroons who squat on the commanding heights of the corporate media world today.)
And today, he has opened his mouth and emitted a damnable lie, to wit: "the integrity and letter and spirit of the Geneva Conventions have been preserved."
This is an untrue statement, analogous to saying the moon is located in his rectum or that he can bite through pig iron with his bare teeth.
Fix the Conventions — gutt their integrity, letter and spirit
Every step the Bush gang has taken in this pro-torture, don't-prosecute-us campaign is designed to weaken the integrity and letter and spirit of the Geneva Conventions.
The Conventions, which have been adopted into American law by Congress — in bills sponsored and championed by Republicans — are crystal clear on torture.
There is no need to "preserve" their integrity with new legislation; there is nothing wrong with the Conventions that need to be "fixed."
Unless, of course, you wish to use interrogation techniques that any sentient human being would recognize as torture.
In that case, of course you have to "fix" the Conventions by gutting their integrity, letter and spirit.
Most evil principles ever supported openly by the United States government since slavery
John McCain might be a moral coward in his old age, but he's not stupid.
He knows all this.
He knows that the Bush Administration has been trying to wriggle out of the Conventions since the earliest days of the 'War of Terror.'
He knows that gutting the Conventions is at the heart of Bush's 'interrogation program' which McCain and his 'rebels' have just saved with their grand 'compromise.'
Therefore, we will say it again clearly, so that even the nabobs on the Washington Post editorial page can hear it:
— John McCain is a goddamned liar, and his 'agreement' today serves some of the most evil principles ever supported openly by the United States government since slavery.
And let's put this other point plainly one more time:
The American government has always been able to capture, detain, question and try terrorists.
Always.
The American government has for 28 years had the power to eavesdrop on anyone in the world or in the country whom they suspected even slightly of terrorism or terrorist connections.
And they could and can do that instantly, without waiting for a court order or jumping through any bureaucratic hoops, under the long-existing law.
Everything that Bush says his clearly illegal surveillance programs do can already be done within the law.
Therefore, it is clear that the whole raison d'etre behind the illegal programs is to establish the principle that the president is beyond the law.
(And also, almost certainly, to perform illegal surveillance that has nothing to do with terrorism.)
What we have seen today is no "grand compromise," no "great debate," no "act of principle" and certainly no "preservation" of the Geneva Conventions.
What we have seen instead is a small group of rich, cynical, power-hungry old bastards belch forth lies in the service of torture and tyranny.
And if you're not angry about that.
If you're not "shrill" about that.
Then by God you are one piss-poor American citizen.
You shame every man and woman who have fought and died and marched and worked and dreamed for our freedoms.
      Clawman —      
     US torture Abu Ghraib, Bagram, Guantánamo       
Gitmo Guards Brag of Beatings
CAMP PENDLETON, Calif. (AP) — Guards at Guantánamo Bay bragged about beating detainees and described it as common practice, a Marine sergeant said in a sworn statement obtained by The Associated Press.
The two-page statement was sent Wednesday to the Inspector General at the Department of Defense by a high-ranking Marine Corps defense lawyer.
The lawyer sent the statement on behalf of a paralegal who said men she met on Sept. 23 at a bar on the base identified themselves to her as guards.   The woman, whose name was blacked out, said she spent about an hour talking with them.   No one was in uniform, she said.
A 19-year-old sailor referred to only as Bo "told the other guards and me about him beating different detainees being held in the prison," the statement said.
Bo told of him taking a detainee by the head and hitting the detainee's head into the cell door.   Bo said that his actions were known by others," the statement said.
The sailor said he was never punished.
"About 5 others in the group admitted hitting detainees" and that included "punching in the face," the affidavit said.
"From the whole conversation, I understood that striking detainees was a common practice," the sergeant wrote.
"Everyone in the group laughed at the others stories of beating detainees."
      AP — Thomas Watkins       Oct, 6 2006      
Published on Thursday, October 20, 2005 by the Associated Press
Guantánamo Hunger Strikers Say Feeding Tubes Employed as Torture
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico — Prisoners on hunger strike at the U.S. prison camp at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, reported troops force-fed them with dirty feeding tubes that have been violently inserted and withdrawn as punishment, said declassified notes released Wednesday by defence lawyers.
The repeated removal and insertion of the tubes has caused striking prisoners to vomit blood and experience intense pain they have equated with torture, the lawyers reported to a U.S. federal judge after visiting their clients at the base in eastern Cuba.
Prisoners said they were taunted by troops who said the treatment was intended to persuade them to end the hunger strike that began Aug. 9, the lawyers wrote in affidavits filed as part of a lawsuit in federal court in Washington seeking greater access to prisoners at the high-security jail for terror suspects.
Lt.-Col. Jeremy Martin, a military spokesman for the Guantánamo detention centre, said all detainees in the hunger strike are closely monitored by medical personnel and mistreatment is not tolerated, though he did not know the specific procedures for handling the feeding tubes.
"Detainees...are treated humanely," Martin said.
"Claims to the contrary are wholly inaccurate and blatantly misrepresent the excellent work being done here by honourable military and civilian professionals."
Guantánamo officials have said this latest hunger strike began with 76 detainees protesting against their confinement.   Defence lawyers have cited other reasons as well, including complaints about food and water, alleged abuse by guards and interrogators and their desire to either face trial or be released.
Yousef al Shehri, 21, of Saudi Arabia, told his lawyers guards removed a nasal feeding tube from one prisoner and reinserted it into another without cleaning it first.
"These large tubes...were viewed by the detainees as objects of torture," lawyer Julia Tarver, whose firm represents 10 Saudi detainees, said in an affidavit.
"They were forcibly shoved up the detainees' noses and down into their stomachs."
At Guantánamo Bay, the U.S. military holds about 500 detainees suspected of terrorist activities.   Martin said 25 detainees are on hunger strike, including 22 who are being force-fed.
The number participating in the strike reached a high of 131 in mid-September when detainees refused meals to commemorate the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks in the United States, Martin said.
Most detainees participating in the hunger strike are not confined to hospital beds and are permitted to exercise, take showers, send and receive mail, visit the detainee library and practise their religion, he said.
Defence lawyers who have visited the prison in recent weeks said their clients have lost substantial weight, appeared listless and depressed — and have insisted they will maintain the protest until conditions improve or they are released.   A judge has not yet ruled on their request for increased access to the detainees and their medical records.
Notes of meetings between lawyers and their clients at the detention centr eare classified until they have been reviewed by the military and cleared for release.
Joshua Colangelo-Ryan, a lawyer for six men from Bahrain, said one of his clients, Isa al Murbati, has lost about 50 pounds as a result of the hunger strike.
"There's nothing in my mind that he intends to stop the hunger strike," said Colangelo-Ryan, who returned from Guantánamo on Monday.
Tarver, who returned from the base Oct. 2, said two of her clients were being force-fed and unable to walk.
"It's quite a drastic situation," she said.
slide cursor underneath or side of photos
Scandal of force-fed prisoners
Hunger strikers are tied down and fed through nasal tubes, admits Guantánamo Bay doctor
New details have emerged of how the growing number of prisoners on hunger strike at Guantánamo Bay are being tied down and force-fed through tubes pushed down their nasal passages into their stomachs to keep them alive.
They routinely experience bleeding and nausea, according to a sworn statement by the camp's chief doctor, seen by The Observer.
The London solicitors Allen and Overy, who represent some of the hunger strikers, have lodged a court action to be heard next week in California, where Edmondson [John S Edmondson, commander of Guantánamo's hospital] is registered to practise.
They are asking for an order that the state medical ethics board investigate him for 'unprofessional conduct' for agreeing to the force-feeding.
Edmonson's affidavit, in response to a lawsuit on behalf of detainees on hunger strike since last August, was obtained last week by The Observer, as a Guantánamo spokesman confirmed that the number of hunger strikers has almost doubled since Christmas, to 81 of the 550 detainees.
Many have been held since the camp opened four years ago this month, although they not been charged with any crime, nor been allowed to see any evidence justifying their detention.
Article 5 of the 1975 World Medical Association Tokyo Declaration, which US doctors are legally bound to observe through their membership of the American Medical Association, states that doctors must not undertake force-feeding under any circumstances.
Dr David Nicholl, a consultant neurologist at Queen Elizabeth's hospital in Birmingham, is co-ordinating opposition to the Guantánamo doctors' actions from the international medical community.
'If I were to do what Edmondson describes in his statement, I would be referred to the General Medical Council and charged with assault,' he said.
      George Orwell 1984      
      The UK Observer      Sunday January 8, 2006      
Prisoners At Camp X-Ray, Guantanamo Bay.

Kept for three or more years.

Torture reports increasingly being heard. 

None have been charged.

Photo: Scoop/US Department of Defence
Prisoners At Camp X-Ray, Guantánamo Bay.   Kept for three or more years.   Tortured.   None have been charged.
U.S. Operatives Killed Detainees During Interrogations in Afghanistan and Iraq — CIA, Navy Seals and Military Intelligence Personnel Implicated.
For Immediate Release   American Civil Liberties Union   OCTOBER 24, 2005
NEW YORK — The American Civil Liberties Union today made public an analysis of new and previously released autopsy and death reports of detainees held in U.S. facilities in Iraq and Afghanistan, many of whom died while being interrogated.
The documents show that detainees were hooded, gagged, strangled, beaten with blunt objects, subjected to sleep deprivation and to hot and cold environmental conditions.
“There is no question that U.S. interrogations have resulted in deaths,” said Anthony D. Romero, Executive Director of the ACLU. “High-ranking officials who knew about the torture and sat on their hands and those who created and endorsed these policies must be held accountable. America must stop putting its head in the sand and deal with the torture scandal that has rocked our military.”
The documents released today include 44 autopsies and death reports as well as a summary of autopsy reports of individuals apprehended in Iraq and Afghanistan.
The documents show that detainees died during or after interrogations by Navy Seals, Military Intelligence and “OGA” (Other Governmental Agency) — a term, according to the ACLU, that is commonly used to refer to the CIA.
According to the documents, 21 of the 44 deaths were homicides.
Eight of the homicides appear to have resulted from abusive techniques used on detainees, in some instances, by the CIA, Navy Seals and Military Intelligence personnel.
The autopsy reports list deaths by “strangulation,” “asphyxiation” and “blunt force injuries.”
An overwhelming majority of the so-called “natural deaths” were attributed to “Arteriosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease.”
While newspapers have recently reported deaths of detainees in CIA custody, today’s documents show that the problem is pervasive, involving Navy Seals and Military Intelligence too.
The records reveal the following facts:
A 27-year-old Iraqi male died while being interrogated by Navy Seals on April 5, 2004, in Mosul, Iraq.
During his confinement he was hooded, flex-cuffed, sleep deprived and subjected to hot and cold environmental conditions, including the use of cold water on his body and hood.
The exact cause of death was “undetermined” although the autopsy stated that hypothermia may have contributed to his death.
Notes say he “struggled/ interrogated/ died sleeping.”
Some facts relating to this case have been previously reported.
(In April 2003, Secretary Rumsfeld authorized the use of “environmental manipulation” as an interrogation technique in Guantánamo Bay.
In September 2003, Lt. Gen. Sanchez also authorized this technique for use in Iraq.
Although Lt. Gen. Sanchez later rescinded the September 2003 techniques, he authorized “changes in environmental quality” in October 2003.)
Image inserted by TheWE.biz
Iraqi mother of Nadhem Abdullah holds his picture in Farakah.
A court hearing the case of seven British troops accused of beating Abdullah to death, also heard that the same soldiers savagely attacked a taxi driver at the same time.
Charges against the seven British soldiers accused of murdering Iraqi teenager dismissed.      Judge ruled insufficient evidence — November 3, 2005

Torture of Iraqis was for ‘stress relief’, say US soldiers
Neil Mackay investigates
For the first time, American soldiers who personally tortured Iraqi prisoners have come forward to give testimony to human rights organisations about crimes they committed.
Three soldiers — a captain and two sergeants — from the 82nd Airborne Division stationed at Forward Operating Base (FOB) Mercury near Fallujah in Iraq have told Human Rights Watch how prisoners were tortured both as a form of stress relief and as a way of breaking them for interrogation sessions.
These latest revelations about the torture of Iraqi detainees come at a time when the Bush administration thought it could draw a line under the scandal of Abu Ghraib following last week’s imprisonment of Private Lynndie England for her now infamous role in the abuse of prisoners and the photographing of torture.
The 82nd Airborne soldiers at FOB Mercury earned the nickname “The Murderous Maniacs” from local Iraqis and took the moniker as a badge of honour.
The soldiers referred to their Iraqi captives as PUCs — persons under control — and used the expressions “f***ing a PUC” and “smoking a PUC” to refer respectively to torture and forced physical exertion.
One sergeant provided graphic descriptions to Human Rights Watch investigators about acts of abuse carried out both by himself and others.   He now says he regrets his actions.   His regiment arrived at FOB Mercury in August 2003.   He said: “ The first interrogation that I observed was the first time I saw a PUC pushed to the brink of a stroke or a heart attack.   At first I was surprised, like, ‘This is what we are allowed to do?’”
The troops would put sand-bags on prisoners’ heads and cuff them with plastic zip-ties.   The sergeant, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said if he was told that prisoners had been found with homemade bombs, “we would f*** them up, put them in stress positions and put them in a tent and withhold water … It was like a game.   You know, how far could you make this guy go before he passes out or just collapses on you?”
He explained: “To ‘f*** a PUC’ means to beat him up.   We would give them blows to the head, chest, legs and stomach, pull them down, kick dirt on them.   This happened every day.   To ‘smoke’ someone is to put them in stress positions until they get muscle fatigue and pass out.   That happened every day.
“Some days we would just get bored so we would have everyone sit in a corner and then make them get in a pyramid.   We did that for amusement.”
Iraqis were “smoked” for up to 12 hours.   That would entail being made to hold five-gallon water cans in both hands with out-stretched arms, made to do press-ups and star jumps.   At no time, during these sessions, would they get water or food apart from dry biscuits.   Sleep deprivation was also “a really big thing”, the sergeant added.
To prepare a prisoner for interrogation, military intelligence officers ordered that the Iraqis be deprived of sleep.   The sergeant said he and other soldiers did this by “banging on their cages, crashing them into the cages, kicking them, kicking dirt, yelling”.
They’d also pour cold water over prisoners and then cover them in sand and mud.   On some occasions, prisoners were tortured for revenge.   “If we were on patrol and caught a guy that killed our captain or my buddy last week … man, it is human nature,” said the sergeant — but on other occasions, he confessed, it was for “sport”.
Many prisoners were completely innocent and had no part in the insurgency, he said — but intelligence officers had told soldiers to exhaust the prisoners to make them co-operate.   He said he now knew their behaviour was “wrong”, but added “this was the norm”.   “Trends were accepted.   Leadership failed to provide clear guidance so we just developed it.   They wanted intel [intelligence].   As long as no PUC came up dead, it happened.”
According to Captain Ian Fishback of the 82nd Airborne Division, army doctrine had been broken by allowing Iraqis who were captured by them to remain in their custody, instead of being sent “behind the lines” to trained military police.
Pictures of abuse at FOB Mercury were destroyed by soldiers after the scandal of Abu Ghraib broke.
However, Fishback told his company commander about the abuse and was told “remember the honour of the unit is at stake” and “don’t expect me to go to bat for you on this issue if you take this up”.   Fishback then told his battalion commander who advised him to speak to the Judge Advocate General’s (JAG) office, which deals with issues of military law.
The JAG told Fishback that the Geneva Conventions “are a grey area”.   When Fishback described some of the abuses he had witnessed the JAG said it was “within” Geneva Conventions.
Fishback added: “ If I go to JAG and JAG cannot give me clear guidance about what I should stop and what I should allow to happen, how is an NCO or a private expected to act appropriately?”
Fishback, a West Point graduate who has served in both Afghanistan and Iraq, spent 17 months trying to raise the matter with his superiors.   When he attempted to approach representatives of US Senators John McCain and John Warner about the abuse, he was told that he would not be granted a pass to meet them on his day off.
Fishback says that army investigators were currently more interested in finding out the identity of the other soldiers who spoke to Human Rights Watch than dealing with the systemic abuse of Iraqi prisoners.
Colonel Joseph Curtin, a senior army spokesman at the Pentagon, said: “We do take the captain seriously and are following up on this.”
Fishback has now been removed from special forces training because of the army investigation.
02 October 2005
© 2002 newsquest (sunday herald) limited. all rights reserved
Compilation of two articles published on 10/4/2005 by www.aljazeera.com/  and   Newsday 10/3/2005 (without images)
“They blinded me”

The allegations read like a deranged horror novel.
First, prisoner Omar Deghayes said, he was tortured with electric shocks and placed in a room with caged snakes in Pakistan.   He likens his next stop, a U.S. military base in Afghanistan, to a "Nazi camp."
And at the U.S. military base at Guantánamo Bay, he says, troops marched into his cellblock "singing and laughing" before spraying his face with mace and digging their fingers into his eyes as an officer shouted "More!   More!"
He says his right eye, already weak from a childhood accident, has been blind ever since.
Hypocrisy and a disregard for basic human rights and international laws continue to mark the American President’s so-called “war on terror".
Below are details of one of the most horrific incidents that took place at the U.S. Naval Base in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, where American soldiers tortured and abused prisoners, whom they labeled enemy-combatants.
Omar Deghayes is a British resident who has been tortured by U.S. guards at Guantánamo Bay, suffering violent sexual assaults, near drowning and an attack in which he was blinded.
Deghayes said the soldiers tortured him using electric shocks.   They also put him in a room with caged snakes when he was in Pakistan before he was taken later to Guantánamo.

Photo: www.aljazeera.com/
Deghayes said the soldiers tortured him using electric shocks
Deghayes was first jailed in a U.S.-run jail in Afghanistan, which he likened to a "Nazi camp."
And at the U.S. detention center at Guantánamo Bay, Deghayes said the prison guards came to his cell "singing and laughing" before spraying his face with mace and digging their fingers into his eyes while an officer shouted "More!   More."
Deghayes’ right eye has been blind ever since, he wrote in recently declassified notes.
The assault "was the saddest, my eye has gone a milky white color ... After all I have been through in my life to save it," he said.
In his prison notes, Deghayes said troops pushed their fingers in his eyes in 2003 because he refused a rectal search — a controversial procedure at Guantánamo.
Among other abuses Deghayes detailed was having his head flushed in a toilet, feces smeared on his face and water forced up his nose with a pressure hose.
At the "Nazi camp" in Baghram, he said soldiers kept him naked, threatened him with sodomy, and chained him to a wall with his hands high above his head.
Omar Deghayes
<br>
Photo: www.aljazeera.com/
Omar
Deghayes
Deghayes said that in Pakistan, he was repeatedly subjected to electric shocks and dunked into a tub of water until he nearly drowned.
The room "had very large snakes in glass boxes ... with dim lights," he wrote.   "They threatened to leave me there, and let the snakes out."
The accusations, made by Deghayes’ attorney and human rights lawyer Clive Stafford Smith, finally persuaded British ministers to take up his case.
Deghayes’ testimony was recorded during interviews with his attorney at Guantánamo jail in March this year, and has only recently been cleared by U.S. Department of Justice censors.
Mr Smith asserted that Deghayes’ testimony is “totally credible”.
“He has been treated worse in Guantánamo than any other person I have come across.   He is legally trained and tries to help other people there, so the Americans think he’s a trouble-maker.   Consequently, he’s suffered for it,” he said.
Mistaken Identity
According to Stafford Smith, Deghayes was the victim of mistaken identity.   They had established that video footage showing Deghayes in Chechnya was of another man, now dead.
The U.S. attorney said that his client had never been to Chechnya.
Deghayes was arrested by armed local intelligence officers in Pakistan in April 2002, and was immediately subjected to repeated torture, threats against his wife and children, and violent assaults by the Pakistani interrogators who told him they were holding him at U. S. request.
“I underwent systematic beatings every night for three days.   Each time, when I was nearly unconscious, I would be thrown back into the cell to await more.”
As evidence of torture and widespread brutal and inhuman treatment of detainees mounts, it’s become more urgent than ever that the U.S. brings the Guantánamo prison and any other detention center it runs in any country into full compliance with international law and standards.   Many politicians suggested closing them down.
Deghayes' attorney Clive Stafford Smith was awarded an OBE for “humanitarian services” for working on behalf of defendants facing the death penalty in the southern United States the last 25 years.   He returned to Britain in 2004 to assist in due process for Guantánamo Bay detainees. Stafford Smith says his client isn't asking anyone to take his word.   "He only asks for an independent investigation, which will establish what he says is true."
From Newsday October 3, 2005 — By Letta Tayler and www.aljazeera.com/ October 4, 2005
Site of My Lai massacre
The U.S. Government went into the village of My Lai and murdered 504 innocent Vietnamese civilians.
It was a U.S. military operation.
Lt. William Calley was the fall guy.
Another Anniversary of The My Lai Massacre
 
On March 16, 1968, the U.S. Government went into the village of My Lai and murdered 504 innocent Vietnamese civilians.

It was a U.S. military operation.

Lt. William Calley was the fall guy.

Fast forward 39 years and nothing has changed.

Fall guys keep coming out of the woodwork.

Photograph:
 
The monument at My Lai, taken in 1994.

After taking pictures for an hour at the massacre site, especially at the War Crimes Museum, I finally broke down.

Lying Is The Most Powerful Weapon In War.
Mike Hastie 
 
Photo and words: Mike Hastie
Vietnam Veteran
March 16, 2007     

Another Anniversary of The My Lai Massacre
On March 16, 1968, the U.S. Government went into the village of My Lai and murdered 504 innocent Vietnamese civilians.
It was a U.S. military operation.
Lt. William Calley was the fall guy.
Fast forward and nothing has changed.
Fall guys keep coming out of the woodwork.
Photograph:
The monument at My Lai, taken in 1994.
After taking pictures for an hour at the massacre site, especially at the War Crimes Museum, I finally broke down.
Lying Is The Most Powerful Weapon In War.
Mike Hastie
Photo and words: Mike Hastie
Vietnam Veteran
March 16, 2007
      Clawman —      
     US torture Abu Ghraib, Bagram, Guantánamo       
U.S. Operatives Killed Detainees During Interrogations in Afghanistan and Iraq — CIA, Navy Seals and Military Intelligence Personnel Implicated.
For Immediate Release   American Civil Liberties Union   OCTOBER 24, 2005
The records reveal the following facts:
An Iraqi detainee (also described as a white male) died on January 9, 2004, in Al Asad, Iraq, while being interrogated by “OGA.”
He was standing, shackled to the top of a door frame with a gag in his mouth at the time he died.
The cause of death was asphyxia and blunt force injuries.
Notes summarizing the autopsies record the circumstances of death as “Q by OGA, gagged in standing restraint.”
(Facts in the autopsy report appear to match the previously reported case of Abdul Jaleel.)
May 9, 2005
America's Shame, Two Years on from "Mission Accomplished"
by Robert Fisk
Bush

Photo: AFP/Brendan Smialowski
Bush
Two years after "Mission Accomplished", whatever moral stature the United States could claim at the end of its invasion of Iraq has long ago been squandered in the torture and abuse and deaths at Abu Ghraib.
That the symbol of Saddam Hussein's brutality should have been turned by his own enemies into the symbol of their own brutality is a singularly ironic epitaph for the whole Iraq adventure.
We have all been contaminated by the cruelty of the interrogators and the guards and prison commanders.
But this is not only about Abu Ghraib.
There are clear and proven connections now between the abuses at Abu Ghraib and the cruelty at the American's.
Bargain prison in Afghanistan and Guantánamo Bay.   Curiously, General Janis Karpinski, the only senior US officer facing charges over Abu Ghraib, admitted to me a year earlier when I visited the prison that she had been at Guantánamo Bay, but that at Abu Ghraib she was not permitted to attend interrogations - which seems very odd.
A vast quantity of evidence has now been built up on the system which the Americans have created for mistreating and torturing prisoners.
I have interviewed a Palestinian who gave me compelling evidence of anal rape with wooden poles at Bagram — by Americans, not by Afghans.
Many of the stories now coming out of Guantánamo — the sexual humiliation of Muslim prisoners, their shackling to seats in which they defecate and urinate, the use of pornography to make Muslim prisoners feel impure, the female interrogators who wear little clothing (or, in one case, pretended to smear menstrual blood on a prisoner's face) — are increasingly proved true.
Iraqis whom I have questioned at great length over many hours, speak with candor of terrifying beatings from military and civilian interrogators, not just in Abu Ghraib but in US bases elsewhere in Iraq.
At the American camp outside Fallujah, prisoners are beaten with full plastic water bottles which break, cutting the skin.   At Abu Ghraib, prison dogs have been used to frighten and to bite prisoners.
Culture of Filth
How did this culture of filth start in America's "war on terror"?
The institutionalized injustice which we have witnessed across the world, the vile American "renditions" in which prisoners are freighted to countries where they can be roasted, electrified or, in Uzbekistan, cooked alive in fat?
As Bob Herbert wrote in The New York Times, what seemed mind-boggling when the first pictures emerged from Abu Ghraib is now routine, typical of the abuse that has "permeated the Bush administration's operations".
A Human Rights Watchdog said April 27, 2005 the abuses at Iraq's Abu Ghraib prison were just the 'tip of the iceberg' of U.S. mistreatment of Muslim prisoners.
An Iraqi detainee gestures toward U.S. soldiers through bars of his cell at Abu Ghraib prison outside Baghdad in this May 17, 2004 photo.
Photo: Damir Sagolj/Reuters
Amnesty, in a chilling 200-page document in October, traced the permeation of Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld's memos into the prisoner interrogation system and the weasel-worded authorization of torture.
In August [2003], for example, only a few months after Bush spoke under the "Mission Accomplished" banner, a Pentagon report stated that "in order to respect the President's inherent constitutional authority to manage a military campaign, [the US law prohibiting torture] must be construed as inapplicable to interrogations undertaken pursuant to his Commander- in-Chief authority."
What does that mean other than permission from Bush to torture?
Cruelty without fear of court action
A 2004 Pentagon report uses words designed to allow interrogators to use cruelty without fear of court actions: "Even if the defendant knows that severe pain will result from his actions, if causing such harm is not his objective, he lacks the requisite specific intent [to be guilty of torture] even though the defendant did not act in good faith."
The man who directly institutionalized cruel sessions of interrogation in Abu Ghraib was Major-General Geoffrey Miller, the Guantánamo commander who flew to Abu Ghraib to "Gitmo-ize the confinement operation" there.
There followed the increased use of painful shackling and the frequent forcible stripping of prisoners.
Maj-Gen Miller's report following his visit in 2003 spoke of the need for a detention guard force at Abu Ghraib that "sets the conditions for the successful interrogation and exploitation of the internees/detainees".
According to Gen Karpinski, Maj-Gen Miller said the prisoners "are like dogs, and if you allow them to believe they're more than a dog, then you've lost control of them".
The trail of prisons that now lies across Iraq is a shameful symbol not only of our cruelty but of our failure to create the circumstances in which a new Iraq might take shape.
You may hold elections and create a government, but when this military sickness is allowed to spread, the whole purpose of democracy is overturned.
The "new" Iraq will learn from these interrogation centers how they should treat prisoners and, inevitably, the "new" Iraqis will take over Abu Ghraib and return it to the status it had under Saddam and the whole purpose of the invasion (or at least the official version) will be lost.
With an insurgency growing ever more vicious and uncontrollable, the emptiness of Mr Bush's silly boast is plain.
The real mission, it seems, was to institutionalize the cruelty of Western armies, staining us forever with the depravity of Abu Ghraib, Guantánamo and Bagram — not to mention the secret prisons which even the Red Cross cannot visit and wherein who knows what vileness is conducted.
What, I wonder, is our next "mission"?
 
You hear the detainee scream out in pain
One of the most...one of the most emotional things that I might say that I saw down there was the conditions and how they deteriorated within the time frame that I was there, the emotional and mental conditions of the prisoners themselves.
I recall seeing, for example, two detainees permanently residing in the detainee hospital who had become so depressed, so despondent, that they no longer had an appetite and stopped eating to the point where they were force-fed with a tube that is inserted through their nose medically into their stomach and force-fed in that manner.
And I witnessed this tube in the hospital being put in the prisoner's nose who didn't want it in his nose, of course.
And it's a very painful experience.
The prisoner had to be shackled down with handcuffs to both sides of the bed.
A guard had to come back and hold the prisoner's head back and then the medic or the nurse would come and put petroleum jelly on the end of the tube, this plastic tube, in his nose so this tube slides down.
As that happens, you hear the detainee scream out in pain.
      Former Guantánamo Chaplain James Yee
 — For God and Country:
Faith and Patriotism Under Fire.
     
U.S. Operatives Killed Detainees During Interrogations in Afghanistan and Iraq — CIA, Navy Seals and Military Intelligence Personnel Implicated.
For Immediate Release   American Civil Liberties Union   OCTOBER 24, 2005
The records reveal the following facts:
A detainee was smothered to death during an interrogation by Military Intelligence on November 26, 2003, in Al Qaim, Iraq.
A previously released autopsy report, that appears to be of General Mowhoush, lists “asphyxia due to smothering and chest compression” as the cause of death and cites bruises from the impact with a blunt object.
New documents specifically record the circumstances of death as “Q by MI, died during interrogation.”

Common Dreams NewsCenter
Published on Saturday, June 18, 2005 by the Independent
We Are All Complicit — But What Can We Do About It?
by Robert Fisk
 
We are all complicit in these vile acts of torture — but what can we do about it?   If our government uses information drained out of these creatures, it is we who are holding the whips.
I still have my notes from a man who knew all about torture, a Druze friend in the 1980s, during the Lebanese war, pleased with himself because he'd just caught two Christian militiamen trying to plant a car bomb on the Beirut seafront.   "I saw two Phalangists over there.   I knew who they were.   They had a bomb in their car.   I called the PSP [Walid Jumblatt's Progressive Socialist Party] and they took them off for questioning."   What happened to them?   "Well, they knew what would happen to them; they knew there was no hope.   They were questioned here for a couple of days and then they were taken up to Beit Eddin."
Ah, Beit Eddin, one of the prettiest villages in Lebanon, the palace of the Emir Bashir the Second, site now of one of the country's finest music festivals — run by Jumblatt's glamorous wife Nora.   But Beit Eddin was different in the 1980s.   "The guys are always told that they are going to die, that there's no point in suffering — because they are going to be killed when they've talked," my Druze friend told me.   "There's a center.   They don't survive.   There are people there who just press them until they talk.   They put things into a man's anus until he screams.   Boiling eggs, that sort of thing.   They kill them in the end.   It's only a few days and it's all over.   I don't really like that sort of thing.   I really don't.   But what can I do?"
It's a good question again now.
What can we do?
What can we do when an American president dispatches "suspects" to third countries where they will be stripped, wired up, electrocuted, ripped open and tortured until they wish they had never been born?
What can we do with a prime minister — ours — who believes that information from torture victims may be of use to us and may be collected by us?
How can we clean our hands when we know that men are being subject to "rendition" through our own airports?
Doesn't a policeman have the right to go aboard these CIA contract jets that touch down in Britain and take a look at the victim inside and — if he believes the man may be tortured — take him off the plane?
Shannon Airport
I started thinking about this more seriously in the beautiful little town of Listowel in Co Kerry — not far, by chance, from Shannon airport — where I went to give a talk at the recent writers' festival.
I was handed a flyer by a bearded man in the audience.
"Who was on board the CIA-chartered plane Reg No N313P that landed in Shannon on 15 December 2003 en route from Iraq?" it asks.
Now, a little fact-checking suggests that the Tralee anti-war group got the details right.
And planes have also gone in the other direction — to Uzbekistan and Egypt and other countries where Geneva Conventions — already disregarded by the lads and lassies in charge of Guantánamo and Abu Ghraib — are used as lavatory paper.
In Uzbekistan, they boil "suspects" in fat.
They take out their nails.
Egypt
In Egypt, they whip prisoners and sometimes sodomize them.
In one Egyptian prison complex a local human rights group found that guards forced prisoners to rape each other.
Irish Government will not investigate
But no friendly Garda walks up to find out who's aboard at Shannon.
The Irish government will not investigate these sinister flights.   Outside, Irish eyes may be smiling.   But they won't be allowed a peek into these revolting aircraft.
It's not difficult to trace our journey to this perdition.
Blair drivel
First, we had Lord Blair of Kut al-Amara, who in November 2003 was ranting away at a joint press conference with George Bush, that "in the face of this terrorism, there must be no holding back, no compromise, no hesitation in confronting this menace".
No holding back?
In tandem with this drivel, we had writers such as David Brooks at the New York Times perniciously asking readers what would happen to "the national mood" when "the news programs start broadcasting images of brutal measures our own troops will (sic) have to adopt... The president will have to remind us that we live in a fallen world, that we have to take morally hazardous action..."
Indeed.
Already there's an infamous case in Canada of a Syrian-born Canadian citizen who was transiting the United States, who was arrested and put on a plane to Damascus where he was duly tortured until the Syrians decided he had nothing to tell them.
Canadian authorities tipped off U.S.
Then he came back to Canada — only to find that the Canadian authorities might have tipped off the US spooks that he was a wanted man.
Now I'm quite an expert on Syrian torture.
A beating is about the best you can expect.
But there exists in one of their "mukhabarat" basements an instrument known as the German chair, installed long ago by the now defunct German Democratic Republic.
The victim is strapped down and the back then moves inwards until the prisoner's spine is snapped.
A home-made version — the Syrian chair — was nastier.
It broke prisoners' backs more slowly.
And as we all know — and Saddam's torture boys were also experts at this — prisoners' families can be brought to prisons to be beaten, raped and sodomized if the inmate still refuses to talk.
With all this are we now complicit.
As long as we send men off to this physical hell, we have the electrodes in our hands; we are the torturers.
As long as our government accepts information drained out of these emasculated creatures, it is we who are pulling out the fingernails; it is we who are holding the whips.
Mind you, our American friends are already, it seems, dab hands at smearing prisoners with excrement and beating them and — given the evidence I've heard from a prisoner who was at Bagram in Afghanistan — sticking brooms up men's anuses, and, of course, just killing them.
Thirty prisoners have now died in US custody.
I don't believe in the few bad apples line.
It's happened on far too great a scale.
And how do we excuse all this filth?
How do we excuse ourselves for this immorality?
Why, we say Saddam was worse than us.
Saddam had women raped; he shot them down into mass graves.
He was much worse.
But if Saddam's wickedness has to be the tuning fork against which all our own iniquities are judged, what does that say about us?
If Saddam's regime is to be the moral compass to define our actions, how bad — how iniquitous — does that allow us to be?
Saddam tortured and executed women in Abu Ghraib.
We only sexually abused prisoners and killed a few of them and murdered some suspects at Bagram and subjected them to inhuman treatment in Guantánamo and sent others off to be boiled and fried and killed off by our "friends" without the embarrassment of being present.
Saddam was much worse.
And thus it became inevitable that the symbol of Saddam's shame — Abu Ghraib — subsequently became the symbol of our shame too.
Common Dreams © 1997-2005
Juan Gonzalez:  ...You mentioned the monitors in the back.   And that was because you had this special prison block for prisoners who were mentally disturbed, who had been seriously affected by the conditions that they were living in.
Chaplain James Yee:   They had to be monitored 24 hours a day, because they were under suicide threat.
It was that serious.
It was so serious that the Joint Task Force needed to have a team of 17 psychiatric nurses and doctors to take care of these prisoners who got to that state.
And this resulted [mass suicide attempts] when I was there predominantly from their complaints that the Koran was being abused, or that Islam was being insulted, disrespected.
Other general complaints that they had, for the most part, I was able to try and handle them and try and relieve some of those tensions.
So, the protests, the resistance was the abuse of the Koran.
They could put up with being mistreated to some extent.
They can put up with being humiliated.
But what they wouldn't put up with is Islam or the Koran being mistreated, and that led to them taking drastic measures, conducting the — willing to conduct or take their own life and try and hang themselves.
Now, contrast that with today.
There's a growing hunger strike going on now in Guantánamo.
And we see that in the news where not just two detainees are being force-fed, but it's been reported that some 18 or 21 detainees are now being force-fed.
And we have seen in the news, the recent news reports, the reasons for this protest, it's not just now abuses against religion, it's the general abuses that I was able to handle and help them deal with when I was there.
There's no Muslim chaplain there today, as far as I know.
So this, to me, is an indication that the conditions down in Guantánamo seemingly have deteriorated to even worse conditions than when I was there almost two years ago.”
Force feeding is in itself torture — Doctors and all military and government paid personnel involved are complicit in such torture and must be prosecuted for war crimes.
Force feeding is in itself torture — Doctors and all military and government paid personnel involved are complicit in such torture and must be prosecuted for war crimes.
Friday, 7 October 2005
Guantánamo food strike 'serious'
Detainees at Guantanamo Bay in 2001

The Guantanamo detainees have not been charged
The Guantánamo detainees have not been charged
The situation at Guantánamo Bay — where dozens of detainees are on hunger strike — is serious, the International Committee of the Red Cross has warned.
Last month, ICRC officials visited the US camp, where some 500 alleged Taleban and al-Qaeda fighters are being held.
But spokeswoman Antonella Notari said she could not comment on details of what they had witnessed there.
Inmates' lawyers say some 200 men have taken part in the fast which began in August. About 20 are being force-fed.
The US authorities say that only 28 detainees remain on hunger strike, of whom 22 are being fed through tubes at the prison hospital.
A spokesman at the US base in Cuba, Lieutenant Colonel Jeremy Martin, said the men were being closely monitored and were in stable condition.
Clive Stafford Smith, a lawyer for 40 of the detainees, said some of them had been shackled to their beds to stop them removing the feeding tubes.
The ICRC backs a 1975 declaration that states that doctors should not take part in force-feeding.
'Rolling strike'
On Thursday, human rights groups called on the UK government to intervene to resolve the hunger strike.
Amnesty International disputes US figures and says that 210 detainees are currently refusing food, protesting against their detention without trial or charges.
The Pentagon has described the inmates' action as a rolling hunger strike, with groups of them taking turns to refuse food.
Many of the detainees have been held at the camp since it was set up in 2002, after the US-led offensive against the Taleban regime in Afghanistan.
       Torture by US doctors, medics, psychologists and military personnel         
U.S. Operatives Killed Detainees During Interrogations in Afghanistan and Iraq — CIA, Navy Seals and Military Intelligence Personnel Implicated.
For Immediate Release   American Civil Liberties Union   OCTOBER 24, 2005
The records reveal the following facts:
A detainee at Abu Ghraib Prison, captured by Navy Seal Team number seven, died on November 4, 2003, during an interrogation by Navy Seals and “OGA.”
A previously released autopsy report, that appears to be of Manadel Al Jamadi, shows that the cause of his death was “blunt force injury complicated by compromised respiration.”
New documents specifically record the circumstances of death as “Q by OGA and NSWT died during interrogation.”




U.S. Operatives Killed Detainees During Interrogations in Afghanistan and Iraq — CIA, Navy Seals and Military Intelligence Personnel Implicated.
For Immediate Release   American Civil Liberties Union   OCTOBER 24, 2005
The records reveal the following facts:
An Afghan civilian died from “multiple blunt force injuries to head, torso and extremities” on November 6, 2003, at a Forward Operating Base in Helmand Province, Afghanistan.

(Facts in the autopsy report appear to match the previously reported case of Abdul Wahid.)
Allow me to torture
Everyone is disturbed about this barbaric and illegal practice except the Bush administration.
In an amendment to a $440 billion defense budget bill last Wednesday, the US Senate voted 90 to 9 to ban "cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment" of anyone in US government custody.
President Bush responded to the Senate's will by repeating his earlier threat to veto the bill.
Allow me to torture, demands Bush of the Senate, or you will be guilty of delaying the military's budget during wartime.
Bush is threatening the Senate with blame for the deaths of US soldiers who will die because they don't get their body armor or humvee armor in time.
U.S. Operatives Killed Detainees During Interrogations in Afghanistan and Iraq — CIA, Navy Seals and Military Intelligence Personnel Implicated.
For Immediate Release   American Civil Liberties Union   OCTOBER 24, 2005
The records reveal the following facts:
A 52-year-old male Iraqi was strangled to death at the Whitehorse detainment facility on June 6, 2003, in Nasiriyah, Iraq.
His autopsy also revealed bone and rib fractures, and multiple bruises on his body.
(Facts in the autopsy report appear to match the previously reported case of Nagm Sadoon Hatab.)
Torture
http://CorpWatch.org   December 13, 2004
...As the struggle in Iraq intensifies, its bitter and revealing ironies rise like angry waves, pummeling the eroding promontory of the war's many myths — foremost among them its very viability.
Iraqis resisting occupation, soldiers exposing the brutalities that are fueling anti-occupation sentiment, and other Americans reluctantly being pressed into service to strengthen that occupation, are, in uneven, overlapping and contradictory ways, all victims of this war.
Consider the case of the case of Sergeant Frank Ford, a counterintelligence agent in the National Guard's 223rd Military Intelligence division with 30 years of military service.
He was witness to five incidents of torture and abuse of Iraqis in Samarra before he decided he could no longer stand by and do nothing.
US Army counterintelligence agent David Debatto, who spoke with Ford, related his story thusly:
"He described multiple incidents of what he called 'war crimes' and 'torture' of Iraqi detainees in age from about 15 to 35.
According to Ford, his teammates, three counterintelligence agents like himself — one of them a woman — systematically and repeatedly abused several Iraqi male detainees over a two to three week time period.
Ford describes incidents of asphyxiation, mock executions, arms being pulled out of sockets, and lit cigarettes forced into detainee's ears while they were blindfolded and bound."
Ford, his anger apparent, also noted:
"I guess one of the things that pisses me off most is the arrogance.
Some of the medics, too.
Saying things like 'So what, he's just another haji,' like they were scum or some kind of animal, really just pisses me off."
So what happened when Ford brought the brutalities to the attention of his superior officer in June 2003?
Strapped down to a gurney
His immediate superior was himself involved in the abuse, and the one above him, when told of the allegations of war crimes by Ford, simply said chillingly:
"Nope, that never happened.
You're delusional, you imagined the whole thing.
And you've got 30 seconds to withdraw your complaint.
If you do it, it will be as if this conversation never took place."
What happened next topped even this surreal Orwellian encounter:
"[Ford was ordered] to report immediately to Captain Angela Madera, an Army psychiatrist, at the base mental-health facility for a 'combat stress evaluation.'"
When Madera evaluated Ford as having no mental health issues, the superior officer, according to another witness, was "just livid," and berated and intimidated Madera into altering the report.
Ultimately, Ford was strapped down to a gurney and literally shipped out of Iraq illegally on the basis of non-existent mental problems — all because he had the courage to speak out against abuses he personally witnessed.
His case is not unique:  a military doctor charged with examining Ford in Germany (and who cleared him of any illness) noted "that he had treated 'three of four' other US soldiers from Iraq that were also sent to Landstuhl for psychological evaluationsafter they reported incidents."
Another soldier who reported abuse, Julian Goodrum was "allegedly locked in a psychiatric ward as punishment for filing a complaint over the death of a soldier under his command."
He had also appeared before Congress to air grievances about the poor quality of medical care Reserve soldiers received.
In another known case, Sergeant Samuel Provance of the 205th Military Intelligence Brigade lost his security clearance and was shipped off to Germany after reporting abuses at Abu Ghraib.  (1)
That Iraqis and other Arabs are being illegally abused, tortured, and killed on a systematic basis ­ and that the top levels of command are assiduously covering it up — is not in any doubt.
Grabbed detainee's thumbs and bent them backward
A leaked letter from July 2004 sent by a senior Justice Department official to the Army's leading criminal investigator reveals that FBI agents witnessed acts of torture and abuse committed against detainees at Guantánamo Bay in 2002, and reported them to the Pentagon ­ which proceeded to do nothing.
"Harrington [the FBI counterterrorism expert who wrote the letter] said FBI officials complained about the pattern of abusive techniques to top Defense Department attorneys in January 2003, and it appeared that nothing was done."
One of the incidents witnessed by an FBI agent was as follows:  "Sergeant Lacey [a female] whispered in the ear of a handcuffed and shackled detainee, caressed him and applied lotion to his arms."
This occurred during Ramadan ­ when sexual activity is forbidden for Muslims.
But this was not about sex:  "Later, the detainee appeared to grimace in pain, and the FBI agent asked a Marine who was present why.
The Marine said [Lacey] had grabbed the detainee's thumbs and bent them backward and also indicated that she also grabbed his genitals."
The Marine also "implied that her treatment of that detainee was less harsh than her treatment of others by indicating that he had seen her treatment of other detainees result in detainees curling into a fetal position on the floor and crying in pain."  (2)
It does not take much imagination to understand what was happening:  Arab prisoners at Guantamo were having their testicles crushed by female military personnel.
There was, of course, no admission that any change had taken place.
Merely it became known, with extreme suddenness and everywhere at once, that Eastasia and not Eurasia was the enemy.
George Orwell 1984
Trying to find terrorists
BAGHDAD — The public war on the Iraqi insurgency has led to an atmosphere of hidden brutalities, including abuse and torture, carried out against detainees by the nation's special security forces, according to defense lawyers, international organizations and Iraq's Ministry of Human Rights.
Up to 60% of the estimated 12,000 detainees in the country's prisons and military compounds face intimidation, beatings or torture that leads to broken bones and sometimes death, said Saad Sultan, head of a board overseeing the treatment of prisoners at the Human Rights Ministry.
He added that police and security forces attached to the Interior Ministry are responsible for most abuses.
The units have used tactics reminiscent of Saddam Hussein's secret intelligence squads, according to the ministry and independent human rights groups and lawyers, who have cataloged abuses.
"We've documented a lot of torture cases," said Sultan, whose committee is pushing for wider access to Iraqi-run prisons across the nation.
Torture — Most worked during Saddam's regime.
"There are beatings, punching, electric shocks to the body, including sensitive areas, hanging prisoners upside down and beating them and dragging them on the ground….  Many police officers come from a culture of torture from their experiences over the last 35 years.  Most of them worked during Saddam's regime."
The ordeal described by Hussam Guheithi is similar to many cases.
When Iraqi national guardsmen raided his home last month, the 35-year-old Sunni Muslim imam said they lashed him with cables, broke his nose and promised to soak their uniforms with his blood.
He was blindfolded and driven to a military base, where he was interrogated and beaten until the soldiers were satisfied that he wasn't an extremist.
At the end of nine days, Guheithi said, the guardsmen told him, "You have to bear with us.  You know the situation now.  We're trying to find terrorists."
Tom Tomorrow    June 26, 2005          http://www.thismodernworld.com/      
       Chain of Command:   The Road from 9/11       
       to Abu Ghraib         
Confiscated evidence of abuse and intimidated debriefers when they complained
Another classified report written around the same time recently (partially) released indicates similar horrors were imported into Iraq:
"One of Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld's closest advisers learned of allegations that a clandestine military task force in Iraq was beating detainees, ordering Defense Intelligence Agency debriefers out of the room during questioning, confiscating evidence of the abuse and intimidating the debriefers when they complained."
The director of the DIA is the highest official in the administration known to complain of abuse, though the Bush administration "fought vigorously to keep the new documents from public view."
The two-page memo explains that a group named "Task Force 121" (now Task Force 6-26) hid "ghost detainees" in secret facilities and beat them up, including, as DIA agents noted, "punch[ing] a prisoner in the face to the point the individual needed medical attention," and leaving burn and bruise marks all over detainees. (3)
Outside America's new gulags, Iraqis still face the wrath of Bush's freedom campaign.
According to military prosecutors and several soldiers, in an August 28 raid in Sadr City, two "American soldiers shot to death two unarmed Iraqi men in their homes, then tried to cover up their crimes by claiming that the Iraqis had reached for guns."
Soldiers from the 41st Infantry Regiment, 1st Battallion who participated in the raid in which the civilian Iraqis were killed "said they immediately suspected that their two colleagues had murdered the Iraqi."
This followed another killing.
"The second killing occurred less than 30 minuters earlier, soldiers testified, when troops discovered an AK-47 rifle during a search of another house down the street.
Williams ordered that the Iraqi man, who had been handcuffed and was being held on his knees in front of the house, be brought inside.
William cut off the plastic handcuffs, laid the rifle near the Iraqi and said aloud to other soldiers in the room, 'I feel my life has been threatened.'
Williams then shot the man twice"
One of the testifying soldiers, Private first class Gary Romriell, who had to switch units after complaining about the murders said:
"It was a real moral dilemma.
On the one hand, my friends and associates were involved in the crimes.
On the other hand, it was wrong."
Romriell rejected the perverse right-wing notion that the any act is moral so long as "our side" commits it.
He rejected the logic of "my country, right or wrong" — as a citizen serving his country, he did what was right, and called out those citizens of his country who were wrong.  (4)
Train to kill, kill we will
Other soldiers have gone further.
Former US Marine Sergeant Jimmy Massey "said his unit killed more than 30 innocent Iraqi civilians" in testimony before a Canadian tribunal, which is deciding whether it will allow deserting paratrooper Jeremy Hinzman, formerly of the 82nd Airborne, to seek asylum in that country ­ and therefore avoid prosecution in the US. 
In support of Hinzman, Massey told the court, "I do know that we killed innocent civilians," adding:
"I was never clear on who was the enemy and who was not.
When you don't know who the enemy is, what are you doing there?"   (5)
Hinzman himself has said he began having doubts about the military when:
"I was walking to chow hall with my unit, and we were yelling, 'Train to kill, kill we will,' over and over again.
I kind of snuck a peek around me and saw all my colleagues getting the red in the face and hoarse yelling — and at that point a light went off in my head and said, 'You know, I made the wrong career decision.'"  (6)
Hinzman is one of over 5,500 servicemen who have deserted the armed forces since the war in Iraq began.
Many of these soldiers left the military not because they are cowards, but because they discovered that war was based on lies.
Private first class Dan Felushko, 24, for instance, remarked, "I didn't want, you know, 'Died deluded in Iraq' over my gravestone," noting that he — along with every intelligence community around the world — saw no connection between September 11th and Hussein.
One youngster from Texas who signed up for the Army two months before the war started said that at first, "I was supportive.   I didn't think to question."
But then, he did:
"I found out, basically, that they found no weapons of mass destruction and the claim that they made about ties to al Qaeda was coming up short, to say the least.
It made me angry, because I felt our lives were being thrown away as soldiers.
My image of my country always being the good guy, and always fighting for just causes, has been shattered"  (7)
Only a handful of the deserters have actually fled to Canada.
But those who desert during wartime and remain within the US military's reach are usually thrown in jail for years.
The full penalty under the law is execution.
When the war machine is not forcing Americans into morally compromising situations, transforming some into killers; when it is not actively intimidating and attacking those brave enough to speak out against atrocities; when it is not trying to hunt down and jail those who reject an illegal war, it still ensnares, grinds up, and spits out perfectly "patriotic" military personnel — and even Americans who aren't supposed to be part of the military anymore.
Official casualty statistics show that more than 1,230 American soldiers have died and more than 9,300 have been wounded in action.
But this is misleading.
A Pentagon letter recently disclosed that more than 15,000 troops with "non-battle" injuries and diseases have been evacuated from Iraq.
These include injuries arising from "accidents," as well as emotional and psychological trauma.
According to a CBS report, only 20% of these 15,000 troops return to their units.  (8)
Required limb amputations at twice the rate of past wars
Also misleading are the official non-fatality casualties:  over half of them are serious enough to prevent a return to the war theater.
Because more troops are being spared death from improved body and battle armor, more of those who survive suffer from severely crippling injuries.
US troops injured in Iraq "have required limb amputations at twice the rate of past wars, and as many as 20 percent have suffered head and neck injuries that may require a lifetime of care."
A majority of casualties come not from bullet fire but IEDs, which retired US Army Surgeon G. Holt explained, are particularly vicious because, "The angle of the force of these IEDs is right for the neck and face."  (9)
What becomes of those military veterans who undergo amputation?
The case of Army specialist Robert Loria is instructive.
His arm ripped off by an IED while in Baqubah, Loria spent several months recuperating at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington D.C., before being sent back to his base in Fort Hood, Texas. 
There, he was expecting to leave the Army with $4,486 in pay.
But instead he received something else:  an Army bill totaling $6,255.50 for medical care, an "erroneous" previous payment, and items in his possession that were blown up in the attack.
Now he is $1,768.81 in debt and doesn't even have enough money to return home.
His wife was outraged:  "They want us to sacrifice more.  His being blown up was supposed to be the worst thing, but it wasn't.  That the military doesn't care was the worst."  (10)
While the Army is busy booting out some of its discarded material, it is equally busy trying to recycle others.
It has called up 5,000 Americans from the Ready Reserve for two years of service, who "generally don't train or get paid or belong to units, but can be called up in case of war or national emergency." 
The vast majority of them never dreamed they would be called up for duty:  they served years ago and are tied to the military through an obscure clause relegated to the "remark section" of their contracts — and represented only in the form a six-digit reference to the actual clause itself — that requires them to resign their commissions to fully exit the service.
They'll have to drag me away and make me go.
Therefore people like Carey Trevino, a 31 year-old woman with three kids, including a baby boy, and Margaret Murray, a 4 foot 8 inch 55 year-old woman, and Rick Howell, a 47 year-old who is disabled at the knee from an injury suffered during his military career, are all being thrown onto the front lines.
Howell, who said he would serve if he was restricted to carrying out duties in the United States and was refused that request, now says:
"They're going to have to come and get me.
I mean literally.
They'll have to drag me away and make me go."  (11)
The military's resort to desperate and draconian measures should come as no surprise.
Its forces in Iraq are overstretched, overextended, and unable to cope with battlefield requirements, a fact most military experts freely admit.
A full 43% of the 138,000 troops deployed in Iraq ­ soon to be boosted to 150,000 — are part-timers.
Many are trapped there under "stop-loss" orders extending their stay; one of the eight soldiers who recently sued the military for this tactic lost his court battle to prevent the Army from turning his one-year contract into a two-year (at least) ordeal.
Still, soldiers are resisting lucrative bonuses designed to entice them into staying in the service.
In fact, a recent army survey revealed that half the existing force was not planning to re-enlist at all.   (12)
No serious person can doubt, therefore, that a continuation of the war at this level will require full-blown military conscription.
This war is a multi-layered disaster for an ever-expanding swath of Iraqis and Americans.
The fundamental contradiction of war is that it can be based on lies, but it cannot be fought by liars.
If people were willing to fight for lies, then they would not have to be lied to in the first place.
Those American soldiers in the battlefield, like all Americans at home, were subjected to an intense propaganda barrage about the motives, aims, and goals of the war.
They were deceived.
But today, those soldiers are facing a barrage of an altogether different sort: that of an Iraqi insurgency whose very existence, success, and growth explodes all the official war claims.
Government believes it can lie without consequence
The government believes that it can lie without consequence because, as one administration minion put it, such matters only concern "the reality-based community."  It must be conceded that is true.
But it must also be conceded that those soldiers witnessing their friends and comrades dying and suffering around them, those troops aware of the horrific atrocities taking place, those families seeing their loved ones sent off without warning and return home without limbs, are leading members of "the reality-based community."
It is the duty of American anti-war activists to reach out to these people — as we have already begun to do — and end the war that is destroying America's soul.
M. Junaid Alam, 21, in 1966, was at that time the co-editor of the radical youth journal Left Hook
Last checked by TheWE.biz, LeftHook.org no longer publishes an internet website
)
Notes
1. "Whitewashing torture?" David DeBatto, Salon.com, December 8, 2004.
2. "FBI witnessed Guantánamo 'abuse'." The Associated Press, December 7, 2004.
3. "Report to Defense Alleged Abuse By Prison Interrogation Teams." Barton Gellman and R. Jeffrey Smith, Washington Post. December 8, 2004.
4. "U.S. Military Prosecutors Allege Murder, Cover-Up." By Edmund Sanders, LA Times, December 6, 2004.
5. "U.S. Marine claims unit killed Iraqi civilians." ABC News, December 8, 2004.
6. "Deserters: We Won't Go To Iraq." CBS News, December 8, 2004.
7. See note 6.
8. "Press Routinely Undercounts U.S. Casualties in Iraq." E &P Staff, November 25, 2004.
9. "Amputation rate for US troops twice that of past wars." By Raja Mishra, Boston Globe, December 9, 2004.
10. "He lost an arm in Iraq; the Army wants money." By Dianna Cahn, Times Herald-Record, December 10, 2004.
11. "Old Soldiers Back on Duty." CBS News. December 5, 2004.
12. "U.S. Army Plagued by Desertion and Plunging Morale." By Elaine Monaghan, the Times U.K., December 10, 2004.
Torture
CBS June 25, 2004
Three U.S. soldiers will testify that a former CIA contractor beat an Afghan detainee with a heavy flashlight 10 to 30 times and kicked the man so hard he came off the ground and later begged to be shot, a prosecutor said Friday.
Assistant U.S. Attorney Jim Candelmo described the alleged assault in arguing that the contractor, David Passaro, should be detained until his trial.   He is the first American to face civilian charges over prisoner abuse in either Iraq or Afghanistan.
The prosecutor said 82nd Airborne soldiers will testify that during one interrogation session, Passaro left the room and Wali begged one of the paratroopers guarding him "to please shoot me before the defendant returned."
Candelmo argued that Passaro is dangerous and poses a flight risk, with aliases, hidden assets and extensive training in covert military operations.
The former Army special operations soldier was working as a CIA contractor while on leave from a civilian job with the Fort Bragg-headquartered Special Operations Command.
Defense lawyers have cited an Afghan governor's comment that Wali died of a heart attack, but a spokesman for that governor recently said he suspected heart problems only because U.S. officials insisted the man was not mistreated.
U.S. officials say an autopsy was not conducted to find the cause of death.
Separately, the lawyer for a soldier accused in the Abu Ghraib prisoner abuse scandal said Friday the military might be incapable of handling the case because key players will not step forward for fear of incriminating themselves.
The comments by the lawyer of Spc. Sabrina Harman came a day after her company commander testified that the head of military intelligence at Abu Ghraib was present the night a plan was hatched to cover up the death of a detainee, apparently during questioning in November.
Harman, 26, of Lorton, Va., faces possible court-martial for her alleged involvement in abusing Iraqi detainees at the facility outside Baghdad.
She appeared Friday for the second day of an Article 32 hearing, the military equivalent of a grand jury hearing, called to determine whether facts in the case are sufficient to warrant a court-martial or other action.
Harman's attorney, Frank Spinner, told a pool reporter after the hearing that he "has no doubt that Iraqi detainees have been physically abused on a wide scale" that would be "beyond the military's ability ever to prosecute."
"The chain of command — they know it, too — and the problem is that people won't step up and admit it," Spinner said.   "To do it now would only subject them to prosecution."
On Thursday, Harman's company commander, Capt. Donald J. Reese, testified that he was asked to go to a shower room at the prison one night in November and found a group of intelligence personnel standing around the corpse of a bloodied detainee.
Col. Thomas M. Pappas, Abu Ghraib's commander of military intelligence, was among those who were there, discussing what to do with the body, Reese said.
"I'm not going down for this alone," Pappas said, according to Reese.
No medics were called.
Reese told the court that an Army colonel named "Jordan" sent a soldier to the mess hall for ice to preserve the body overnight.
An autopsy of the detainee the following day determined he died of a blood clot resulting from a blow to the head, Reese said.
The testimony did not further identify the colonel.
However, the Taguba report on prison abuse at Abu Ghraib notes that Lt. Col. Steven L. Jordan was the head of the interrogation center at the prison.
Reese said in his testimony that military intelligence clearly controlled the cellblock where Harman's platoon worked the night shift with other members of her platoon.
An Army report obtained by The New Yorker magazine quotes Harman as saying her job was to keep detainees awake.
"My MPs, they were directed by the (military intelligence) people for what they wanted and how they wanted it," he said.
Harman is one of six soldiers still facing charges in the scandal that emerged in April when photographs depicting the abuse appeared on CBS News' 60 Minutes II.
Pappas, Jordan and Reese do not face criminal charges at present.
No soldier with a rank above staff sergeant has been charged, although the Denver Post reported this week that two chief warrant officers will soon be charged.
However, all three officers were singled out for criticism in the Taguba report.
Taguba recommended each man be reprimanded for offenses like "failing to ensure that Soldiers under his direct command knew and understood the protections afforded to detainees in the Geneva Convention Relative to the Treatment of Prisoners of War."
Also Friday, the Army replaced Maj. Gen. George Fay with a more senior general as chief investigator of military intelligence practices at the Abu Ghraib prison.
The new lead investigator is Lt. Gen. Anthony R. Jones, deputy commander of the Army Training and Doctrine Command.
Army officials said the decision to put Jones in charge was not a reflection on Fay's performance but an effort to resolve a protocol issue in the investigation.
At issue was the need to interview Lt. Gen. Ricardo Sanchez as part of the investigation.
Sanchez is the top American commander in Iraq, and the Army wanted a lead investigator who was at least equal in rank to the three-star Sanchez.
Fay is a two-star.
Jones technically is senior to Sanchez because he has held his three-star rank slightly longer.
Guantánamo detainees released.
The 115-page report is testimony by the three young men from Tipton, a poor neighborhood in the West Midlands of England with a small community of Pakistani and Bangladeshi people.
All three were detained in Northern Afghanistan on November 28, 2001.
In March of 2004, after 2 ½ years in extreme conditions, they were released to the U.K.
They were never charged with any crime and were released shortly after they returned.
The men completed this report solely to let the world know the truth about what is happening to the prisoners at Guantánamo and in the hope that their testimony might help improve conditions for those still there.
The document was compiled by the Tipton men and their attorney, noted British civil rights lawyer Gareth Peirce.
The report details the several weeks that Rasul and Iqbal were held in open cages at Camp X-Ray, allowed out for only a few minutes each week for one shower, and otherwise left to swelter in the Cuban heat.
Scorpions and snakes were allowed to roam the cells, and many prisoners were bitten.
According the report, the US marines who ran the camp were “very brutal,” and the abusive treatment was focused in a carefully planned and sophisticated manner to have maximum impact on the individual prisoner:

• The report discusses the sexual humiliation of the prisoners that first began when General Geoffrey Miller, later of Abu Ghraib notoriety, came to Guantánamo.
For example, the prisoners would be stripped naked and forced to watch videotapes of other prisoners who, in turn, had been ordered to sodomize each other.
The sexual humiliation was reserved for those who would be most impacted by it, those who had been brought up strictly in their Muslim faith.
• The religious humiliation was similarly focused.
The guards would throw the prisoners’ Korans into the toilet.
They would forcibly shave the prisoners.
There was a clear policy to try to force people to abandon their religious faith.
• The prisoners would be forcibly injected with unidentified drugs as part of the interrogation process.
They were told they could only get medical care if they cooperated.
• Some among the British detainees — Moazzam Begg and Feroz Abbasi — have been held in total isolation for well over a year.
Link to download 115 page report by Shafiq Rasul, Asif Iqbal and Rhuhel Ahmed — Tipton Three

Graphic first-hand account of life at Guantánamo Bay.
      Abu Ghraib soldier, Concientious Objector
Aidan Delgado      
www.timesleader.com October 22, 2004 BRIAN WITTE Associated Press
Wife of soldier sentenced in prison abuse scandal speaks out
BALTIMORE The wife of an Army reservist sentenced to prison for abusing prisoners in Iraq said she knows her husband was wrong, but she also blames higher-ranking officials who "sit behind the curtains" for the abuse.
Martha Frederick, wife of Staff Sgt. Ivan "Chip" Frederick, said the eight-year sentence he received Thursday for his role in the Abu Ghraib prison scandal will force her family to "endure hardships and many sacrifices."
"The pain sets deeper yet in knowing that he serves these years not only for his actions or actions of a few reservists, but those included in the chain of command," she wrote in an e-mail to The Associated Press.
Her 38-year-old husband, of Buckingham, Va., received the stiffest punishment given so far in the scandal.
But she questioned why her husband's superiors weren't being punished for what she said was their complicity on the abuse.
"I feel outrage that he and a few others will bear the weight for the actions of many," she wrote.
Since finding out her husband faced charges, Frederick wrote that her family has felt as if they were "facing a life-threatening situation when you relive your life's most memorable moments as well as contemplating all the things that you wish you could change or have done differently."
Martha Frederick said she will always see her husband as a "good soldier."
"I will see my husband as a far greater man than those who have abandoned him, left him to be convicted for his acts and the failures of their own," she wrote.
Throughout the e-mail, she claims "misguided" leadership led to the abuse of Iraqi detainees.
She wrote that the photographs and videos showing abuse "do not represent the people of this country, nor do they represent Chip as a person."
"I do not see Chip as a good soldier gone bad but as a good soldier thrust into a no-win situation," she wrote.
She writes of the pain and isolation her family has felt, especially her husband, who was sentenced in Iraq, far from his family.
"It is not just how my husband will endure incarceration but how he will endure being left behind, used and discarded," she wrote.
Frederick joined the Army National Guard at 17, after convincing his mother to sign the papers authorizing his enlistment.
Seven members of the 372nd Military Police Company of Cresaptown, Md., have been charged in the scandal.
Spc. Jeremy C. Sivits of Hyndman, Pa., is already serving a one-year sentence after pleading guilty in May to three counts.
Torture
July 2, 2003
Torture seems to be rearing its head again in the western two ‘allied’ nations.
The European court in 1982 found that the United Kingdom violated human rights law in the techniques they used upon the Irish terroists.
The country agreed to halt such procedures.
       Human Rights Lawyer of the Year       
       Phil Shiner report to World Tribunal       
       War Crimes — Illegality of Preventive Attack       
       Unilateral Use of Force       
A British spokesman Lt. Col. Peregrine Lewis, denied the coalition violates human rights.
He states in an e-mail sent to the Associated Press:
“Coalition soldiers are expected to scrupulously adhere to the rule of law in the conduct of military operations.
Anything which suggests otherwise is inaccurate.”
Photographs taken and given to a photo-developing shop by a UK soldier when he returned home had enough horror pictures of Iraq males being forced naked upon the floor, being forced to commit oral sexual acts, being bent over to receive anal sexual penetration, that the young woman clerk in the store called the police.
It was in the news for a few days, then became lost in the many other ‘simulations’ taking place.
The photos were accepted as being accurate depictions, although comments were made in the press that the men shown were forced to pose, not forced into sexual activity.
Does one act make it right for any person to perpetuate acts of torture upon another, never mind what the original act might have been?
The people of the United Kingdom have outlawed the extinction of human life.
Their parliament has in the past few days voted to end the tearing apart of foxes by packs of dogs, deeming it not worthy of a civilized society.
The U.S. military while stating it does not commit acts of torture said it could not comment on its methods of interrogation.
Soldiers adhere to the rule of law, it states.
Sleep deprivation, shackling prisoners in uncomfortable positions and noise abuse are considered legal methods of extracting information, even from those who have nothing to give, even from those caught up in the circus of events.
Khraisan al-Abally, one person who claimed he was tortured, said U.S. troops stormed his home April 30, shooting his brother and taking al-Abally and his 80-year-old father into custody — believing they had information on the whereabouts of a top official in Saddam Hussein’s regime, Izzat Ibrahim al-Douri.
Khraisan al-Abally has told reporters that he was forced to kneel naked and was kept bound hand and foot with a bag over his head for eight days.
The reporters noted the man’s wrists were scarred from plastic cuffs.
“I thought I was going to lose my mind.
They said, ‘I want you on your knees.’
After three or four days it’s very painful.
My knees were bleeding and swollen.”
The United States has suspended military aid to countries who will not give Americans immunity from prosecution by the new International Criminal Court in The Hague.
The US signed the 1998 treaty creating the court, but US President Bush has rescinded the signature.
The court was set up last year to try people for war crimes and acts of genocide.
(note:   Not that I am not in favor of suspending military aid, for any reason.)
Do we, as civilized people wish to allow actions of torture to take place in our name?
Even if the people we torture are those who have fought the soldiers who invaded their land?
Even if the people are still fighting?
Is this what we as a ruling generation wish to have as our legacy?
That we allow sadists, both sexual and otherwise, free reign to practise their art.
That we condone it.
For who would even contemplate committing such acts.
Would you?
Would you watch someone as you passed, someone on his knees naked with a bag over his head, bound hand and foot, his knees bleeding?
What would you think?
Would you get cold?
Get a deadening sense of life becoming non-life?
Would that tell you that what was happening was not from good?
That it was from evil?
posted by kewe    10:46 P.M.
       UK soldiers charged with abuse,       
       including forcing naked upon the floor,       
       being forced to simulate oral sexual acts,       
       and to receive anal sexual penetration.       
       Human Rights Lawyer of the Year       
       Phil Shiner report to World Tribunal       
       War Crimes — Illegality of Preventive Attack       
       Unilateral Use of Force       
The New Yorker:   Seymour Hersh
Rumsfeld approved "a highly secret operation" last year, which "encouraged physical coercion and the sexual humiliation of Iraqi prisoners in an effort to generate more intelligence about the growing insurgency in Iraq."
Rules were:   'Grab whom you must.    Do what you want'
CNN May 17, 2004: "This is the most hysterical piece of journalist malpractice I have ever observed," said Rumsfeld spokesman Lawrence DiRita.
Hersh, in an interview Monday on CNN's "American Morning," said there was no reason to believe Rumsfeld or President Bush knew about the abuses of Abu Ghraib inmates captured in photographs that have sparked outrage across the world.
"But the way it began was with" the clandestine program, he said.
Referring to criticism of the article, Hersh told CNN he has faced similar attacks before when uncovering major stories: "I understand this is going to be the kind of response."
"I leaned over backwards to make sure in my own reporting, he continued.    "I met multiple sources.    There was a lot of basis for this.    It will come out eventually."
Martin Sieff
UPI Senior News Analyst
Army, CIA want torture truths exposed
Published 5/18/2004
These [Hersh] allegations of course are anathema to the White House, Rumsfeld and their media allies.
In a highly unusual step for any newspaper, the editorially neo-conservative tabloid New York Post ran an editorial Monday seeking to ridicule and discredit Hersh.
However, it presented absolutely no evidence to query, let alone discredit the substance of his article and allegations.
Instead, the New York Post editorial inadvertently pointed out one, but by no means all, of the major sources for Hersh's information.
The editorial alleged that Hersh had received much of his material from the CIA.
Based on the material Hersh quoted, his legendary intelligence community contacts were probably sources for some of his information.
However, Hersh has also enjoyed close personal relations with many now high-ranking officers in the United States Army, going all the way back to his prize-winning coverage and scoops in Vietnam more than 30 years ago.
Kewe: April 8 2004
U.S. military officials told NBC News that there were unreleased images showing U.S. soldiers severely beating an Iraqi prisoner nearly to death, having sex with an Iraqi female prisoner and “acting inappropriately with a dead body.”
The officials said there was also a videotape, apparently shot by U.S. personnel, showing Iraqi guards raping young boys.
UK Soldier C told the Mirror that suspects had "10 kids of crap" beaten out of them and said officers only stepped in when the appalling beatings got too heavy.
...He went up to one of the prisoners who still had a sandbag on his face and was poking his fingers into his eyeballs until the guy was screaming in pain.
Kewe note May 9,2004:
The following all reads so much of the Nazis.
As the horror begins to become absorbed, words are failing.
And there is the recognition by the Americans of what they are doing.
That they are still interrogating.
That they still believe, God — only God knows that they have some reason, some validation to continue with this war.
Where have we sunk in our opinion of basic human rights, and human dignity?
I am so sorry for what has happened to the two Western nations.
http://www.newyorker.com/
In “Chain of Command,” in the May 17, 2004, issue of The New Yorker, Seymour M. Hersh describes new photos he has obtained of a dog attacking a naked Iraqi detainee at Abu Ghraib prison on December 12, 2003.
The photos, which had been in the possession of a member of the 320th Military Police Battalion, show the Iraqi with his hands clasped behind his back, “leaning against the door to a cell, contorted with terror, as the dogs bark a few feet away,” Hersh reports.
In another photo, taken a few minutes later, “the Iraqi is lying on the ground, writhing in pain, with a soldier sitting on top of him, knee pressed to his back.
Blood is streaming from the inmate’s leg.”
UK Soldier C told the Mirror that suspects had "10 kids of crap" beaten out of them and said officers only stepped in when the appalling beatings got too heavy.
...He went up to one of the prisoners who still had a sandbag on his face and was poking his fingers into his eyeballs until the guy was screaming in pain
Naked prisoner covered in excrement is paraded down a corridor

Photo: Washington Post
A naked prisoner covered in excrement is paraded down a corridor.
The Washington Post report describes a video clip which shows an inmate shackled to a door.
He repeatedly slams his head into the metal, leaving streaks of blood, before he ultimately collapses at the feet of the cameraman.
Sadistic, blatant and wanton criminal abuses at Abu Ghraib by Military Intelligence
American military Abu gharib prison photos, humiliation and torture — London Daily Mirror article: non-graphic, covered pictures War 2004 May images
Follow the torture trail — Part I
        When you talk with God        
         were you also spending your time, money and energy, killing people?         
       Are they now alive or dead?       Follow the torture trail — Part 2
Israeli torture — Part 1
Israeli torture and killing of children Torture and Bush
      U.S. War Crimes — Falluja photos — Graphic Images      
      US used chemical and thermobaric weapons in Fallujah     
Two American soldiers pose next to a pyramid of naked Iraqi prisoners, at Abu Ghraib prison near Baghdad, in this undated photo.
Photo: REUTERS/Courtesy of The New Yorker.
Kewe note May 2,2004, Updated June 25,2004
It isn't for this generation that I write this.   For the next and the next.   For those who in their various studies will be asking.   Why?   And will search the search engines, and perhaps will come across this.
There is no answer.   Democracy, as the dear President is so fond of saying.   (It's the only slender thread he has to hang onto)   That's why?
Even if the word democracy meant anything to Mr Bush it would not excuse this.   But to Bush, democracy means his class has all the power, and he is able to use the vast resources provided by taxpayer money, money taken from everyone's purse, to pursue his goals, and in this instance his (personal) goal.   And wasn't Iraq a personal goal.
If nothing else, I think even we in this time recognise that.
But it will not be democracy where Iraq's people find their equilibrium once this horror of a race who thinks themselves superior stop checking their identity and lining them up against a wall and placing bags over their heads and taking them to prison where there is a mutilating of minds and bodies — and the deaths, and the thousands of other physically abusing and spiritually humiliating happenings that we now know has been their daily lives this past year.
No, Iraq will find what it wants, what it can survive with, when it is allowed to go its way.   Likely some combination of a ruling boss, perhaps somewhat like Saddam but not as explicitly gangster, or, foolish, or evil…take you pick.
Or it will no longer be Iraq, but territories held by Kurds and Sunni and Shia.
It will not be the American 'democracy' of Bush.
I do hope in the next fifty and hundred years that the people of Iraq sue the pants of all who were involved in this.
For I think we are beginning to allow the suing for war.
We are reaching I believe, in my naiveté optimism, a balance-point where humanity is coming to an awareness that this type of action is not acceptable and will not be allowed.
Iraq may well be the acknowledgement of this horror, and a turning away; I hope so.
I do hope that the relatives of those 'close to' the 16,000, 30,000, 50,000 who are no longer with us sue.   And I hope that those 50,000, 100,000 who have been injured sue.
I hope that as we pass the torch of our generation to another that there will be those who take up this cry.   That the UK madman and his American 'believing in God is on my side' counterpart will finally be brought to justice.   That the permanent stain they have created — that we all will now have to live with — is etched in their minds, and for all of us, never forgotten.
The cries of the dead from the missiles, from the bombs, from the tanks call out for this.   The cries from those who will never again see their son or daughter, or mother or father, or brother or sister call out for this.
The cries of those many injured, who will never have the fulfilment of a life they could have had, call out for this.
I live in hope.   I am an optimist.   I hope by the next generation, or the next, that all trace of the madman of the UK will have been swept aside.   And all trace of the American ruling class that is the Bush family and its like will be gone.   I pray those who remain here seek their settlement.   Seek it in ways Americans seem to know so much about.   In money and in outrage.   For there is no other way you can settle this.
As to the Higher Power.   It will flow with what we wish.
And the lawsuits that can rage from now until eternity, yes, let them flow.
Let us never forget this.
Let us never forget the horrors that an overwhelming two powers have done this past year.

Let us never forget.
An American soldier surveys a group of bound Iraqi prisoners at the Abu Ghraib prison near Baghdad.
Photo: REUTERS/Courtesy of The New Yorker.
Kewe archives and photos of this and the present other wars.
Cook: — bring our lads home
Dennis Kucinich: We have to bring our troops home
Outsourced civilian workers who beat, raped and humiliated iraq prisoners cannot be charged under military law, and it is unclear whether they will face any charges under either US or Iraqi laws. The Madness of Tony Blair - Paranoia, Apocalyptic, Delusional
— his false belief strongly held in spite of invalidating evidence.
Brothers sit over the grave of their father who was killed during a fight between Iraq resistance and U.S. troops.
Photo: AP/Muhammed Muheisen
Kewe May 5, 2004, Updated June 25, 2004 — The role of the media in the third world war.
An audio clip prompted me to write this not-so-quiet epistle.   The clip was from an NPR reporter who has been in Iraq, reporting for the past year.
I know that NPR has to not have a trace of so-called 'bias.'   Heavens, next day Congress would be calling for a Constitutional Amendment banning Public Radio for all time.   (Not to mention cutting off what little remaining funding they now get from the government.)
But NPR is just one instance. 'Free' and 'unabridged' does not apply to the US media, anymore.
I say not any more.   I think a reporter might have an unpopular article published on air or paper in the days before control had passed to the select few republican controllers.
Bosses such as Murdoch, who not only heavily influences public opinion in the US through Fox and other outlets, but in the UK, and has bought up controlling interest in media in two thirds of the world.
We have degenerated into a state of Nazi thinking, and that means listening and obeying your superiors.
It of course comes from the top.   Nothing explicit stated of course, nothing really thought out clearly.  
No, nothing explicit.   Nothing stated.   Nothing really thought out.
Just 'the atmosphere,' the intense Nazi-similar atmosphere of 'get the job done.'
I am not sorry this offends some people.   People have to say it.   People have to speak for those many babies, just a small fraction seen in the pictures that stream down above these comments
People have to speak for the untold many children; for those untold many who have been hit by bombs, by military sniper shooting…by the many… People have to speak out for the adults, for all of these many killed and injured, these many abused.
'The role of the media in the third world war.'   It's all summed up in the excuse about the photos of the coffins, the excuse for not showing them…   'We didn't know'
'We didn't know they were taking photographs…' media executives, speaking for the media, said.
WE DIDN'T KNOW?
Economics professor William Nordhaus of Yale University:

“a significant burden on the federal budget, another straw on the camel's back...
... Like a teenager who gets further in debt on a credit card, the Bush administration is racking up costs that will have to be paid in the future in higher taxes or lower government programs.
The fiscal irresponsibility is really awesome.”
U.S. Debt
Congress will soon have to raise debt limit to 9 Trillion — Nine Trillion.
The role of the media in the second gulf war
The stovepipe — how CIA corruption gave documentation for the war
Iraqis gather around the graves of their loved ones.
Their relatives and friends were killed in the fighting of the Iraq resistance as they were attempting to defend their country from the US.
Photo: AP/Muhammed Muheisen
Kewe note May 2,2004:
The article underneath was taken off the website for a couple of days because the authenticity of it being real acts was in dispute.
It has been decided that the article be reinstated because:
1)    If it is a simulation, possibly as a joke, or possible as some military back room idea to make the Daily Mirror look foolish, due to its extensive coverage of Iraq in a more negative vein, it has been decided that the article should be posted to the site.
Whether a simulation or real, if a simulation the probability exists that it is taken from memories of those who created the simulation.
2)   The article is written as if the acts were committed by some rogue group.   Due to the number and variety of reports now coming through, from both US and UK military and prison sources, and a verification of reports by people who have undergone such abuse, as Amnesty International reports, it is much more likely that ill-treatment of detained people has been both widespread and extensive.
Reports, ranging from prior to 'UK soldier quizzed on Iraq prison torture — roll of photos turned into Photo shop May 2003,' to today, belie the protestations of extreme rarity.
Kewe note May 14,2004:
The Daily Mirror circus continues its journey with the UK Labour Party and Tony Blair being much more concerned with seeing that everyone knows that the photographs in the first Mirror article were fake.
It may be they are fake.   It may be the story is faked.   It may be the story is taken from the memories and stories of soldiers who have served in Iraq    
But to Blair and the Labour Party, never mind the subsequent articles, and the information coming forward from other sources which supports the Mirror allegations; they want people to think soldier abuse is all fake.

Fifteen minutes ago this was published:
Reuters: May 14, 2004
Danish troops serve under British command in southern Iraq, where two unnamed medics said that last September in Basra two Iraqi prisoners were brought in with signs of having suffered "rough treatment during an unauthorized interrogation in the field by a British unit," said a Danish ministry statement.
The incident was reported to British officials in September 2003.
"According to the information, one of the Iraqis was later to die of his injuries," the Danish ministry said.
It is not important to the UK goverment that they have sat on photos stemming from those reported to the police, photos brought into a UK photo shop a year ago, to the Amnesty reports given as far back as a year ago, to the incident that resulted in death reported today, given to the UK government in September 2003
What is important to Mr Blair is that what is perceived is that this is all fake.
That Blair is not addressing the issue, that he never intended to address the issue, and in fact that the UK army has repeatedly stalled on addressing the issue, is all too clear.
It is time that Blair resigned, not the Editor of the Mirror.
It is time that the UK brought home their troops.
A Washington Post report of a study done in Iraq states that more than 80% of the people do not want either the US or the UK armies in their country.
Neither country have any validity for being there, except to prop up the ego's of the people who sent the troops and sent bombs and have killed and injured....
Mr Blair needs to resign.
The UK needs to put this behind them.   (If they will ever be able to do that)
Unfortunately. like the Germans who have had to accept the role of the Nazi in their history, so now, the UK has this.       And the US.
But as a token to the Iraq people, getting rid of Blair is a start.
The Daily Mirror has said one of the British soldiers  (Soldier C - see below Third British soldier)  who claimed Iraqi prisoners were being abused is to appear on television on Friday May 14, 2004.
Editor Piers Morgan of the Daily Mirror urged people to hear the soldier's testimony and ignore ministers who claim photos printed in the newspaper are fake.
UPDATE: May 14, 2004
Daily Mirror editor Piers Morgan has been sacked after the newspaper conceded photos of British soldiers abusing an Iraqi were fake.
The Mirror board said Morgan would be stepping down immediately.
"The Daily Mirror published in good faith photographs which it absolutely believed were genuine images of British soldiers abusing an Iraqi prisoner," the newspaper said.
"However, there is now sufficient evidence to suggest that these pictures are fakes and that the Daily Mirror has been the subject of a calculated and malicious hoax."
In a television interview broadcast May 14, 2004, a man identified as "soldier C," reportedly a member of the Lancashire regiment, said he saw prisoners "beaten for fun."
"I saw prisoners being punched, slapped, kicked, pushed around, sand-bagged, zip-tied," said the man, whose face was not shown.
He is the only one of the Daily Mirror's sources who has spoken to military investigators, and does not claim to be a witness to the photos.
The abuse "wasn't all the army, it wasn't systematic, but it did happen," said soldier C.
A member of the Iraqi Civil Defense Corps (ICDC) gives the finishing touches to a painted Iraqi flag, (not the one chosen by the U.S. appointed governing council) in a mural near the entrance to one of their bases near the town of Abu Ghraib, west of Baghdad.

Photo: AFP/Roberto Schmidt
A member of the Iraqi Civil Defense Corps (ICDC) gives the finishing touches to a painted Iraqi flag, (not the one chosen by the U.S. appointed governing council) in a mural near the entrance to one of their bases near the town of Abu Ghraib, west of Baghdad.
Photo: AFP/Roberto Schmidt
Ten members of Rogers' unit gave evidence in court.
Their most frequently used phrase:
"I can't remember."
They said it six hundred and sixty-seven times!
Ten members of Craig Rogers unit gave evidence in court.

Their most frequently used phrase: 'I can't remember.'

They said it six hundred and sixty-seven times.

Others were also getting stuck in, but they were from the unit of Lieutenant Rogers, the men who appeared as witnesses but not in the dock.

According to another soldier, Rogers himself, an officer, was joining in:

'As I watched, I saw Lieutenant Rogers approach the first or second prisoner, pick him up and punch him through the sandbag to the head as a result of which the man fell to the floor.

'I then saw Lieutenant Rogers again lift the man so that he was in a standing position when he kicked him to the body. 

'As Lieutenant Rogers was doing this, members of the unit were doing the same.

'I could not believe what I was seeing was actually taking place.'

Rogers and several of his unit were mentioned repeatedly in the court-martial as being involved in the beatings. 

Lawyers acting for those who were on trial fear the court-martial has failed to get to the truth.

The facts are shocking, yet to read some of the coverage of the court-martial into the death of a prisoner you'd think the charges were somehow trumped up in an excess of political correctness.

There is nothing fabricated about the injuries to Baha Mousa or the fact that dozens of soldiers either joined in or witnessed the abuse.

So why is only one man facing punishment?

A scene of crime, there's a dead body.

There are men with internal bleeding, ruptured organs, broken bones.

They have sandbags over their heads, their hands are bound.

They're lying in their own excrement, semi-naked, semi-conscious, shaking, terrified.

They've been tortured for 36 hours.
Photo: BBC PANORAMA
The Queen's Lancashire Regiment were the soldiers.

And there was a key development.

A new shift of men took over guarding the detainees.

Wakey wakey.....

Others were also getting stuck in, but they were from the unit of Lieutenant Rogers, the men who appeared as witnesses but not in the dock.

According to another soldier, Rogers himself, an officer, was joining in:

'As I watched, I saw Lieutenant Rogers approach the first or second prisoner, pick him up and punch him through the sandbag to the head as a result of which the man fell to the floor.

'I then saw Lieutenant Rogers again lift the man so that he was in a standing position when he kicked him to the body. 

'As Lieutenant Rogers was doing this, members of the unit were doing the same.

'I could not believe what I was seeing was actually taking place.'

Rogers and several of his unit were mentioned repeatedly in the court-martial as being involved in the beatings. 

Lawyers acting for those who were on trial fear the court-martial has failed to get to the truth.

The facts are shocking, yet to read some of the coverage of the court-martial into the death of a prisoner you'd think the charges were somehow trumped up in an excess of political correctness.

There is nothing fabricated about the injuries to Baha Mousa or the fact that dozens of soldiers either joined in or witnessed the abuse.

So why is only one man facing punishment?

A scene of crime, there's a dead body.

There are men with internal bleeding, ruptured organs, broken bones.

They have sandbags over their heads, their hands are bound.

They're lying in their own excrement, semi-naked, semi-conscious, shaking, terrified.

They've been tortured for 36 hours.

Photo is of Craig Rogers

Photo: BBC PANORAMA
Others were also getting stuck in, but they were from the unit of Lieutenant Rogers, the men who appeared as witnesses but not in the dock.
According to another soldier, Rogers himself, an officer, was joining in:
'As I watched, I saw Lieutenant Rogers approach the first or second prisoner, pick him up and punch him through the sandbag to the head as a result of which the man fell to the floor.
'I then saw Lieutenant Rogers again lift the man so that he was in a standing position when he kicked him to the body.
'As Lieutenant Rogers was doing this, members of the unit were doing the same.
'I could not believe what I was seeing was actually taking place.'
Rogers and several of his unit were mentioned repeatedly in the court-martial as being involved in the beatings.
Lawyers acting for those who were on trial fear the court-martial has failed to get to the truth.
Photo is of Craig Rogers
Photo: BBC PANORAMA
Image inserted by TheWE.biz
Camp Bucca, a 'holding facility' with a history of allegations
The secure holding facility in the desert near the city of Umm Qasr, close to the Kuwaiti border, was originally called Camp Freddy and used by British forces to hold Iraqi prisoners of war.
But in April 2003 control of the camp was transferred to the Americans, although there was a "secure and discrete" unit within the camp that remained exclusively British.
In 2003 the British had control of two tent compounds, holding roughly 400 prisoners each.
The Americans had six similar compounds.
The camp is designed to hold between 2,000 and 2,500 prisoners but figures released in March 2006 estimated that it held 8,500 Iraqi detainees.
There have been a number of inquiries into alleged abusive treatment at the camp, mostly related to the Americans.
In February 2005 American soldiers killed four detainees and injured six others to quell a riot in which prisoners were armed with stones.
But the British have also been accused of abuse, specifically the hooding of prisoners, which led to concerns being raised with the International Committee of the Red Cross.
Six of the men detained with Baha Mousa were later taken to Camp Bucca.
Conditions in the camp are known to be primitive, with open trenches used as lavatories.
The prisoners were forced to sleep on the desert floor, at risk from scorpions and snakes, and were only given one blanket at night when temperatures can fall below zero.
Since May 2003, 27 prisoners have escaped from Camp Bucca, 18 of whom have been recaptured.
A number of attempts at mass escape have been foiled.
The Ministry of Defence says that apart from two spells in 2003, Camp Bucca has been run by the Americans.
Soldiers in the dock
Camp Breadbasket
On 15 May 2003 the 1st Battalion of the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers captured Iraqis looting an aid camp in Operation Ali-Baba.
They were detained for a brief period during which they were beaten, forced to simulate oral and anal sex and suspended from a forklift truck.
Later that month, Fusilier Gary Bartlam, 20, of Tamworth, Staffordshire, took a film to be developed containing 22 photographs of abuse taking place.
This triggered a lengthy court martial at a British Army barracks in Osnabruck, Germany. Bartlam pleaded guilty to three charges of ill treatment of Iraqi prisoners.
Cpl Daniel Kenyon, 33, from Newcastle, denied six charges of abuse.
He was convicted of three, cleared of two charges and the remaining charge was dropped.
L/Cpl Mark Cooley, 25, from Newcastle, denied two charges of abuse but was found guilty of both. L/Cpl Darren Larkin, 30, from Oldham, Greater Manchester, admitted to one charge of assault but denied another.
The second charge was dropped.
Camp Breadbasket

On 15 May 2003 the 1st Battalion of the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers captured Iraqis looting an aid camp in Operation Ali-Baba.

They were detained for a brief period during which they were beaten, forced to simulate oral and anal sex and suspended from a forklift truck.

Later that month, Fusilier Gary Bartlam, 20, of Tamworth, Staffordshire, took a film to be developed containing 22 photographs of abuse taking place.

This triggered a lengthy court martial at a British Army barracks in Osnabruck, Germany. Bartlam pleaded guilty to three charges of ill treatment of Iraqi prisoners.

Cpl Daniel Kenyon, 33, from Newcastle, denied six charges of abuse.

He was convicted of three, cleared of two charges and the remaining charge was dropped.

L/Cpl Mark Cooley, 25, from Newcastle, denied two charges of abuse but was found guilty of both. L/Cpl Darren Larkin, 30, from Oldham, Greater Manchester, admitted to one charge of assault but denied another.

The second charge was dropped.
Photo: BBC PANORAMA
Britain's first convicted war criminal
Baha Mousa
The hotel worker and son of an Iraqi police colonel died on 16 September 2003 while in custody of the Queen's Lancashire Regiment at a detention centre near Basra.
The building had formerly been the secret service headquarters of Ali Majid (Chemical Ali).
Cpl Donald Payne, 36, became Britain's first convicted war criminal when he admitted inhumanely treating civilian detainees.
Six other soldiers were cleared by a military court in Bulford, Wiltshire, of abusing Mr Mousa and other detainees.
©2007 Independent Digital (UK) Ltd.  All rights reserved
"I am bleeding, my nose is broken."
"Have mercy on me, I am going to die."
'I am bleeding, my nose is broken.   Have mercy on me, I am going to die.'

There was an old latrine, just a hall of cesspits, and there was a man who was bound and made to lie with his nose hanging over that latrine and he'd been thrown around and he'd soiled himself and he was lying in his own urine.

The detainee, nicknamed granddad, hooded in the next room, heard his friend's last moments.

KIFAH MUTAIRI — Iraqi detainee 'Grandad'

On the last night I could hear Baha's voice was further from me, but I could tell he was in the next room.

He was getting tortured and he would groan because the torture was so bad.

Panorama reporter PAUL KENYON: There was a struggle.

Baha Mousa was at the end of his strength.

Corporal Payne was restraining him with his knee in his back.

A charge of manslaughter against Payne was thrown out.

KIFAH MUTAIRI — Iraqi detainee 'Grandad':

He was shouting: 'I am bleeding, my nose is broken.

'Have mercy on me, I am going to die.'

Then his voice disappeared.'

Panorama reporter PAUL KENYON: He died of postural asphyxia.

In simple terms he'd been unable to breathe.

His ribs were fractured and he had 93 separate injuries.

Nobody has been convicted over the death of Baha Mousa.

Photo: BBC PANORAMA


There was an old latrine, just a hall of cesspits, and there was a man who was bound and made to lie with his nose hanging over that latrine and he'd been thrown around and he'd soiled himself and he was lying in his own urine.
The detainee, nicknamed granddad, hooded in the next room, heard his friend's last moments.
KIFAH MUTAIRI — Iraqi detainee 'Grandad'
On the last night I could hear Baha's voice was further from me, but I could tell he was in the next room.
He was getting tortured and he would groan because the torture was so bad.
Panorama reporter PAUL KENYON:
There was a struggle.
Baha Mousa was at the end of his strength.
Corporal Payne was restraining him with his knee in his back.
A charge of manslaughter against Payne was thrown out.
KIFAH MUTAIRI — Iraqi detainee 'Grandad':
He was shouting: 'I am bleeding, my nose is broken.
'Have mercy on me, I am going to die.'
Then his voice disappeared.'
Panorama reporter PAUL KENYON:
He died of postural asphyxia.
In simple terms he'd been unable to breathe.
His ribs were fractured and he had 93 separate injuries.
Nobody has been convicted over the death of Baha Mousa.
'I am bleeding, my nose is broken.   Have mercy on me, I am going to die.'

There was an old latrine, just a hall of cesspits, and there was a man who was bound and made to lie with his nose hanging over that latrine and he'd been thrown around and he'd soiled himself and he was lying in his own urine.

The detainee, nicknamed granddad, hooded in the next room, heard his friend's last moments.

KIFAH MUTAIRI — Iraqi detainee 'Grandad'

On the last night I could hear Baha's voice was further from me, but I could tell he was in the next room.

He was getting tortured and he would groan because the torture was so bad.

Panorama reporter PAUL KENYON: There was a struggle.

Baha Mousa was at the end of his strength.

Corporal Payne was restraining him with his knee in his back.

A charge of manslaughter against Payne was thrown out.

KIFAH MUTAIRI — Iraqi detainee 'Grandad':

He was shouting: 'I am bleeding, my nose is broken.

'Have mercy on me, I am going to die.'

Then his voice disappeared.'

Panorama reporter PAUL KENYON: He died of postural asphyxia.

In simple terms he'd been unable to breathe.

His ribs were fractured and he had 93 separate injuries.

Nobody has been convicted over the death of Baha Mousa.

Photo: BBC PANORAMA
Iraqi mother of Nadhem Abdullah holds his picture in Farakah.
A court hearing the case of seven British troops accused of beating Abdullah to death, also heard that the same soldiers savagely attacked a taxi driver at the same time.
Charges against the seven British soldiers accused of murdering Iraqi teenager dismissed.
Judge ruled insufficient evidence — November 3, 2005

Brutal attack by soldiers left innocent Iraqi dead, court told
Seven paras accused of murder at court martial
Owen Bowcott
Tuesday September 6, 2005
An army court martial yesterday heard the first graphic account of how seven British soldiers allegedly carried out a "brutal" and "unprovoked" attack on a group of Iraqi civilians that led to the death of an unarmed teenager from severe head injuries.
The paratroopers, who appeared at the hearing in Colchester, Essex, and have been charged with murder, were alleged to have used rifle butts, helmets, fists and feet to batter the occupants of an intercepted Toyota pick-up truck.
Two women who tried to intervene were "hit and hurt", the court martial was told. One of them was pregnant. A dog that barked at the patrol was shot dead.
The hearing was told that witnesses had heard the soldiers laughing and clapping.
On the opening day of the long-anticipated military case - which dates back to May 2003, three weeks after the formal end to hostilities - the chief prosecutor, Martin Heslop QC, gave a detailed narrative of the incident which allegedly led to the death of 18-year-old Nadhem Abdullah.
Military courtroom in Colchester.

The military panel was directed to clear the defendants of the charges

Photo: BBC
Military courtroom in Colchester
The military panel was directed to clear the defendants of the charges
Photo: BBC
Photos inserted by TheWE.biz
Corporal Scott Evans, 32, and Privates Billy Nerney, 24, Samuel May, 25, Morné Vosloo, 26, Daniel Harding, 25, Roberto Di-Gregorio, 24 and Scott Jackson, 26, all deny murder and violent disorder.
Before describing the event Mr Heslop asked each of them whether they pleaded guilty to murder and violent disorder.
Each of the men, who were all members of the 3rd Battalion the Parachute Regiment, in turn answered: "No, sir."
"The Crown case is that [these men] entered a small Iraqi village in two vehicles," Mr Heslop said. Once in the village they brutally assaulted a number of unarmed Iraqis, causing fatal injuries.
"In the course of the assault they used helmets, rifle butts, fists and feet. Two women who tried to intervene were hit and hurt. One was pregnant. A dog that was barking was shot dead.
"This is not a case of soldiers responding to an attack nor being required to defend themselves in an operational engagement. This was nothing more than gratuitous violence meted out to unarmed civilians."
The assaults, Mr Heslop added, were "unjustified and wholly unprovoked".
Evidence against the men, he said, came from a number of sources. Iraqi witnesses could not individually identify them, but they saw British soldiers and vehicles. No other units were in the area at the time, Mr Heslop explained.
Boot marks on the clothes of the injured Toyota driver, Athar Saddam, matched those worn by several patrol members, the court heard.
Blood recovered from the screw recess of Private May's rifle butt matched the DNA profile of Mr Abdullah's family. Private May was second-in-command of the patrol, which was led by Corporal Evans.
Radio messages sent from the patrol that day confirmed they had followed a car from a checkpoint, Mr Heslop said.
Later two of the accused - Privates Di-Gregorio and Vosloo - acknowledged there had been an incident that day.
Mr Heslop said the men were all charged with murder on the basis of "joint enterprise" in that they had either "inflicted blows" or had later protected those who carried out the assaults.
The patrol, the court heard, had been out that day to stop so-called "Ali Ba Bas" trying to smuggle money through Iran. The soldiers, it was suggested, may have mistaken the Toyota pick-up for a similar vehicle.
The patrol followed the truck into Al-Ferkah in southern Iraq where it was dropping off locals who had been to market. The two army vehicles boxed in the Toyota.
"The deceased [Mr Abdullah] and the driver were dragged out and made to lie down," Mr Heslop said. "The men were assaulted. During the assault the driver's sister, Dalal, tried to stop it. She was struck by one of the soldiers on the mouth.
"Nadhem Abdullah was struck about the head and body. He and the driver were rendered unconscious."
Leaving them behind, the soldiers went on to assault two brothers who had earlier left the vehicle, Kazem and Zugraher Al-Mohamadawi, Mr Heslop told the court.
"Witnesses described the soldiers laughing and clapping their hands."
After the patrol left, Mr Abdullah and Mr Saddam were taken to a hospital in nearby Amara. Mr Saddam was suffering internal bleeding to the back of his head, thought to have been caused by a rifle butt.
No neurosurgeon was on duty so he was driven to Basra but he died on the way. His body could not be exhumed for a postmortem examination.
"However, the Crown has no doubts that Mr Abdullah died as a result of the battering he received from the soldiers," Mr Heslop added.
The men's commanding officer, Captain Andrew Blackmore, the court heard, interviewed the soldiers on their return to base that night.
He reported finding them excited and hyped up but they denied that anything had happened.
The court martial is being held in a converted military warehouse in the flagstaff compound in Colchester. The building was previously used for testing uniforms and equipment.
A visit by lawyers to Al-Ferkah was yesterday postponed because of deteriorating security. A video of the scene will instead be shown to the court martial next week.
The proceedings of a general court martial are similar to a civilian crown court. The judge advocate, Judge Jeff Blackett, is a civilian.
Instead of a jury there is a seven-member panel which delivers the verdict.
It comprises six men and one woman of varying ranks between brigadier and warrant officer.
If any of the accused are found guilty the panel, working with the judge, will also decide upon the sentence.
The seven former and serving soldiers accused are represented by civilian barristers and solicitors. The judge ordered that their home addresses should not be revealed.
Three of the soldiers who have since left the army are deemed to have been re-enlisted for the duration of the trial. If convicted, they will serve their time in a military prison.
The hearing was adjourned until next Monday.
· The seven men are charged with two offences each, murder and violent disorder. The accused, who appeared in court, were Corporal Scott Evans, Private Billy Nerney, Private Samuel May and Private Morné Vosloo. All four are still serving members of the 3rd battalion, the Parachute regiment.
The other three accused - Private Scott Jackson, Private Daniel Harding and Private Roberto Di-Gregorio - are all former members of the 3rd battalion, the Parachute regiment.
All seven men deny the charges.
The other cases
· Ahmed Jabber Kareem, a 16-year-old, died after being arrested by three Irish Guards on May 8, 2003.
It is alleged he and three other Iraqis were marched at gunpoint to a dock near the Shatt al-Arab waterway in Basra and forced to jump in. The Army Prosecuting Authority (APA) is considering charges.
· Said Shabram was herding sheep with another man in the former marine base in Basra on May 24, 2003.
A British soldier is is said to have told them to follow him to the dockside and, after they did so, they were ordered to stand at the water's edge before being pushed in.
Shouts at US taxpayer paid occupation forces
Said Shabram drowned despite a rescue attempt by another soldier.
The APA is deliberating whether to charge an officer and two soldiers from 32 Engineer regiment. They could face joint murder charges over his death.
Guardian Unlimited © Guardian Newspapers Limited 2005
Read below how fascists in the US forced the sacking of Mirror Editor Piers Morgan, editor of the newspaper that won the 2003 Pride of Britain award for acticles leading up to the war, and subsequent articles.
The US fascist elite that still hold controlling interest in The Mirror couldn't stand the truth.
New Statesman   May 31, 2004    Cover Story — John Pilger
Shareholders wanted the Mirror editor out long before the allegedly bogus photos.
Piers Morgan was sacked as editor of the Daily Mirror because he ran the only popular newspaper in Britain to expose the "war on terror" as a fraud and the invasion of Iraq as a crime.
He was marked long before the Mirror published the apparently faked pictures of British troops torturing Iraqi prisoners.
On 4 July 2002, American Independence Day, the Mirror published a report of mine, displayed on the front page under the headline "Mourn on the Fourth of July" and showing Bush flanked by the Stars and Stripes.
Above him were the words: "George W Bush's policy of bomb first and find out later has killed double the number of civilians who died on 11 September. The USA is now the world's leading rogue state".
It was the Mirror at its most potent; not since it distinguished itself as the first mass-circulation paper in the western world to oppose the US invasion of Vietnam and, before that, the British invasion of Suez, had it confronted the rapacious policies of a British government and its principal ally.
Most of the media were then consumed and manipulated by the fake issue of Iraq's non-existent weapons of mass destruction:  "45 minutes from attack", said the London Evening Standard front page; "He's got 'em . . . let's get him", said the Sun.
In contrast, the Mirror reported that Bush and Blair were lying, that the "liberation" of Afghanistan had installed warlords as barbaric as the Taliban, that US forces had killed almost double the number of civilians killed in the twin towers on 11 September 2001, and that the coming invasion of Iraq had been long planned.
It was certainly not the first to say this, but it made sense of it for a popular readership.
The day after the "mourn on the Fourth of July" piece was published, a senior executive of the New York investment company Tweedy Browne, major shareholders in the Trinity Mirror newspaper group, called the Mirror and shouted down the phone at senior management, demanding Morgan's head and mine.
This pressure continued as the Murdoch press in the United States and other lunar right-wing papers and broadcasters railed against the "treacherous" Mirror.
When, on 1 May last, the Mirror published its "torture" photographs, Tweedy Browne again led the charge of powerful shareholders, notably Fidelity Asset Management, the biggest mutual company in America, run by the billionaire Edward C Johnson III, a donor to the Bush re-election campaign.
"We will have to look very carefully," said an executive of Deutsche Asset Management, another shareholder, "at what Trinity Mirror does next in order to protect the value of the Mirror brand."
Was corporate influence on the press, and its right to be wrong, ever more eloquently expressed?
Morgan had only just survived a year earlier when a new Trinity Mirror senior management under the chief executive, Sly Bailey, ordered him to "tone down" the anti-war coverage and return the paper to celebrities and faithless butlers (who had never departed).
In the following months, the Mirror, along with the other anti-war daily newspaper in Britain, the Independent, was vindicated.   Today, Bush and Blair are universally distrusted and reviled, and the defeat of their atrocious enterprise seems assured.
In bringing this truth to the public, the Mirror departed from the pack as no popular paper has, and the part it played ought not to be buried in the mire of Fleet Street.
For two years, the Mirror represented a majority of the British people, whose critical understanding of Blair's pre-invasion charade was always ahead of journalists'.
The Mirror did what a newspaper is meant to do: it kept the record straight.
Instead of channelling and amplifying official lies, the Mirror more often than not challenged and exposed them to a readership often dismissed or patronised by those claiming to know what "the public really wants".
Since Morgan's departure, no newspaper has demanded that the Ministry of Defence produce the "incontrovertible evidence" that the Mirror's photographs were faked.
The hearsay and apologetics of a regiment with a documented record of brutality in Iraq, facing at least five murder prosecutions, have been accepted.
If the Mirror was stitched up, was it merely for money?
Instead of pursuing that, as the editors of MediaLens website point out, "a cowed media lined up to heap invective on the sacked editor and to declare the decision 'correct', 'necessary', 'inevitable'".
Below is an article by the Independent Newspaper May 2, 2004
Seven Iraqis die in uk custody none charged
Amid the furore caused by yesterday's publication of photographs showing British troops abusing Iraqi prisoners were claims by the Ministry of Defence and General Sir Michael Jackson, the Chief of the General Staff, that the photographs were of an isolated incident caused by the "ill discipline of a few soldiers".
But it is a year and two days since Ather Karen al-Mowafakia died in British custody in Basra.
During the next five months another six men died while in the custody of British soldiers.
Soldier quizzed on Iraq prisoner torture
This article was first reported by The Sun in May 2003        
Twelve months ago photographs showing Iraqi prisoners strung up in a net from a fork lift truck were published in The Sun.
Other pictures showed bodies lying on the ground and there were several shots of UK soldiers apparently committing sex acts near prisoners.
Again the investigation launched by the Ministry of Defence into the soldiers who were allegedly involved, including Gary Bartlam, 18, of the Royal Fusiliers, has not been completed.
A Ministry of Defence spokeswoman said the first week of May 2004 that some soldiers were facing charges but the Army Prosecuting Authority had not yet decided whether or not the charges should be brought.
They are believed to involve indecent and cruel conduct.
But the soldiers are still serving, some in Kosovo.


The article that the Ministry declares the photos false.
UK troops batter with rifle butts — warning both this and the article below has extremely abusive content
This is an article published Friday May 7, 2004 by the Mirror.
A third British soldier has come forward to speak of a sickening campaign of abuse against Iraqi POWs.
On BBC radio 4 last night the editor of the Daily Mirror was questioned about the article.
He stated that the people of Basra (where the British troups are stationed) have known about this situation since last summer.
Soldier C told the Mirror that suspects had "10 kids of crap" beaten out of them and said officers only stepped in when the appalling beatings got too heavy.
...He went up to one of the prisoners who still had a sandbag on his face and was poking his fingers into his eyeballs until the guy was screaming in pain.
Mirror headline of May 8rd, 2004
Click on cover for link to the London Daily Mirror
See below for article — Fourth soldier
“I've said today that there are a lot more photographs and videos that exist.  

If these are released to the public, obviously it's going to make matters worse.   That's just a fact,” Rumsfeld said.

“I mean I looked at them last night and they're hard to believe," he said.  

“And if they're sent to some news organization and taken out of the criminal prosecution channels that they're in, that's where we'll be.  

And it's not a pretty picture.”
Kewe note:  This guy quoted below has 20 million radio listerners daily in the US, the most (last I heard) popular radio show in the US.   His name is Rush Limbaugh:
“This is no different than what happens at the Skull and Bones initiation, and we're going to ruin people's lives over it, and we're going to hamper our military effort, and then we are going to really hammer them because they had a good time.
You know, these people are being fired at every day.   I'm talking about people having a good time, these people, you ever heard of emotional release?   You [ever] heard of need to blow some steam off?
I don't understand what we're so worried about.   These are the people that are trying to kill us.   What do we care what is the most humiliating thing in the world for them?   There's also this business of them all wearing hoods and how that’s also very humiliating.   You can see more guys wearing hoods at a [Sen.] Robert Byrd birthday party 40 years ago than we've seen in these prisoner photos.
Kewe:   Rearrly Rush!
Can you give me an example where 'these people' have been trying to kill Americans.
They were not involved in 911.
Or anything else, as far as I know.
Check out the photographs on this site.
Look at all the Iraq citizens killed, maimed and injured.
More on Rush Limbaugh.   Remember, this guy has 20, million daily radio listerners.   Can you wonder why the US has gone so wrong.
“There's only one thing to do here, folks, and that's achieve victory over people who have targeted us for loooong, long time, well over 15, 20 years.”
Kewe:   Rearrly Rush!
Can you give me an example where 'these people' have been trying to kill Americans except to defend and rid their country of us.
They were not involved in 911.
Or anything else, as far as I know.
We attacked them.
Or perhaps I am mistaken?
They came over to America and attacked us, in both wars and in-between.
Have you listened to your own words for so long that you start quoting them as fact.
Do the people who put out your show, the thousands of radio stations across the country, have an inkling of conscience about broadcasting such drivel?   More of Rush Limbaugh:
“It's the only way to deal with this, and that's why obsessing about a single incident or two of so-called abuse in a prison is nothing more than a giant distraction and could up being something that will really ties [sic] our hands and handcuffs us in what the real objective is here, which is the preservation of our way of life and our country.”
“And that's why I'm not going to sit here and obsess and join the rest of the media with this and turn this into a campaign issue, try to convince as many people that George Bush is incompetent and needs to be thrown out of office — because that's all this is.   But in the process, what all that does is weaken the resolve of the people of this country…”
Kewe:  You're darn right about that.   Darn right.   It this gets us out of this mess.   If this gets the people who are ultimately responsible out of office, and we all know who they are.....
On a more sombre note:   People who commit physical abuse, and, or, force sexual acts from those they have command over, those they control, are tapping into a stream of evil.
Those who have lost their way, who have lost their compass and do not recognize this, are either extremely confused, or are also tapping into a stream of evil.
It may not be the same stream, but the stream that encloses seeks to negate and void the values and life situations that most of us as human beings aspire to.
Iraq — US killing and abuse
War 2004 May images
Richard Myers showing his version of humanity.   Richard Myers is a general and the U.S Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.   He is speaking at Camp Bondsteel, a U.S military base, some 40 kilometres from the Kosovo's capital of Pristina.  
The photos of the American invasion of Iraq — May 2004
In an interview with French weekly Le Journal du Dimanche, released before publication on Sunday, Turki said he had warned US administrator Paul Bremer of the abuse in November 2003.
“Spec. Sabrina D. Harman, a military police officer has been charged with abusing detainees at the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq”
Amnesty report UN soldiers in Kosovo are securing immunity from prosecution — its personnel are seeking to hush up their shameful part in the abuse of trafficked women and girls
U.S. soldiers who detained an elderly Iraqi woman last year placed a harness on her, made her crawl on all fours and rode her like a donkey.         She has recovered physically but remains traumatized.
US troops wrap man in cellophane — prison victim had front teeth missing.     Face had the marks of a brutal beating.
British lawyer Phil Shiner represented 14 Iraqi families at London's High Court, May 5, 2004.

The families state their relatives were unlawfully killed by British troops.
The Ministry of Defence refuses to accept responsibility for the deaths but the families' lawyers are demanding a judicial review to examine whether the killings are a violation of the victims' right to life under the European law.
Photo: REUTERS/Peter Macdiarmid, May 5, 2004
       Human Rights Lawyer of the Year       
       Phil Shiner report to World Tribunal       
       War Crimes — Illegality of Preventive Attack       
       Unilateral Use of Force       
Reuters News     December 14, 2004
Dead Iraqi's Family Wins Demand for UK Abuse Probe
— By Andrew Cawthorne
LONDON — In a test case over British troops' alleged abuse of Iraqi civilians, a London court on Tuesday backed demands for an independent inquiry into claims a Basra hotel worker was beaten to death by UK soldiers.
The High Court ruling in favor of Iraqi relatives of Baha Mousa — who died during detention in UK-controlled Basra — was hailed by rights activists as a victory in their campaign for accountability of troops involved in the U.S.-led occupation.
"Today is an historic day for human rights," said Phil Shiner, lawyer for Mousa's family.
"All the cases of torture by UK soldiers during the occupation of Iraq — including the most terrible of all where Baha Mousa was tortured to death — must now be investigated."
Abuse allegations against occupying soldiers hit world headlines earlier this year with graphic images of U.S. soldiers' mistreatment of prisoners at Baghdad's Abu Ghraib jail.
The American cases have been more numerous, but the behavior of some British troops has been sufficiently worrying to draw protests from the Red Cross and Amnesty International.
Mousa, 26, was held during a September 2003 raid on a hotel.
His blood-caked corpse was returned to his family days later.
"He had been beaten so severely I could not bear to look at him," his father Daoud Mousa said in Britain at the start of the High Court case.
"I am not against British troops in Iraq and I am glad that Saddam Hussein has gone, but all my family demands is justice for the horrific death of my son."
Nervous of a flood of cases against troops, Prime Minister Tony Blair's government said it may appeal Tuesday's ruling.
"I AM DYING...BLOOD...BLOOD"
Despite approving Mousa's case, the High Court threw out similar appeals by Iraqi relatives of another five locals who died in shooting incidents round the southern Basra area.
It said the European Convention on Human Rights was valid in British territorial outposts such as prisons, even when they were on another state's territory.
That covered Mousa's case, but not the other five who died in street incidents beyond British bases.
Their families say they were shot dead by soldiers while going about their daily lives — at home, attending a funeral, driving home from work, visiting a judge and eating dinner.
Judge Bernard Rix said the government's view the European charter did not extend to Iraq was an "unhappy submission ... about a country which was one of the cradles of civilisation."
The Ministry of Defense welcomed the ruling on the five, saying rules for peacetime Europe could not apply to Iraq.
"This decision is important for current and future operations since in Iraq, where UK armed forces are regularly fired upon and regularly return fire in self defense, it is not possible for us to adopt procedures such as the immediate establishment of a police cordon to enable the painstaking collection of forensic evidence," it added.
On Mousa, the MOD said it was requesting permission to appeal, and the case was subject to an internal probe by the Army Prosecution Authority: "This case is one of three incidences of deaths in detention in Iraq... For legal reasons it is not possible to comment further."
During the High Court hearing, a colleague of Mousa told of laughing soldiers abusing detainees by beating, pouring freezing water and practising "kick-boxing" on them, and punishing them if they failed to name European footballers.
Kifah Taha al-Mutari, arrested at the same time as Mousa, also told the court he heard Mousa die.
"I could hear him moaning through the walls... I heard him say 'I am dying ... blood ... blood.' I heard nothing further."
       Human Rights Lawyer of the Year       
       Phil Shiner report to World Tribunal       
       War Crimes — Illegality of Preventive Attack       
       Unilateral Use of Force       
The Independent     December 15, 2004     By ROBERT FISK
"They Laughed at Him and Kicked Him More"
Baha Mousa, 26, was working as a hotel receptionist in Basra 14 months ago when British troops surrounded the building and arrested seven men.  They were taken to a British base and were reportedly hooded and beaten.  Two days later, Mousa was dead.
His family was given $3,000 in compensation and rejected a further $5,000.  What they wanted was justice.  Yesterday, after more than a year of official stonewalling, his relatives won a 'historic' ruling to force the MoD to hold an independent inquiry. Will the truth now be known?
British soldiers of the Queen's Lancashire Regiment surrounded a Basra hotel in September last year following information that weapons were being kept in the building. One of the owners was later arrested.
Decided to revenge themselves upon his son because he revealed the ft.
When Daoud Mousa, an Iraqi police colonel, turned up at the hotel, he discovered his son lying on the ground with his hands tied behind his back.
He told The Independent his son had seen British soldiers looting the hotel safe and that a British officer had later ordered the soldiers to hand the cash back and that they should be disarmed.
Baha Mousa's father later claimed the British troops involved decided to revenge themselves upon his son because he had revealed the ft.
In their written judgment yesterday, Lord Justice Rix and Mr Justice Forbes criticised "the dilatoriness of the investigative process" conducted by the Special Investigation Branch (SIB) of the Royal Military Police, stating it was difficult to say whether the SIB investigation "has been timely, open or effective".
Investigations by The Independent showed that Mr Mousa repeatedly complained to his British attackers that he was having difficulty breathing.
Other Iraqi detainees were also reported to have been cruelly beaten.
When Baha's father, Daoud, and brother, Alaa, went to see another of those arrested, Kifah Taha, they did not know Baha had been killed.
I hope God will not show any human what I witnessed
"Kifah looked like half a human, he was so badly beaten," Alaa said.  "When we asked him about Baha, he said he didn't know.  Then he said:  'I hope God will not show any human what I witnessed.'''
Colonel Daoud Mousa told The Independent after his son's death that a British officer, a 2nd Lieutenant, promised that his son would be protected after his arrest.  "Three days later, I was looking at my son's body," the colonel said.
"The British came to say he had 'died in custody'.
His nose was broken.
There was blood above his mouth and I could see the bruising of his ribs and thighs.
The skin was ripped off his wrists where the handcuffs had been."
Baha Mousa left two small boys, five-year-old Hassan and three-year-old Hussein.
Both are now orphans, because Baha's 22-year-old wife had died of cancer just six months before his own death.
When The Independent initially made enquiries about Baha Mousa's death, British officers in Basra seemed unconcerned, referring all enquiries to the Ministry of Defence in London and repeating that the Queen's Lancashire Regiment was no longer operating in Southern Iraq.
Not one of the prisoners taken at the hotel said he had been questioned about the alleged discovery of weapons in the building.
The arrested men were taken to the former Iraqi secret service headquarters of Ali Hassann al-Majid, Saddam Hussain's brutal cousin, known as "Chemical Ali" for his gassing of the Kurds of Halabja, which was now part of a British military compound.
We were crying and screaming
One of the detainees was to recount to The Independent an appalling story of cruelty:  "We were put in a big room with our hands tied and with bags over our heads.
"But I could see through some holes in my hood.
Soldiers would come in, ordinary soldiers, not officers — mostly with their heads shaved, but in uniform — and they would kick us, picking on one after the other.
"They were kick-boxing us in the chest and between the legs and in the back.
We were crying and screaming.
They set on Baha especially and he kept crying that he couldn't breath in the hood.
He kept asking them to take the bag off and said he was suffocating.
"But they laughed at him and kicked him more.
One of them said: 'Stop screaming and you will be able to breathe more easily'
"Baha was so scared.
Then they increased the kicking on him and he collapsed on the floor.
None of us could stand or sit because it was too painful."
UK soldier quizzed on Iraq prison torture — roll of photos turned into Photo shop May 2003
(Not the photos published May 1, 2004)
Update January 2005
Amnesty: Treatment of prisoners — July 2003
Amnesty: Torture not isolated — April 2004
    “It is not secret at all, there are many Israeli experts who are transferring to the Americans their accumulative experience of thirty seven years of torturing and mistreating Palestinians,” al-Sanai told Aljazeera.net.

He said that American officers joined Israeli army units in Jenin several months ago for the purpose of learning Israeli methods and techniques of repressing civilians, which the Americans, he said, later applied in Iraq.

“It took Israel 37 years to develop and perfect these barbaric methods of repression and humiliation.   Surprisingly, the Americans surpassed and outmatched the Israelis in their savagery in less than two years.”
Amnesty International
    Tapes show abuse of 9/11 detainess at New York detention facility.
An investigation by Inspector General Glenn A. Fine also found that officials at the Metropolitan Detention Center (MDC) in Brooklyn, N.Y., which is run by the U.S. Bureau of Prisons, improperly taped meetings between detainees and their lawyers, and used excessive strip searches and restraints to punish those in confinement.
The report concluded that as many as 20 guards were involved in the abuse, which included slamming prisoners against walls and painfully twisting their arms and hands.
"Some officers slammed and bounced detainees against the wall, twisted their arms and hands in painful ways, stepped on their leg restraint chains and punished them by keeping them restrained for long periods of time."
    AP report of torture
    Abuse of Reuters journalists — transcripts of interviews and US Army summary as response.
Torture Part I
EU concealed deal with US to allow 'rendition' flights
The European Union secretly allowed the United States to use transit facilities on European soil to transport "criminals" in 2003, according to a previously unpublished document.
The revelation contradicts repeated EU denials that it knew of "rendition" flights by the CIA.
...Asked in Parliament last week about reports of 400 suspect flights passing through British airports, Tony Blair said: "In respect of airports, I don't know what you are referring to."
The minutes of the Athens meeting on January 22, 2003, were written by the n Greek presidency of the EU after the talks with a US delegation headed by a justice department official. EU officials confirmed that a full account was circulated to all member governments, and would have been sent to the Home Office.
...According to the full version, "Both sides agreed on areas where co-operation could be improved [inter alia] the exchange of data between border management services, increased use of European transit facilities to support the return of criminal/ inadmissible aliens, co-ordination with regard to false documents training and improving the co-operation in removals."
...But this section, and others referring to US policy, were deleted — as a "courtesy" to Washington, according to a spokesman for the EU Council of Ministers.
      By Justin Stares in Brussels and Philip Sherwell in Washington      
      Telegraph.co.uk       December 11, 2005      
New Statesman — May 2004
America's Gulag
Stephen Grey
Stephen Grey uncovers a secret global network of prisons and planes that allows the US to hand over its enemies for interrogation, and sometimes torture, by the agents of its more unsavoury allies.
The airline's operations are embarrassing because they highlight intense co-operation with regimes of countries such as Egypt, Syria and Pakistan, which are criticised for their human rights record.
The movements of these planes expose a vast archipelago of prison camps and centres where America can carry out torture by proxy.
The operations are illegal, in that they violate the anti-torture convention promoted by George W Bush which prohibits the transfer of suspects abroad for torture.
...The former CIA agent Bob Baer, who worked covertly for the US across the Middle East until the mid-1990s, describes how each Middle Eastern country has a purpose in the archipelago.
He says: “If you want a serious interrogation, you send a prisoner to Jordan.
If you want them to be tortured, you send them to Syria.
If you want someone to disappear — never to see them again — you send them to Egypt.”
...In Uzbekistan, a maverick British ambassador, Craig Murray, was put on sick leave after he publicly exposed human rights abuses, including execution of Islamist dissidents by boiling alive.
Uzbekistan is one of Britain's and America's closest allies in central Asia because it has provided bases that have enabled operations into Afghanistan.
The US is settling in for a long-term presence in return for tolerating human-rights abuses.

On 23 October 2001, witnesses saw Jamil Qasim Saeed Mohammed being bundled on board a Gulfstream V, registration N379P, by a group of masked men.
The plane flew Jamil Qasim Saeed Mohammed to Jordan.
The following day, the Gulfstream flew to Glasgow Prestwick to refuel, then back to Dulles International near Washington DC.
Amnesty International has repeatedly requested information from the US authorities about the current whereabouts and legal status of Jamil Qasim Saeed Mohammed, but has received no reply.
      CIA Rendition Flights Used UK Airfields      
      Amnesty International      December 15, 2005      
November 17, 2004      www.DemocracyNow.org
The Sunday Times of London has obtained evidence that the US government is leasing a special Gulfstream Jet to transport detained suspects to other nations that routinely use torture in their prisons.
Logs for the airplane show the Pentagon and CIA have used the plane more than 300 times and dropped off detainees in Syria, Egypt and Uzbekistan.
The Gulfstream and a similarly anonymous-looking Boeing 737 are hired by American agents from Premier Executive Transport Services, a private company in Massachusetts.
Analysis of the plane's flight plans, covering more than two years, shows that it always departs from Washington DC.
It has flown to a total of 49 destinations outside the US, including the Guantánamo Bay prison camp in Cuba and other US military bases, as well as Egypt, Jordan, Iraq, Morocco, Afghanistan, Libya and Uzbekistan.
Witnesses have claimed that the suspects are frequently bound, gagged and sedated before being put on board the planes, which do not have special facilities for prisoners but are kitted out with tables for meetings and screens for presentations and in-flight films.
The US plane is not used just for carrying prisoners but also appears to be at the disposal of defense and intelligence officials on assignments from Washington.

On 18/19 December 2001, according to an inquiry conducted by the Swedish Parliamentary Ombudsmen, the Gulfstream V took Ahmed Agiza and Mohammed al-Zari from Sweden to Cairo.
Amnesty International's records show that the plane had made several trips between Cairo and Prestwick earlier in the month, and stopped to refuel at Prestwick after leaving the two detainees in Cairo, where they were reportedly tortured.
In March 2005, the Chief Parliamentary Ombudsman in Sweden, having reviewed the Swedish government’s role in the transfer to Egypt of the two detainees, concluded that the "the Swedish Security Police lost control of the situation at the airport and during the transport to Egypt.
The American security personnel took charge...
Such total surrender of power to exercise public authority on Swedish territory is clearly contrary to Swedish law."
      CIA Rendition Flights Used UK Airfields      
      Amnesty International      December 15, 2005      
November 17, 2004      www.DemocracyNow.org
Rendition
Stephen Grey
AMY GOODMAN:  We're joined by Stephen Grey, who is a journalist with the Sunday Times, who exposed the story this week, how the U.S. is operating these secret flights.  Welcome to Democracy Now!
STEPHEN GREY:  Hi.
AMY GOODMAN:  Can you tell us further about these flights, who the people are, and how you found out about them?
STEPHEN GREY:  Well, first of all, it has remained something of a mystery, the whole story.
Obviously, bit by bit, the whole — this kind of secret world is unraveling.
And we are getting more and more information about the individual cases, where these planes are being used.
What it exposes is the tentacles of a wider system whereby prisoners are being taken in the war on terror, not only to Guantánamo, but to many other place and those places include the prisons of so-called allies of the U.S. and Britain, around the world.
Those countries which are allies of the U.S. include countries where torture is routine.
Obviously, the concerns that many people have are that these kind of transfers basically allow the U.S. to pass prisoners into the hands of the secret police of other countries to do the kind of interrogation, torture in fact, of prisoners that the U.S. is not allowed to do itself.
Kind of torture by proxy.
AMY GOODMAN:  The company, can you talk about that?
STEPHEN GREY: Yeah. I mean, I think the company is not that important in a sense.
These are private planes.
They're being leased.
They're not marked.
That's the point about them.
They can appear anywhere, and you have, you know, innocent-looking, if you like, executive jets parked on the runways of airports around the world.
No one is to know they're actually planes run by the U.S. military and intelligence services.
So, they have a perfect cover, if you like.
But it's — what's happening is that — I mean, they're hired from a company that operates in Massachusetts, and others.
But you know, they're probably just a normal, private company.
What they're doing is leasing it out.
They only work for the government.
As I say, the plane is not just used for carrying prisoners.
It's also used for transferring of interrogators and also regular V.I.P. and defense and intelligence officials from Washington.
But what we have found is at least four cases which have emerged where this plane has been seen actually picking up prisoners, and in the first case which we discovered, the prisoner was — the two prisoners were taken from Sweden to Egypt, and at the time — this has happened just after September 11, and it's been going on since, but in this case, just after September 11, two prisoners were taken on board.
The Swedish government never mentioned the U.S. at the time.
They said they were just sending — extraditing two prisoners.
What actually happened was that the U.S. was there with the secret plane.
They stripped these men of their clothes, handcuffed them, put them in diapers, gave them sedatives against their will, put them on the plane, and took them to Egypt.
And since then, we have discovered these planes — these prisoners complained of being very seriously tortured with electric shocks all over their bodies as a result of being taken to Egypt.
That's the consequence of this kind of process which we know is rendition.
AMY GOODMAN: Stephen Grey, I want to thank you for being with us, the Sunday Times of London, exposing the U.S. torture flights.
kewe note:   Part of the article mentioned at top of page.
Amnesty has done an extensive report on prison conditions in Uzbekistan.   See below.
Torture and death in Uzbekistan
They took a scalpel to my right chest — Penis cut

On 12 January 2002, according to Indonesian security officials, the Gulfsteam V, N379P, took Muhammad Saad Iqbal Madni from Jakarta to Cairo.
Amnesty International records confirm previous media reports that when the plane left Cairo, it flew to Prestwick to refuel.
Iqbal Madni has since been returned to US custody, and is currently being held at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba.
He does not have a lawyer, and other detainees have said in the last month that he is in poor condition and "at risk of losing his mind".
      CIA Rendition Flights Used UK Airfields      
      Amnesty International      December 15, 2005      
 
Thousands of Palestinians say they were tortured by Israel

The torturing of Iraqi prisoners at the Abu Ghuraib prison by US occupying forces has shocked the world — but for most Palestinians they come as no surprise.
American have been training in the techiques in Israel
       Torture techniques no surprise       
     Circus of Death 2010     
     Circus of Death 2009     
     Circus of Death 2008     
     Circus of Death 2007     
     Circus of Death 2006     
     Circus of Death 2005     
     Circus of Death 2004     
     Circus of Death 2003     
     Circus of Torture — Part I     
Friday, June 1st, 2007
"The Task Force Report Should Be Annulled" - Member of 2005 APA Task Force on Psychologist Participation in Military Interrogations Speaks Out — Click Here
In 2005, the American Psychological Association convened a Presidential Task Force on Psychological Ethics and National Security that concluded psychologists' participation in military interrogations was "consistent with the APA Code of Ethics."
It was later revealed that six of nine voting members were from the military and intelligence agencies with direct connections to interrogations at Guantánamo and elsewhere.
In a Democracy Now! broadcast exclusive, we speak with two members of the task force, Dr. Jean Maria Arrigo and Dr. Nina Thomas.
Arrigo says the task force report "should be annulled," because the process was "flawed."
As an example, Arrigo says she was "told very sharply" by one of the military psychologists not to take notes during the proceedings.
She later archived the entire listserve of the task force and sent it to Senate Armed Services Committee.
We also speak with Dr. Eric Anders, a former Air Force officer who underwent harsh training in "SERE" (Survival, Evasion, Resistance and Escape) techniques, as well as Dr. Leonard Rubenstein, Executive Director of Physicians for Human Rights.
From Kewe      TheWE.biz
It is not possible for me to adequately express wording for what has taken place in American society, from Obama to Bush and down the line of administrations, with regard to the U.S. government's practices of torture, its sadism, and its continuing killing and injuring of human beings.
Needless to say all who have been involved should not in the future — to human, animal or insect — have any contact.
All in the medical profession, all psychologists and psychiatrists, all military personnel, all government servants involved, should be tried as war criminals of the highest order.
A court based upon the Nuremberg trials must be convened.
These people do need to be removed from society.
As for torture itself, no one has spoken of it better that Orwell:
"The object of torture is torture!"
Torture Part I
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